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Information Technology in Biomedicine, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 4 • Date Dec. 1998

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Decision support and disease management: a logic engineering approach

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 217 - 228
    Cited by:  Papers (11)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (570 KB)  

    This paper describes the development and application of PROforma, a unified technology for clinical decision support and disease management. Work leading to the implementation of PROforma has been carried out in a series of projects funded by European agencies over the past 13 years. The work has been based on logic engineering, a distinct design and development methodology that combines concepts from knowledge engineering, logic programming, and software engineering. Several of the projects have used the approach to demonstrate a wide range of applications in primary and specialist care and clinical research. Concurrent academic research projects have provided a sound theoretical basis for the safety-critical elements of the methodology. The principal technical results of the work are the PROforma logic language for defining clinical processes and an associated suite of software tools for delivering applications, such as decision support and disease management procedures. The language supports four standard objects (decisions, plans, actions, and enquiries), each of which has an intuitive meaning with well-understood logical semantics. The development tool set includes a powerful visual programming environment for composing applications from these standard components, for verifying consistency and completeness of the resulting specification and for delivering stand-alone or embeddable applications. View full abstract»

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  • Reconciling users' needs and formal requirements: issues in developing a reusable ontology for medicine

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 229 - 242
    Cited by:  Papers (8)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (435 KB)  

    A common language, or terminology, for representing what clinicians have said and done is an important requirement for individual clinical systems, and it is a prerequisite for integrating disparate applications in a distributed telematic healthcare environment. Formal representations based on description logics or closely related formalisms are increasingly used for representing medical terminologies, GALEN's experience in using one such formalism raises two major issues, as follows: how to make ontologies based on description logics easy to use and understand for both clinicians and applications developers; what features are required of the ontology and description logic if they are to achieve their aims, based on our experience we put forward four contentions: two relating to each of these two issues, as follows: that natural language generation is essential to make a description logic based ontology accessible to users; that the description logic based ontology should be treated as an "assembly language" and accessed via "intermediate representations" oriented to users and "perspectives" adapting it to specific applications; that independence and reuse are best supported by partitioning the subsumption hierarchy of elementary concepts into orthogonal taxonomies, each of which forms a pure tree in which the branches at each level are disjoint but nonexhaustive subconcepts of the parent concept; that the expressivity of the description logic must include support for transitive relations despite the computational cost. View full abstract»

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  • Integration of clinical information across patient records: a comparison of mechanisms used to enforce semantic coherence

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 243 - 253
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (211 KB)  

    Semantic coherence of clinical information is the bottleneck for true interoperability among applications in health telematics. Healthcare records are in principle made up of statements about the patient's health and activities performed, organized within attested transactions or messages. Various mechanisms have been developed to optimally represent details of statements in a record system, creating de facto three subdivisions: (1) "containers" of clinical information, i.e., section headings, data elements in local records; segments and data fields in messages; (2) their "contents," i.e., coding systems and terminologies; and (3) "transaction context," i.e., circumstances related to document production and message exchange, typically represented in their headers. Details rely on a common semantic background and should, therefore, be seen in a continuum; nevertheless, design methodologies and tools for the three subdivisions evolved independently and assignment of details to subdivisions is not predetermined by principles, but depends on implementation issues. Recent developments within the European Committee for Standardization (CEN/TC251/WG II) and in the European Project GALEN-IN-USE provide a new insight on semantics in healthcare. In order to guide harmonization of semantic aspects in the different series of standards-in information models, messages, document markup, terminology systems-we present a comparison of the various mechanisms they use to enforce semantic coherence on clinical information. View full abstract»

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  • Relief for maritime medical emergencies through telematics

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 254 - 260
    Cited by:  Papers (7)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (637 KB)  

    MERMAID is a European Union (EU)-financed maritime telemedicine project with global reach and 24 h multilingual capability to serve multinational crews working in the isolation of the world's oceans. It provides a model for the provision of healthcare services based on the electronic transmission of medical information via ISDN-based videoconferencing. This model is not limited to medical diagnostics, but it encompasses all cases in which the actual delivery of healthcare services involves a patient who is not located where the provider is. Its implementation requires the commissioning of an extensive telecommunications infrastructure that includes both satellite transmission for ship to shore communication and an extensive ground-based network for summoning expert medical help from around the world so as to meet the project's multilinguality requirements and, therefore, the exploration of a number of solutions. In fact, all categories of telemedical applications (audio and video conferencing, multimedia communications, flat file and image transfer with low-, medium-, and high-bandwidth data requirements) are considered, while the full range of network choices (digital land lines, cellular/wireless, satellite, and broadband) are being tested in terms of cost/performance tradeoffs that are inherent to them and the developmental stage each of these options occupies in their lifecycle. Finally, out of that, MERMAID utilizes advanced land-based line transmission technologies to aid the remote patient by making available the specialist care that is best suited in the particular case. View full abstract»

