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Parallel and Distributed Systems, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 12 • Date Dec. 1998

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • 1998 Index IEEE Transactions on Parallel And Distributed Systems - Author Index

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 1269 - 1273
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Subject index

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 1273 - 1280
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • An O((log log n)2) time algorithm to compute the convex hull of sorted points on reconfigurable meshes

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 1167 - 1179
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (416 KB)  

    The problem of computing the convex hull of a set of n sorted points in the plane is one of the fundamental tasks in image processing, pattern recognition, cellular network design, and robotics, among many others. Somewhat surprisingly, in spite of a great deal of effort, the best previously known algorithm to solve this problem on a reconfigurable mesh of size √n×√n was running in O(log2 n) time. It was open for more than ten years to obtain an algorithm for this important problem running in sublogarithmic time. Our main contribution is to provide the first breakthrough: we propose an almost optimal convex hull algorithm running in O((log log n)2) time on a reconfigurable mesh of size √n×√n. With slight modifications, this algorithm can be implemented to run in O((log log n)2) time on a reconfigurable mesh of size √n/loglogn×√n/loglogn. Clearly, the latter algorithm is work-optimal. We also show that any algorithm that computes the convex hull of a set of n sorted points on an n-processor reconfigurable mesh must take Ω(log log n) time. Our result opens the door to an entire slew of efficient convex-hull-based algorithms on reconfigurable meshes View full abstract»

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  • Cyclic-cubes: a new family of interconnection networks of even fixed-degrees

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 1253 - 1268
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (480 KB)  

    We introduce a new family of interconnection networks that are Cayley graphs with fixed degrees of any even number greater than or equal to four. We call the proposed graphs cyclic-cubes because contracting some cycles in such a graph results in a generalized hypercube. These Cayley graphs have optimal fault tolerance and logarithmic diameters. For comparable number of nodes, a cyclic-cube can have a diameter smaller than previously known fixed-degree networks. The proposed graphs can adopt an optimum routing algorithm known for one of its subfamilies of Cayley graphs. We also show that a graph in the new family has a Hamiltonian cycle and, hence, there is an embedding of a ring. Embedding of meshes and hypercubes are also discussed View full abstract»

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  • Basic operations on the OTIS-Mesh optoelectronic computer

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 1226 - 1236
    Cited by:  Papers (24)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (352 KB)  

    In this paper, we develop algorithms for some basic operations-broadcast, window broadcast, prefix sum, data sum, rank, shift, data accumulation, consecutive sum, adjacent sum, concentrate, distribute, generalize, sorting, random access read and write-on the OTIS-Mesh model. These operations are useful in the development of efficient algorithms for numerous applications View full abstract»

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  • Optimal parallel algorithms for finding proximate points, with applications

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 1153 - 1166
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
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    Consider a set P of points in the plane sorted by the x-coordinate. A point p in P is said to be a proximate point if there exists a point q on the x-axis such that p is the closest point to q over all points in P. The proximate point problem is to determine all the proximate points in P. Our main contribution is to propose optimal parallel algorithms for solving instances of size n of the proximate points problem. We begin by developing a work-time optimal algorithm running in O(log log n) time and using n/loglogn Common-CRCW processors. We then go on to show that this algorithm can be implemented to run in O(log n) time using n/logn EREW processors. In addition to being work-time optimal, our EREW algorithm turns out to also be time-optimal. Our second main contribution is to show that the proximate points problem finds interesting, and quite unexpected, applications to digital geometry and image processing. As a first application, we present a work-time optimal parallel algorithm for finding the convex hull of a set of n points in the plane sorted by x-coordinate; this algorithm runs in O(log log n) time using n/logn Common-CRCW processors. We then show that this algorithm can be implemented to run in O(log n) time using n/logn EREW processors. Next, we show that the proximate points algorithms afford us work-time optimal (resp, time-optimal) parallel algorithms for various fundamental digital geometry and image processing problems View full abstract»

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  • Multistep interactive convergence: an efficient approach to the fault-tolerant clock synchronization of large multicomputers

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 1195 - 1212
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (368 KB)  

