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Internet Computing, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Jan.-Feb. 1999

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Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • The true Meaning Of Analog

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 6 - 7
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • Object-orienting on the web

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 36 - 37
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  • Extensibly marked-up

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 74 - 75
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  • Who killed Gopher? An extensible murder mystery

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 81 - 84
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    Everyone knew there had to be an easier way to use the Internet than the Unix shell experience, mind you, but original editions of the Gopher and HyperText Transfer Protocols were painfully trivial hacks that did nothing FTP didn't already handle. So here begins our mysterious tale: why either protocol ever rose to prominence in the first place; and how the fratricidal drama eventually played out. Understanding how HTTP killed Gopher may lead us to the forces that may, in turn, topple HTTP View full abstract»

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  • TCP over satellite...the final frontier

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 76 - 80
    Cited by:  Papers (9)  |  Patents (1)
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    Communication satellites are now being used to transport TCP/IP traffic between distant locations, and to offer Internet access. Satellites have thus become the celestial link of the Internet, an “instant” infrastructure in the sky. The rapid growth of satellite communications is evolving the TCP/IP protocol suite in positive ways. In particular, enhancements to the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) to address the challenges of satellite transmission will benefit all high-bandwidth TCP communications. TCP is the predominant unicast transport protocol used by Internet applications such as Telnet, FTP, and HTTP. The ability of TCP to maximize the link utilization of a satellite channel is being challenged by the inherent delays associated with space communications and some of TCP's own behaviors. The author discusses the basics of using TCP for satellite transmission and describes the changes you can expect to see in the TCP protocol itself as a result of the increase in use of satellites for TCP/IP traffic View full abstract»

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  • Technologies for a Web object model

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 38 - 47
    Cited by:  Papers (17)  |  Patents (2)
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    The World Wide Web is an increasingly important factor in planning for general distributed computing environments. This article surveys Web technologies that look to integrate aspects of object technology with the basic infrastructure of the Web View full abstract»

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  • A “next generation” architecture for HTTP

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 69 - 73
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    The paper discusses HTTP-NG, a comprehensive rethinking of the Web's underlying protocol. It provides a framework for defining new Web applications, a powerful messaging system, and a multiplexing transport layer View full abstract»

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  • Programming the Web: the W3C DOM specification

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 48 - 54
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (19)
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    Developers manipulating Web documents to provide user interaction need a standard interface to those documents. The paper discusses the W3C Document Object Model Level 1 which defines the standardized interface. The DOM Level 1 defines a language- and platform-neutral API for accessing, navigating and manipulating HTML and XML documents. As such, it is a foundation for the development of applications that use Web documents in an object-oriented paradigm View full abstract»

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  • Gigabit Ethernet: from 100 to 1,000 Mbps

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 24 - 31
    Cited by:  Papers (9)  |  Patents (23)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (96 KB)  

    Gigabit Ethernet is the latest in the family of high-speed Ethernet technologies. It extends the operating speed of the world's most deployed LAN to 1 billion bits per second while maintaining compatibility with the installed base of 10 Mbps and 100 Mbps Ethernet equipment. The paper discusses the Gigabit Ethernet in terms of the ISO seven layer reference model View full abstract»

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  • Networking embedded agents

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 91 - 93
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
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    Most of us will soon be managing an intranet in our homes, though we might not realize it. We might also be surprised at the devices that will be networked together. Just about every electrical device now contains one or more microprocessors. Designers typically find this a cost-effective way to provide device functionality, even when much of a processor's power is unnecessary or unused. For example, my coffee maker contains a processor, even though the appliance needn't be very smart and wastes most of its CPU cycles. Nevertheless, it is cheaper to include a general-purpose microprocessor than to incorporate custom logic devices. My kitchen, in fact, has at least six processors, in such appliances as the microwave, the dishwasher, and the toaster. These household devices are diverse and use their processors in quite different ways, but in the future they will share one important characteristic: Each will contain an agent. The agent will provide an intelligent interface to the device and, most importantly, will communicate with other devices in my home. At present, my devices are not very agent-like, and it is not useful to think, “My toaster knows when the toast is done” or “My coffee pot knows when the coffee is ready.” However, once the devices are interconnected so that they can communicate, they can arrange to have my coffee and toast ready at approximately the same time. Then I may think of them in anthropomorphic terms. For example, when I shut off my alarm clock, I can imagine it telling my kitchen devices to prepare my breakfast. When devices talk to each other, they begin to seem more like agents. At: this point my house becomes more than just a collection of processors-it becomes a multiagent system communicating over an intranet View full abstract»

