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MultiMedia, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date Oct-Dec 1998

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Digital dancing

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 8 - 12
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (348 KB)  

    The author considers how a dance community has evolved in cyberspace. The emergence of the World Wide Web has led to an upsurge of creative exploration by dance artists as they discover, in ever-increasing numbers, this new technology's potential. The pervasiveness of information and communications technologies has produced new levels of thought, new concepts, and new types of human interaction. The author discusses the Cassandra Project performance which uses a videoconferencing system over the Internet. Computer networks connecting performers in real time with other performers and audiences at remote sites allow for text, dance and music to serve as improvisational material during the performance View full abstract»

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  • VistaMail: an integrated multimedia mailing system

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 13 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (6)  |  Patents (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (184 KB)  

    VistaMail, a fully integrated multimedia mailing system, lets users easily create, send, and view audio and video components. The system treats these components as part of a single unified message rather than as additions to the text portion. This article discusses the design of the multimedia mail system and some of the issues involved in implementing it View full abstract»

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  • Enhancing call-detail reporting using multimedia technologies

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 74 - 77
    Cited by:  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (108 KB)  

    Two features have motivated the Web's growth: timely information; and information not previously available everywhere. The most common complaint about older application systems is their isolation, they are not easily accessible to others. This calls for integrating the Web, a distribution mechanism, with the application system, providing timely information. The maintenance costs of both hardware and software are comparable with the older systems. Superior information technology solutions can help us obtain such desirable results. One such solution is a call-detail application, not previously available to users through the Web having multimedia capabilities. The Advanced Telecommunications Institute (ATI) designed and implemented the call-detail reporting application, which can be directly accessed at the end-user's desktop using a Web browser. We discuss the project-enhancing call-detail reporting using multimedia technologies View full abstract»

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  • An architecture for emotional agents

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 24 - 33
    Cited by:  Papers (16)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (368 KB)  

    We propose a general, flexible, and powerful architecture to build software agents that embed artificial emotions. These artificial emotions achieve functionalities for conveying emotions to humans, thus allowing more effective, stimulating, and natural interactions between humans and agents. An emotional agent also possesses rational knowledge and reactive capabilities, and interacts with the external world, including other agents View full abstract»

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  • Multimedia broadcasting over the Internet. I

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 78 - 82
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (408 KB)  

    Although the industry is still in the early stages of webcasting, we can already foresee what the Internet will offer a few years down the line: clear, crisp audio and full-screen, high-quality, on-demand video. We have developed a technology that provides all these required features for Internet webcasting. This technology consists of: IP Simulcast, a new Internet broadcast protocol, which provides inexpensive, efficient, and reliable audio and video broadcasting; and new audio and video compression algorithms, which allow real-time audio and video transmission of data at low bit rates and with high quality. In this article, we describe a new Internet broadcast technology View full abstract»

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  • An introduction to the Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 84 - 88
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (60 KB)  

    The Web, now a multimedia environment, can handle audio, images, text and video. However, creating TV-like multimedia presentations proves difficult. It either requires complex, timer-based programming in a scripting language (such as Javascript) or an authoring tool for multimedia presentations. To allow a broader audience to author multimedia presentations for the Web, the World Wide Web Consortium developed the Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language. SMIL, an easy-to-learn HTML-like language, allows the use of a text editor to write multimedia presentations. SMIL is a W3C recommendation, and several implementations are available. This article explains how to write a multimedia presentation in SMIL View full abstract»

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  • Synchronizing computer graphics animation and audio

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 63 - 73
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (484 KB)  

    Our prototype authoring tool synchronizes computer graphics animation, narration and background music. It lets users visualize the contents of a background music track and narration along a single time line and displays an animation's scenario sharing the same time line. A graphical user interface supports interactive editing of both background music and narration without any loss in quality View full abstract»

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  • Synchronization for interactive multimedia presentations

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 44 - 62
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (328 KB)  

    When multimedia presentations allow users to make online adjustments such as reverse, skip, freeze-restart, and scale, maintaining temporal synchrony among several media streams becomes a complex modeling problem. Our approach uses dynamic extended finite-state machines for the task-an “actor” DEFSM for each medium and a “synchronizer” DEFSM to orchestrate them. This model achieves clear state-transition control flow and allows concise, precise specifications View full abstract»

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  • Delivering interactive services via a digital TV infrastructure

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 34 - 43
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (200 KB)  

    This article discusses an architecture for interactive service delivery to the home via the digital television (DTV) infrastructure in systems with and without return channels. This approach relies on a broadcast computing model adapted to suit the DTV environment. The model works even with low-cost user terminals, such as the basic DTV set-top boxes with limited computational and graphics capability and no local disk storage View full abstract»

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The magazine contains technical information covering a broad range of issues in multimedia systems and applications

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John R. Smith
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center