    We present a new approach for fault-tolerant internal clock synchronization in multicomputer systems employing not completely connected networks (NCCNs). The approach is referred to as multistep interactive convergence and is locally implemented in each multicomputer node by a time server process (TSP). We describe a specific algorithm that uses multistep interactive convergence and bases its operation on a logical mapping of the system's TSPs into an m-dimensional array. A TSP executes m steps per round of synchronization, with each step including a call to an interactive convergence procedure. For any TSP, clock readings in step i are gathered only from TSPs with which it shares a row along dimension i of the array. Hence, a TSP reads clocks only from a small subset of the TSPs in the system, which reduces the number of messages by orders of magnitude over a conventional interactive convergence algorithm in which reliable all-to-all broadcast of clock values is done. The algorithm can be used in systems of arbitrary topology and provides the added benefit of increased locality of communication in regular NCCNs such as hypercubes and tori. These advantages can be combined with a variety of message staggering mechanisms to maintain network contention at a minimum. We present expressions for the maximum clock skew, maximum clock drift, maximum clock discontinuity, and number of messages produced by the algorithm, and show that it tolerates arbitrary faults. A comparison with other algorithms that elucidates the advantages of multistep interactive convergence is also provided View full abstract»

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  • On coordinated checkpointing in distributed systems

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 1213 - 1225
    Cited by:  Papers (37)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (440 KB)  

    Coordinated checkpointing simplifies failure recovery and eliminates domino effects in case of failures by preserving a consistent global checkpoint on stable storage. However, the approach suffers from high overhead associated with the checkpointing process. Two approaches are used to reduce the overhead: first is to minimize the number of synchronization messages and the number of checkpoints, the other is to make the checkpointing process nonblocking. These two approaches were orthogonal in previous years until the Prakash-Singhal algorithm combined them. In other words, the Prakash-Singhal algorithm forces only a minimum number of processes to take checkpoints and it does not block the underlying computation. However, we found two problems in this algorithm. In this paper, we identify these problems and prove a more general result: there does not exist a nonblocking algorithm that forces only a minimum number of processes to take their checkpoints. Based on this general result, we propose an efficient algorithm that neither forces all processes to take checkpoints nor blocks the underlying computation during checkpointing. Also, we point out future research directions in designing coordinated checkpointing algorithms for distributed computing systems View full abstract»

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  • Nonlinear and symbolic data dependence testing

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 1180 - 1194
    Cited by:  Papers (12)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (492 KB)  

    One of the most crucial qualities of an optimizing compiler is its ability to detect when different data references access the same storage location. Such references are said to be data-dependent and they impose constraints on the amount of program modifications the compiler can apply for improving the program's performance. For parallelizing compilers, the most important program constructs to investigate are loops and the array references they contain. In previous work, we have found a serious limitation of current data dependence tests to be that they cannot handle loop bounds or array subscripts that are symbolic, nonlinear expressions. In this paper, we describe a dependence test, called the range test, that can handle such expressions. Briefly, the range test proves independence by determining whether certain symbolic inequalities hold for a permutation of the loop nest. Powerful symbolic analyses and constraint propagation techniques were developed to prove such inequalities. The range test has been implemented in Polaris, a parallelizing compiler developed at the University of Illinois. We present measurements of the range test's performance and compare it with state-of-the-art tests View full abstract»

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  • Coding for high availability of a distributed-parallel storage system

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 1237 - 1252
    Cited by:  Papers (12)  |  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (512 KB)  

    We have developed a distributed parallel storage system that employs the aggregate bandwidth of multiple data servers connected by a high-speed wide-area network to achieve scalability and high data throughput. This paper studies different schemes to enhance the reliability and availability of such network-based distributed storage systems. The general approach of this paper employs “erasure” error-correcting codes that can be used to reconstruct missing information caused by hardware, software, or human faults. The paper describes the approach and develops optimized algorithms for the encoding and decoding operations. Moreover, the paper presents techniques for reducing the communication and computation overhead incurred while reconstructing missing data from the redundant information. These techniques include clustering, multidimensional coding, and the full two-dimensional parity schemes. The paper considers trade-offs between redundancy, fault tolerance, and complexity of error recovery View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems (TPDS) is published monthly. It publishes a range of papers, comments on previously published papers, and survey articles that deal with the parallel and distributed systems research areas of current importance to our readers.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
David Bader
College of Computing
Georgia Institute of Technology