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Nuclear Science, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 5 • Date Oct 1998

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • Removal of the continuum of X-ray spectra using morphological operators

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 2281 - 2287
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (88 KB)  

    In energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis, the estimation and removal of the continuum on which the X-ray spectrum is superimposed is a primary requirement. The algorithms commonly used are either complex, or in the case of, e.g., neural network algorithms, computation-intensive. They usually require strong constraints and/or hypotheses on the data or the shape of the continuum. Moreover, if the continuum amplitude is comparable to or bigger than the peak amplitudes, some of these algorithms can lose peaks. A new approach to continuum removal based on mathematical morphology is proposed here. The new algorithm permits fast continuum elimination without peak deterioration. Other than a rough estimate on the widths of the peaks, the new method does not require additional information about the spectrum. The method can also be applied without modification to background elimination from gamma ray spectra. This new method is described and results obtained from real and simulated spectra are discussed and evaluated View full abstract»

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  • The trigger system of the first CMS tracker beam tests

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 2314 - 2318
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (96 KB)  

    The trigger for the first compact muon solenoid (CMS) tracking beam tests is a dedicated system for analog multiplexed front-end electronics. With this first generation of electronics dedicated to CMS tracker detectors, some new specific development was necessary to read it with a multicrate distributed data acquisition (DAQ) system. The goal of this development was to reach a high scalability of experiment subsystems and a good robustness for test beams. Each subsystem had to be independent from the others, both from the hardware and software point of view. Remote control software for this system as well as further monitoring facilities were the required functions of the trigger system View full abstract»

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  • Wavelet decomposition and radial basis function networks for system monitoring

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 2293 - 2301
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (176 KB)  

    Two approaches are coupled to develop a novel collection of black box models for monitoring operational parameters in a complex system. The idea springs from the intention of obtaining multiple predictions for each system variable and fusing them before they are used to validate the actual measurement. The proposed architecture pairs the analytical abilities of the discrete wavelet decomposition with the computational power of radial basis function networks. Members of a wavelet family are constructed in a systematic way and chosen through a statistical selection criterion that optimizes the structure of the network. Network parameters are further optimized through a quasi-Newton algorithm. The methodology is demonstrated utilizing data obtained during two transients of the Monju fast breeder reactor. The models developed are benchmarked with respect to similar regressors based on Gaussian basis functions View full abstract»

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  • New algorithms for the Vavilov distribution calculation and the corresponding energy loss sampling

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 2288 - 2292
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (168 KB)  

    Two new algorithms for the fast calculation of the Vavilov distribution within the interval 0.01<x<10, where neither the Gaussian approximation nor the Landau distribution may be used, are presented. These algorithms are particularly convenient for the sampling of the corresponding random energy loss. A comparison with the exact Vavilov distribution for the case of protons traversing Al slabs is given View full abstract»

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  • Range-uncertainty imaging for obtaining dose perturbations in proton therapy

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 2309 - 2313
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (108 KB)  

    The proton dose distribution of a monoenergetic parallel proton beam in a biological sample (a sheep head in a mold) has been calculated using a Monte Carlo code. The calculations have been performed both including the effect of multiple Coulomb scattering of the protons at the atoms in the phantom and without it. The resulting dose distributions were subtracted from each other and their absolute value was integrated in the direction of the incident proton beam. This projected dose difference was compared to measurements of proton range uncertainties obtained using proton radiography data. A nearly linear relationship between the dose perturbations and the range variations was found which indicates that measured range variations can be used to predict dose perturbations in proton therapy View full abstract»

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  • A YAP camera 40×40 mm2 with fast readout electronics

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 2302 - 2308
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (120 KB)  

    Previous papers have already demonstrated the suitability for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracers biodistribution studies on small animals, of a miniature gamma camera composed by a YAP:Ce scintillating array 4×4×1 cm3 coupled to a 3-in Hamamatsu crossed-wire anode position sensitive photomultiplier (PSPMT). Some modifications have been applied to the imaging system readout in order to adapt its utilization for specific purposes (i.e. SPECT radiopharmaceutical testing) and to reduce construction costs so that a larger scale production may be feasible. In particular, the system introduced here is based on a resistive chain readout and an integrated acquisition electronics. The intrinsic performance of this new version has been analyzed and compared to the previous system, which had a single-wire readout. Results showed that the basic characteristics of the imaging system remain substantially unchanged in this simplified version, while a faster count rate is achieved. A test on a biological sample performed with the YAP camera both in single-wire and in resistive chain readout modality is also presented, which shows the system high performance in comparison to the Auger camera View full abstract»

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IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science focuses on all aspects of the theory and applications of nuclear science and engineering, including instrumentation for the detection and measurement of ionizing radiation; particle accelerators and their controls; nuclear medicine and its application; effects of radiation on materials, components, and systems; reactor instrumentation and controls; and measurement of radiation in space.

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