By Topic

Engineering Management, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 4 • Date Nov. 1998

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 13 of 13
  • Author index

    Page(s): 1 - 2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (150 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Subject index

    Page(s): 2 - 5
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (141 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Perspective of technological innovation and technology management in China

    Page(s): 381 - 387
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (104 KB)  

    This paper introduces the evolutionary process of technological innovation and technology management in Chinese enterprises since 1949. First, the transition of corporate management and technology management in China is introduced in comparison to Western-style management. Then, based on the historical description and case studies, the typical technology development process, especially the processes of technological acquisition, learning and secondary innovation in Chinese enterprises, is analyzed. The integration between technology acquisition and in-house design and R&D is emphasized. The authors suggest that “assimilation and self-design upon imported technology” (3-I policy) is the suitable and vital technology development avenue for most Chinese firms. To accomplish such a technological avenue, coordination, which exists between product innovation and process innovation, corporate strategy and technology strategy, and technology evolution and organizational change must be organized well and dynamically. As Chinese firms face more severe competition than ever, more attention should be paid to the development of indigenous capabilities for technological innovation. The firms' innovation system (FIS), which emphasizes the infrastructure support for a firms entrepreneurship, R&D system, and organization, as well as high-talent personnel, should be established or improved. Thus, technology strategy and the technological innovation system are currently the two key issues of management of technology (MOT) in China and will continue to be into the coming century View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Software design: concept generation as part of formal and informal processes

    Page(s): 396 - 406
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (172 KB)  

    This paper examines the relationship between formal product development management tools and actual business processes in a world class company, NCR, Dundee, Scotland, UK, whose manufactured products include significant associated computer software written and designed in-house. After providing some background to the company and the research project which has led to this paper, a detailed case study of the software design and development processes in NCR is presented. This is contrasted with the formal management approach NCR is endeavoring to follow. The authors identify some key inconsistencies between the two processes and consider the implications for improving the management of the concept generation process View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Productivity improvement at a high-tech state-owned industry-an Indonesian case study of employee motivation

    Page(s): 388 - 395
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (104 KB)  

    The purpose of this case study was to identify the level of employee motivation at an Indonesian high-tech state-owned company. Comparisons were drawn between labor and management as well as Indonesian and Western industrial environments. The overall results provide insight into employee motivation and the potential for productivity improvement that should prove beneficial to management at state-owned and privately owned companies in Indonesia and the Pacific Rim. The study can also help Westerners appreciate culture differences and productivity challenges in this developing country View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The development strategies for Taiwan's semiconductor industry

    Page(s): 349 - 356
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (80 KB)  

    Taiwan's integrated circuit (IC) industry development process can be separated into three stages: the initiation stage, consisting of obtaining technology and facilitating setup of domestic companies; the burgeoning stage, consisting of the formation of manufacturer's R&D abilities; and the growth stage, consisting of further raising an industry's international competitive levels. In each stage this article examines the development strategy from the perspective of interactions among the government, research institute, and the domestic industry in terms of technology selection, R&D activities, technology transfer, and industry development results. Finally, factors underlying success, issues arising from the case, and suggestions for newly industrialized countries are discussed View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A method of measuring the efficiency of the knowledge utilization process

    Page(s): 414 - 423
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (176 KB)  

    This paper presents a model to assess the efficiency of knowledge transfer within an organization. First, a literature review of knowledge transfer management with a practical contribution to the shop-floor activities is presented. Second, a model of the knowledge transfer process with five distinctive phases is suggested. Third, an efficiency index is proposed to provide an objective numerical measure of the process. The numerical index is defined as a function of three attributes: process delay; effort; and width. Its properties and limitations are discussed. Several pilot studies have been launched to test the validity of the model. One pilot is introduced in this paper View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Recommendations from the commercialization of government-sponsored telecommunications R&D with multiple development cycles in Korea

    Page(s): 331 - 337
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (80 KB)  

    A number of government-sponsored large-scale R&D projects in the telecommunications sector have been carried out in Korea. Among them is the time division exchange (TDX) project that lasted for more than 15 years. The project has two characteristics: the commercialization of government-sponsored R&D and the commercialization of R&D with multiple development cycles. This paper describes these characteristics of the project from various viewpoints: product development strategy, the role of each organization, success factors of each product, the classification of commercial products by commercialization model, and technology transfer strategies encouraging participation of manufacturing firms. We conclude with several recommendations View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Corporate R&D strategy portfolio in Japanese and Australian technology-based firms: an empirical study

    Page(s): 323 - 330
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (144 KB)  

