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Robotics & Automation Magazine, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date March 1999

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Displaying Results 1 - 7 of 7
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  • Error rate equations for the general biometric system

    Page(s): 35 - 48
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1032 KB)  

    We derive equations for false-match and false-nonmatch error-rate prediction for the general M-to-N biometric identification system, under the simplifying, but limiting, assumption of statistical independence of all errors. For systems with large N, error rates are shown to be linked to the hardware processing speed through the system penetration coefficient and the throughput equation. These equations are somewhat limited in their ability to handle sample-dependent decision policies and are shown to be consistent with previously published cases for verification and identification. Applying parameters consistent with the Philippine Social Security System benchmark test results for AFIS vendors, we establish that biometric identification systems can be used in populations of 100 million people. Development of more generalized equations, accounting for error correlation and general sample-dependent thresholds, establishing confidence bounds, and substituting the inter-template for the impostor distribution under the template generating policy remain for future study View full abstract»

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  • The growing “magic” of automatic identification

    Page(s): 20 - 23, 56
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (416 KB)  

    Automatic identification represents a set of technologies that seems to work like magic. It's knowing instantly what's in a crate from 30 feet away; talking or looking into a machine that will automatically unlock a door; laser zapping a simple stamp-sized paper-and-ink symbol that describes an entire truck's contents; or instantly identifying a fingerprint-an unalterable and unique personal key to secure banking. Diverse auto ID technologies have, in fact, become so seamless and transparent to the end user that they do perform business magic for countless corporations and institutions around the world, reducing errors and speeding up processes and delivery by times, resulting in major cost savings up and down the supply chain, and really providing tools that allow people to do their job more effectively. From barcodes, to biometrics and beyond, the future holds exciting challenges and opportunities for the field of auto ID View full abstract»

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  • Recent advancements in automatic speaker authentication

    Page(s): 24 - 34
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (960 KB)  

    Verbal-information and fixed-phrase approaches for identifying a person via voice are ready for real-world applications. We focus exclusively on the use of voice for authentication applications and review advancements in this area. The technical components in speech recognition and verification systems are reviewed, and we then discuss a speech-verification system that utilizes stochastic matching to identify a person based on voice characteristics. We also discuss a verbal-information verification system that verifies identity through the content of the verbal information View full abstract»

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  • Novel signal-processing techniques in barcode scanning

    Page(s): 57 - 65
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (720 KB)  

    Traditional barcode scanners use analog edge detectors to detect the boundaries of dark and light areas. As long as the edge strength exceeds a given threshold, the detected edge is considered to correspond to a bar/space boundary. Such a hard decision often leads to errors, especially in scanning barcodes that are poorly printed or scanned from a distance. An earlier study showed that much better results can be obtained by working directly with samples of the analog data. However, that method requires storing the entire sampled waveform of a scan line in memory, which is not cost effective. The method described in the article attempts to combine the performance advantages of processing the samples of the analog waveform with the low-cost advantage of the traditional methods. We still rely on edge-detection circuits, however, in addition to saving the edge time we also store information about the edge strength. In this way, we have been able to produce many of the benefits of the approach described in Joseph and Pavlidis (1993) with only a small increase in cost View full abstract»

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  • Distributing identity [symmetry breaking distributed access protocols]

    Page(s): 49 - 56
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (896 KB)  

    In the next few years, computational, sensory, and communication capabilities will diffuse out of their present home in beige boxes on desktops and into everyday objects such as furniture, clothing, and other non-technological objects. As the cost of electronics continues to drop, the number of activated, networked devices will grow rapidly. Each device sharing a particular multiaccess channel will need a unique identifier for that channel. Present communication protocols such as Ethernet specify that the manufacturers must coordinate with one another in order to avoid assigning the same ID twice. The article explores methods by which the devices could coordinate with one another to manage ID assignment dynamically and automatically. In particular, the article is an investigation of distributed protocols that utilize physical sources of symmetry breaking to enable a network of initially identical units to acquire the unique identities required for point-to-point communication over a shared resource such as a bus or common RF band. It presents several protocols, compares their resource use (time, random bits, space, communication), and notes a trade-off among these measures of algorithm complexity View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Robotics and Automation Magazine is a unique technology publication which is peer-reviewed, readable and substantive.  The Magazine is a forum for articles which fall between the academic and theoretical orientation of scholarly journals and vendor sponsored trade publications.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Eugenio Guglielmelli
Laboratory of Biomedical Robotics
      and Biomicrosystems
Universita' Campus Bio-Medico
      di Roma