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Personal Communications, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date Apr 1999

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
  • Any network, any terminal, anywhere [cellular radio]

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 22 - 30
    Cited by:  Papers (9)  |  Patents (81)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1332 KB)  

    In light of the current technology trends in the area of applications, wireless networks, and terminals, this article isolates a number of design requirements of future advanced mobile systems. We discuss research and standardization activities in the area of service support platforms and their corresponding application programming interfaces (API), where we especially focus on the wireless application protocol (WAP), Mobile Station Execution Environment (MExE), and HTTP-NG as candidates for the provision of mobile Internet services in cellular networks View full abstract»

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  • Software-defined radio: facets of a developing technology

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 38 - 44
    Cited by:  Papers (52)  |  Patents (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1100 KB)  

    Software radio has emerged from obscurity to be heralded by some in the personal communications industry as offering a potential solution to man's historical inability to achieve common global standards. In such a scenario reconfigurable terminals, able to adapt to the differing regional radio interfaces, if feasible in the appropriate timescales, appear a very attractive option. In reality, the future of software-defined radio is perhaps, at the same time, both much less and much more than this. At one level, the advent of the true software-reconfigurable “universal handset” may lie beyond the launch date of third-generation systems. Equally, however, software radio will profoundly impact not only technology but also industry structures. Software-defined radio reflects the convergence of two dynamically developing technological forces: digital radio and real-time downloadable software. The former has facilitated the wireless revolution, and the latter has both facilitated and ridden the Internet wave. The massive growth and convergence of these two markets is both creating the applications demand for third-generation personal communications and simultaneously threatening some of the existing ground rules of the wireless industry. Software radio is in its infancy-in this article we explore its first steps, describe facets of the technological possibilities and implications, and try to postulate into what will it grow View full abstract»

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  • Convergence trends for fixed and mobile services

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 14 - 21
    Cited by:  Papers (6)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1304 KB)  

    The interest and demand for convergent solutions affecting fixed and mobile services has grown due to liberalization in the service offering regime and induced levels of competition among operators. A variety of convergence actions has been planned and studied by both incumbent and new entrant operators in Europe, where innovative service packages are already being offered. Any convergence initiative pursues objectives of service and/or commercial nature through some association of fixed and mobile services. Among the factors driving convergence are: the possibility of configuring services matching diversified user needs; exploitation of network infrastructure; and economically attractive market opportunities. This article considers these factors as part of a discussion of several examples of convergence. The article also focuses on the parallel, and fundamentally alternative, approach based on the offer of typical fixed applications through mobile networks. This “substitution” trend takes advantage of the continued penetration of mobile services and sophistication of mobile systems, and will significantly influence the future convergence paths and opportunities View full abstract»

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  • The challenges of seamless handover in future mobile multimedia networks

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 32 - 37
    Cited by:  Papers (11)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (872 KB)  

    One of the major objectives of third-generation mobile communications systems (TGMS) is the seamless integration of advanced multimedia services over both fixed and mobile networks leading to fixed-mobile convergence. Such systems will support audio, video, multimedia, data, and speech services in a variety of environments with levels of service for mobile users comparable to service currently available for fixed users. To achieve this, TGMS systems must provide adequate performance (in terms of bits per second) for each user in each of the operating environments foreseen. Despite considerable support from many sources (academia, network equipment manufacturers) the homogeneous network architecture that universal adoption of ATM would have provided seems unlikely to become a reality. The very rapid development of ultra-high-speed members of the Ethernet “family” has pre-empted the unique scalability promise of ATM. At the same time, the explosive growth of Internet-based applications and services has ensured that IP will remain the network layer protocol of choice for the vast majority of next-generation systems. This article examines the challenges of handover across a single network domain, between network domains, and specifically between network domains of different levels of QoS. We report on various techniques for supporting mobile terminals, different approaches to handover, and specific issues associated with TCP/IP over wireless links. Finally, we identify some of the more advanced mobile systems R&D projects from the “seamless integration of advanced multimedia services” perspective before generating our conclusions View full abstract»

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  • A review of current routing protocols for ad hoc mobile wireless networks

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 46 - 55
    Cited by:  Papers (689)  |  Patents (96)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1956 KB)  

    An ad hoc mobile network is a collection of mobile nodes that are dynamically and arbitrarily located in such a manner that the interconnections between nodes are capable of changing on a continual basis. In order to facilitate communication within the network, a routing protocol is used to discover routes between nodes. The primary goal of such an ad hoc network routing protocol is correct and efficient route establishment between a pair of nodes so that messages may be delivered in a timely manner. Route construction should be done with a minimum of overhead and bandwidth consumption. This article examines routing protocols for ad hoc networks and evaluates these protocols based on a given set of parameters. The article provides an overview of eight different protocols by presenting their characteristics and functionality, and then provides a comparison and discussion of their respective merits and drawbacks View full abstract»

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This Magazine ceased publication in 2001. The current retitled publication is IEEE Wireless Communications.

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