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  • Designing for customer interaction on the Web

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 32 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (1)
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    Many Web sites give the user a structure, such as a site map, to interact with. When debis (Daimler-Chrysler Inter Services, the services company of the Daimler-Chrysler Group) decided to offer information about car financing on its popular Web site, the company knew it faced a serious design challenge. The paper considers how Daimler-Chrysler Research designed a simple interface to a dynamic simulation that helps users learn by interacting with content, not structure View full abstract»

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  • Object-oriented Web application development

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 60 - 68
    Cited by:  Papers (25)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (132 KB)  

    Most Web applications are still developed ad hoc. One reason is the gap between established software design concepts and the low-level Web implementation model. We summarize work on WebComposition, a model for Web application development, then introduce the WebComposition Markup Language, an XML-based language that implements the model. WCML embodies object-oriented principles such as modularity, abstraction and encapsulation View full abstract»

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  • SWAP: leveraging the Web to manage workflow

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 85 - 88
    Cited by:  Papers (14)  |  Patents (1)
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    Many organizations are beginning to discover what workflow vendors already know-namely, that the real value of the Web lies not just in its documents and resources, but also in the activities surrounding them. Collaborative work involves not only handoff and routing of data between humans, but the coordination of activities among them and with automated agents as well. Workflow engines typically ensure that the information ends up on the right desktop along with the tools to accomplish a slated task. It is difficult to synchronize work and activity tracking within a technically diverse organization. Tools and formats typically differ among workgroups, as do skill levels and understanding among individual participants in a process. Browser-based user interfaces offer a mechanism to easily access distributed information and hand off documents and data over the Web, but at the expense of being able to effectively manage and track work activities. Web protocols provide no inherent support for automated change notification, handoff of control, or initiation of human- and computer-executed activities. In essence, there is no standard way for service requests to trigger a workflow process and monitor it across platforms and between organizations View full abstract»

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  • WIDL: interface definition for the Web

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 55 - 59
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (2)
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    webMethods developed an XML-based solution to automating exchanges between Web clients and servers. The Web Interface Definition Language-or WIDL, as it is called-is part of an extensible framework that integrates diverse applications over the Web. The paper discusses the XML in WIDL View full abstract»

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  • Cascade effects [WWW computer style sheets]

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 89 - 90
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    Our experience is typical of what happened at many Web sites in 1998, and this trend will likely accelerate as more sites drop support for older browsers in favour of the ease and strength of style sheets. It seems clear at this point that 1999 will be a watershed year for CSS. The new CSS2 specification builds on CSS1, greatly broadening the application areas. It includes the following major enhancements: Support for “paged media”, typically used in situations where a Web page will be printed on paper or transparency. It allows for dividing the page into sections that are not designed to be continuously scrolled on a computer screen. Greater font control, including the ability to point to fonts elsewhere on the Web, which I suspect many designers will go crazy with (as most have cursed the whole platform-font puzzle more than once). Position control for numerous regions and layers on a given page, which will finally unshackle designers from the ⟨table⟩ element as a page-layout tool for which it was never designed. Ways to invent style sheets for different “media types”, which is a major development for specialized application developers. For example, a page could be designed to render a document into speech (using a speech synthesizer plug-in on the client's computer), or on braille printers, palmtop computers, and other media View full abstract»

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IEEE Internet Computing provides journal-quality evaluation and review of emerging and maturing Internet technologies and applications.

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Editor-in-Chief
M. Brian Blake
University of Miami