    This paper presents an empirical study on the strategic structure of corporate R&D in Japanese and Australian technology-based companies. The perceived importance and distribution of basic research, precompetitive strategic research and applied research within a corporate R&D portfolio are examined through a comparative analysis of survey data. The results suggest that Japanese firms tend to place great emphasis on basic and precompetitive strategic research, although applied research still retains its importance. They recognize that basic research is critical to achieve long-term competitive advantages in the marketplace. Australian firms also realize the importance of basic research and the use of portfolio approach in R&D management. However, research work in Australian firms tends to focus on applied research with only a limited involvement in medium- and long-term research. Finally, it is concluded that Japanese firms utilize a portfolio approach to corporate R&D management more systematically than do their Australian counterparts View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • R&D project selection versus R&D project generation

    Page(s): 407 - 413
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (108 KB)  

    Much of the technical literature emphasizes R&D project selection. This paper reviews the author's experience with R&D project selection. In his view, this experience suggests that the emphasis should be on the generation of high-quality R&D projects through effective communication of corporate priorities, implementation issues, and related technical efforts View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Hong Kong government policy and information technology innovation: the invisible hand, the helping hand, and the hand-over to China

    Page(s): 366 - 380
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (220 KB)  

    Although Hong Kong and Singapore have remarkably similar social, economic, and historical profiles, their policies to promote economic and technological progress constitute an on-going natural experiment and provide a stark contrast. The well-documented, state-led information technology (IT) effort in Singapore is used here to benchmark the lesser known policies and interventions of the Hong Kong government and to examine their impact on IT innovation. Economic restructuring and political uncertainty in Hong Kong, resulting in the mass emigration of manufacturing operations and the professional elite, have prompted a traditionally noninterventionist state to selectively complement the invisible hand of market forces. The Hong Kong government has supported knowledge building and diffusion and helped to create public goods such as electronic commerce, but it has stopped short of guiding or directly subsidizing IT innovation efforts. Emerging IT issues and policy options are considered as Hong Kong becomes part of the People's Republic of China (PRC) under the principle of “one country, two systems”. Free trade and information flows, efficient telecommunications, property rights protection, and technology management expertise are identified as critical factors if Hong Kong is to remain an attractive conduit for and recipient of technology transfer, and if its businesses are to sustain their fast-follower and focus strategies, synergize technological innovations from China and the West, and capitalize on the vast new domestic market View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Industrial development and structural adaptation in Taiwan: some issues of learned entrepreneurship

    Page(s): 338 - 348
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (92 KB)  

    The industrialization of Taiwan has been a remarkable phenomenon. This paper discusses changes in Taiwan's manufacturing industries and the response of both government and private enterprises to the challenges presented by a dynamic environment and by global competition. Several cases are discussed in light of the activities and adjustments on the part of government and of the public sector, of small and medium business, and of high-tech industries. Government participation over has been and will remain pivotal in economic growth and in achieving adjusted positioning. The accelerated sociopolitical movements toward democracy, the bureaucratic management of public issues, and the political and economic interactions between Taiwan and China, exert significant effects on the industrial structure and on government's role in directing the industrial evolution. This article presents an integrated reasoning of Taiwan's economic success. It reveals that the neoclassical doctrine of market efficiency is fundamentally valid, and that the effective commercialization of national technological capability has created Taiwan's industrial evolution. Market governance proved to be an efficient short-term policy instrument when the latecomer strategy of cost leadership was applied. A conceptual model of industrial competition and technology commercialization is also proposed to facilitate the methodological analysis. This study concludes that learning capability and human capital will determine the endurance of Taiwan's industrial success, and that entrepreneurship must be learned by the state, as well as by the private firms View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Patterns of innovation in Korea and Taiwan

    Page(s): 357 - 365
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (324 KB)  

    This paper examines the technological capabilities of Korea and Taiwan using US patent statistics for the period 1969-1992. The analysis reveals three important trends. First, that the growth of Korean and Taiwanese technological activity has been rapid both during and after the 1980s. Second, that the processes of technological development in these countries show different patterns: a highly concentrated technical field with dynamic growth in Korea and a highly diversified technical field with stable growth in Taiwan. Third, it is shown that the main agent of Korea's technological innovation has been the small number of large companies in the electrical technology field, while Taiwan's patenting activities have been spread among a large number of individuals exploiting nonelectrical and miscellaneous technologies View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

Management of technical functions such as research, development, and engineering in industry, government, university, and other settings. Emphasis is on studies carried on within an organization to help in decision making or policy formation for RD&E. 

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Rajiv Sabherwal
Sam M. Walton College of Business, University of Arkansas