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Potentials, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date Aug/Sep 1998

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
  • Java, Java, Java

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 33 - 37
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1896 KB)  

    Everyone is talking about Java. The driving force for this chatter is Java's simplicity and potential power. Java is programming language, and a language for the intranet and the World Wide Web (WWW). Java is a Write On one platform and Run on Many platforms (WORM) language. For network-friendly, platform-independent applications, Java (originally Oak) is an object oriented programming language. Java source code is compiled into a virtual machine code or bytecode. This makes the Java platform independent. It can be placed on a Web site, and executed on the client side on a PC-Intel, Mac, Motorola or UNIX-Solaris machine without recompiling. Sun Microsystems formally announced Java in May 1995. Java is the first language that has built-in capabilities for networking applications, in particular, creating dynamic Web pages. Java programs that run on the Internet Web pages are called applets. These applets are easily incorporated into Web pages. These applets are executed from homepages on remote Web sites. Java programs run interpretively on the client side. Java reduces development costs and speeds up the learning curve. Traditional client server development tools-such as Delphi, Power-Builder and Visual Basic-are losing ground to Java as a result. By the year-end of 1996, Java had moved ahead in use of both C and C++ and these application development tools View full abstract»

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  • Engineering applications of plasma science

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 4 - 8
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1688 KB)  

    Plasmas are important in such diverse fields as astrophysics, controlled fusion research, semiconductor manufacturing and laser technology. Plasma science incorporates skills from electromagnetics, thermodynamics, materials science, chemistry, electronics, mechanical design, vacuum technology and computer modeling. Plasma is involved in up to 30% of the steps in fabricating today's microprocessors. Microwave tubes are a multibillion dollar market worldwide. Plasma processing within integrated circuit manufacturing is a $2 billion/year industry in the United States alone. The author discusses some engineering applications of plasma science, including: etching; deposition/coating; surface treatment; microwave vacuum tubes; pollution and hazardous waste processing; lasers; coronas View full abstract»

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  • Forest build tree algorithms for multiple destinations

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 13 - 16
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2604 KB)  

    The multiple destination routing (MDR) problem is the essential routing problem in multicast communication networks. This problem has been proven to NP-complete, hence, we look at only heuristic algorithms that are of practical interest. Forest build tree (FBT) like algorithms are discussed and two new algorithms are presented. A performance evaluation is carried out and simulation results given View full abstract»

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  • Cold cathodes are heating up

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 9 - 12
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1184 KB)  

    One potential application of cold cathodes is flat panel displays. At present, the market for emissive displays is based on cathode ray tubes (CRTs) and liquid crystal displays (LCDs). However, these technologies do not offer the combination of bright, sharp images in a low power, lightweight and flat package. Cold cathodes should offer these advantages in the not-too-distant future. Since the international market for displays by the year 2000 is predicted to reach over $20 billion (US), an increasing number of innovative cold cathode concepts should be expected View full abstract»

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  • Trying out zero gravity

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 38 - 41
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3608 KB)  

    Discusses the NASA Reduced Gravity Student Opportunities Program. The funding of the program together with the projects involved are discussed. The principles behind microgravity experiments carried out on an aircraft are also considered View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Potentials is the magazine dedicated to undergraduate and graduate students and young professionals.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
David Tian
Carnegie Mellon University
david.tian@ieee.org