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  • A novel emergency telemedicine system based on wireless communication technology-AMBULANCE

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 261 - 267
    Cited by:  Papers (93)  |  Patents (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (317 KB)  

    Recent studies conclude that early and specialized prehospital management contributes to emergency case survival. We have developed a portable medical device that allows telediagnosis, long distance support, and teleconsultation of mobile healthcare providers by expert physicians. The device allows the transmission of vital biosignals and still images of the patient from the emergency site to the consultation site using the GSM mobile telephony network. The device can telematically "bring" an expert specialist doctor to the site of the medical emergency, allow him/her to evaluate patient data, and issue directions to the emergency personnel on treatment procedures until the patient is brought to the hospital. Legal reasons mandated the inclusion at the consultation site of a multimedia database able to store and manage the data collected by the system. The performance of the system has been validated in four different countries using a controlled medical protocol and a set of 100 patients per country treated has been collected and analyzed. View full abstract»

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  • ViVa: the virtual vascular project

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 268 - 274
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (559 KB)  

    The aim of the virtual vascular project (ViVa) is to develop tools for the modern hemodynamicist and cardiovascular surgeon to study and interpret the constantly increasing amount of information being produced by noninvasive imaging equipment. In particular, we are developing a system able to process and visualize three dimensional (3D) medical data, reconstruct the geometry of arteries of specific patients, and simulate blood flow in them. The initial applications of the system will be for clinical research and training purposes. In a later stage, we explore the application of the system to surgical planning. ViVa is based on an integrated set of tools, each dedicated to a specific aspect of the data processing and simulation pipeline: image processing and segmentation; real time 3D volume visualization; 3D geometry reconstruction; 3D mesh generation; and blood flow simulation and visualization. View full abstract»

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  • Virtual environments in neuroscience

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 275 - 281
    Cited by:  Papers (12)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (483 KB)  

    Virtual environments (VEs) let users navigate and interact with computer generated three dimensional (3D) environments in real time, allowing for the control of complex stimuli presentation. These VEs have attracted much attention in medicine, especially in remote or augmented surgery, and surgical training, which are critically dependent on hand-eye coordination. Recently, however, some research projects have begun to test the possibility of using VEs for the study and rehabilitation of human cognitive and functional activities. The paper highlights recent and ongoing research related to the applications of VEs in the neuroscience arena. In particular, it focuses on the American and European initiatives in this field, including a description of the European Commission (EC) funded VREPAR projects. Finally, the paper provides a general introduction to virtual reality (VR), as it relates to its impact on cognitive and functional abilities. View full abstract»

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  • A system for medical consultation and education using multimodal human/machine communication

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 282 - 291
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (691 KB)  

    We propose a novel application of an interactive and distributed system in medical consultation and education. The presented application uses a multiuser, collaborative environment with multimodal human/machine communication in the dimensions of sight, sound, and touch. The experimental setup, consisting of two user stations, and the multimodal interfaces, including sight (eye tracking), sound (automatic speech), and touch (microbeam pen), were tested and evaluated. The system uses a collaborative workspace as a common visualization space. Users communicate with the application through a fusion agent by eye tracking, speech, and microbeam pen. The audio/video teleconferencing is also included to help the radiologists to communicate with each other simultaneously while they are working on the mammograms. The system has three software agents: a fusion agent, a conversational agent, and an analytic agent. The fusion agent interprets multimodal commands by integrating the multimodal inputs. The conversational agent answers the user's questions and detects human related or semantic errors and notifies the user about the results of the image analysis. The analytic agent enhances the digitized images using the wavelet denoising algorithm if requested by the user. To evaluate the system, we used it for medical consultation on mammograms. Results also show that the relevant information about the region of interest of the mammograms chosen by the users is extracted automatically and used to enhance the mammograms. View full abstract»

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  • 1998 Index IEEE Transactions on Information Technology In Biomedicine Vol. 2 - Author Index

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 293 - 295
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (168 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Subject index

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 295 - 298
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (142 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine publishes basic and applied papers of information technology applications in health, healthcare and biomedicine.

 

This Transaction ceased publication in 2012. The current retitled publication is IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics.

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Editor-in-Chief
Yuan-ting Zhang
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