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Potentials, IEEE

Issue 5 • Date Dec1998/Jan 1999

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Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
  • Bioelectric potentials

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 5 - 8
    Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (844 KB)  

    Electrical signals are used extensively within the human body to transfer information from one point to another. The signals travel through the nervous system and muscle fibers in what are known as excitable cells. The biopotentials are produced as a result of interactions between electrical and chemical activities. Electrically, a cell exhibits an ionic voltage, a resting potential, across its me... View full abstract»

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  • Medical imaging. Computerized tomography

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 9 - 12
    Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1464 KB)  

    Successful, modern medical imaging is possible thanks to high-speed digital computers and efficient, signal processing algorithms. The introduction of the first CT scanner in 1972 revolutionized medical imaging and has improved contemporary health care. There are many types of interaction phenomenon that can image the human body, thus giving the physician an array of diagnostic tools. However, the... View full abstract»

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  • Positron emission tomography. Tracing how and why it is so successful

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 13 - 16
    Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1132 KB)  

    PET is one of the most advanced medical imaging systems widely applied to medical research and clinical use. The present PET scanning technique cannot be performed in small animals such as mice. The detector is not optimal with respect to radiotracer sensitivity due to the lack of spatial resolution. (The problem is further exacerbated due to the lack of a computer model and the unknown amount of ... View full abstract»

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  • RVSM [Radar Vital Signs Monitor]

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 21 - 24
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1588 KB)  

    Today's radar locates and tracks aircraft, measures the speed of fastballs and helps catch “lead foots.” Most radar gather information from objects. However, researchers at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) are exploring radar's ability to measure physiological data in humans. The new radar measures tiny movements of the human body caused by respiration and the beating heart. ... View full abstract»

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  • Meeting the analog world challenge. Nyquist-rate analog-to-digital converter architectures

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 36 - 39
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1176 KB)  

    To bring digital processing and its benefits to bear on real-world applications, the analog signal of interest must be translated into a format a digital computer can utilize. This is the function of the analog-to-digital converter (ADC). After processing by a digital computer or digital signal processor (DSP), the resulting digital stream of information must be returned to its analog form by a di... View full abstract»

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  • Cutting edge acoustics. Non-invasive surgery using ultrasound

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 17 - 20
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2116 KB)  

    Focused ultrasound surgery is a procedure whereby high-power ultrasound is pinpointed into the body. At high enough intensities, the tissue at the focus can be thermally burned or mechanically destroyed. Tissue in front or behind the focus is not affected since the intensity is much lower. This results in less overall internal trauma; i.e., faster healing. The goal at the Focused Ultrasound Surger... View full abstract»

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  • The software talent shortage. Some thoughts on the subject

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 26 - 29
    Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (960 KB)  

    Projections from all sources show a widening gap between supply and demand for software professionals. In January 1998, the Information Technology Association of America announced their study estimating 340,000 open information technology (IT) positions in the US. This estimate did not include non-profit, federal, state or local government jobs or small companies. At the same time, Richard Daley, ... View full abstract»

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  • Gallium arsenide. Its uses in photovoltaic applications

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 33 - 35
    Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (964 KB)  

    In the multitude of semiconductors today, there are only a few which stand out due to their unique properties. Gallium arsenide (GaAs) is one. It is a compound III-V semiconductor made up of gallium (a group V element with an orthorhombic crystal structure) and arsenic (a group III element with a trigonal crystal structure). The unique property that gallium arsenide has is its ability to turn elec... View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Potentials is the magazine dedicated to undergraduate and graduate students and young professionals.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
David Tian
Carnegie Mellon University
david.tian@ieee.org