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Control Systems, IEEE

Issue 5 • Date Oct 1998

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Displaying Results 1 - 7 of 7
  • An ion-sense engine fine-tuner

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 43 - 52
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1344 KB)  

    The paper presents a real-time closed loop demonstration of spark advance control by interpretation of ionization current signals. Such control is shown to be able to handle variations in air humidity, which is a major factor influencing burn rates, and consequently pressure buildup and useful work transferred via piston to drive shaft. This leads to a clear improvement in engine efficiency compared to traditional systems using only engine speed and load. Inspired by the type of challenges and potential usefulness in interpretation of ionization current signals, the paper focuses on closed loop ignition control by ionization current interpretation. The topics discussed include: the basics of ionization currents; spark advance control, especially principles relating pressure information to efficiency; and the structure of the ion-sense spark advance controller. The experimental demonstrations and some conclusions are presented View full abstract»

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  • Torque management of engines with variable cam timing

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 34 - 42
    Cited by:  Papers (11)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (888 KB)  

    This paper describe the variable cam timing (VCT) system which addresses both the drivability and emission performance by utilising an electric hydraulic mechanism to rotate the camshaft relative to the crankshaft in order to retard the cam timing with respect to the intake and exhaust strokes of the engine. By retarding the exhaust valve closing further into the intake stroke, more exhaust gas is drawn into the cylinder providing internal exhaust gas recirculation. In this manner, the amount of residual gas trapped in the cylinder at the end of the exhaust stroke is controlled by cam timing, suppressing NOx formation and reducing the pumping losses. Furthermore, this residual contains some unburned hydrocarbons; consequently, retaining it in the cylinder through two combustion cycles also reduces hydrocarbon emissions. In addition to the reduction of NOx and HC emissions, variable cam timing permits the engine designer to optimize cam timing over a wide range of engine operating conditions View full abstract»

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  • Automotive engine diagnosis and control via nonlinear estimation

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 84 - 99
    Cited by:  Papers (24)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1768 KB)  

    The aim of this article is to explore a possible approach to the problem of designing control and diagnostic strategies for future generations of automotive engines. The work described focuses on the use of physical models to estimate unmeasured or unmeasurable variables and parameters, to be used for control and diagnostic purposes. We introduce the mean value engine model used, present a conceptual strategy for combined control and diagnosis focusing mainly on the problem of air fuel ratio control, review basic concepts related to estimation in nonlinear systems, and propose various forms of the estimators that serve different objectives. We illustrate estimation problems in the context of a simplified engine model, assuming both linear and nonlinear measurement of oxygen concentration in the exhaust. Some simulation and experimental results related to estimation-based control and diagnosis are shown View full abstract»

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  • Dynamic modeling and control of hybrid electric vehicle powertrain systems

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 17 - 33
    Cited by:  Papers (70)  |  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2316 KB)  

    This paper describes the mathematical modeling, analysis, and simulation of a dynamic automatic manual layshaft transmission and dry clutch combination powertrain model, and corresponding coordinated control laws synthesized using a conventional SI ICE powerplant-alternator combination, a dry clutch and manual transmission/differential, variable field alternator, brakes, and complete vehicle longitudinal dynamics with tire-road interface characterization. The conventional power train model is validated using experimental test data confirming accurate emulation of dynamic components of the pre-hybridized vehicle. In addition, the development of dynamic series and parallel hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) powertrain models and corresponding coordinated control laws are described. A discussion of the key issues associated with coordinated control law development is provided. Simulations of the dynamic behavior of two types of series HEVs are shown View full abstract»

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  • Observer-based air fuel ratio control

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 72 - 83
    Cited by:  Papers (28)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1032 KB)  

    This paper discusses the application of linear observer theory to engine control with a specific focus on observers based on exhaust measurements. The motivation for this architecture is that a direct measurement of the relevant quantity (the exhaust chemistry entering the catalyst) will typically lead to the most accurate control. A secondary motivation is the need to reduce costs. If sufficient accuracy can be obtained with the exhaust sensor providing the primary information, the cost associated with intake manifold sensors can be reduced. The basic theory is discussed and experimental results are reported that illustrate the benefits and superior performance of linear observer based control View full abstract»

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  • Control of diesel engines

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 53 - 71
    Cited by:  Papers (50)  |  Patents (23)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2188 KB)  

    This article is intended to give control engineers an overview of models and controls of diesel engines. The main emphasis is on the engine's torque generation, including all necessary ancillary devices (turbocharger, injection-system, etc.), pollutant emission and model-based controls. The paper gives a brief introduction of the basic working principles and the salient features of diesel engines and their main differences to Otto (gasoline or spark-ignited) engines are shown. The most important control tasks are then identified and their implications on engine performance are analyzed. An overview of the current state-of-the-art in industrial diesel control applications is given. It also discusses models for the simulation of transient macroscopic effects, and how these models can be simplified to be useful for controller synthesis. Finally. an outlook on possible future control issues and their role in diesel engine evolution is presented View full abstract»

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  • Using fuzzy logic in control applications: beyond fuzzy PID control

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 100 - 104
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1328 KB)  

    Fuzzy logic is used mostly to handle high-level control functions that traditional control methods do not address. This article discusses different ways that fuzzy logic can be used in high-level control functions. Specifically, we examine the use of fuzzy logic for supervisory control, for selecting discrete control actions, for identifying the operating environment, and for evaluating controller performance. The purpose of this article is to stimulate the use of fuzzy logic to provide new control functions that are outside the domain of traditional control, where fuzzy control is likely to provide the greatest payoff View full abstract»

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