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Computer Graphics and Applications, IEEE

Issue 5 • Date Sept.-Oct. 1998

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • The Art of Chance

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 4 - 5
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  • Computer Animation for Virtual Humans

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 20 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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  • On the trail of the shadow woman: the mystery of motion capture

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 14 - 19
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (836 KB)  

    Motion capture houses throw away the person and keep the shadow-the essence of their motion-and apply that motion to animate all kinds of characters. In the past few years, as the technology has become less expensive and at the same time more accurate, MoCap has helped lessen the rigors of traditional cell animation-especially in highly cost-conscious projects like TV commercials. A MoCap studio can use both magnetic and optical capture systems. Each has certain advantages. The magnetic system handles shoots that don't need really high accuracy, and the director wants to be able to apply the data to his character in real time. Magnetic systems generally are faster at providing data to use in animation, though optical systems are generally more accurate and can track more points. That may be changing, though View full abstract»

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  • Analyzing facial expressions for virtual conferencing

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 70 - 78
    Cited by:  Papers (37)
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    The authors present a model-based algorithm that estimates 3D motion and facial expressions from 2D image sequences showing head and shoulder scenes typical of video telephone and teleconferencing applications View full abstract»

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  • Know when to fold [box designs]

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 79 - 85
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
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    Boxes made of corrugated cardboard are ubiquitous, but often overlooked. Some boxes are remarkable because they're made of a single piece of cardboard, which is neither glued nor taped. Yet they're capable of great strength, rigidity and longevity. In this article, I share a few box designs and talk a little about how I like to think about them. My goal is not so much to present specific boxes, but to get your 3D visualization skills fired up. Once you make the models and play with them and start thinking about where the pieces fold and where the clearances should be, then you can start seeing the entire shape in your head. The simple 2D layout transforms into an imminent 3D object: the template seems to want to jump up and fold itself up into a box, and you can see in your mind's eye just how cleanly everything fits and how strong and stable the result will be View full abstract»

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  • Ten more unsolved problems in computer graphics

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 86 - 89
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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    The tradition of posing unsolved problems in computer graphics goes back to Ivan Sutherland's article “Ten unsolved problems in computer graphics”, Datamation, vol. 12, no. 5, pp. 22-7 (1966). In this article, the author presents his own personal top 10: (1) novelty; (2) education; (3) systems integration; (4) simplicity; (5) better pixel arithmetic theory; (6) legacy compatibility; (7) arithmetic sloppiness; (8) antialiasing; (9) a modelling/rendering/animation challenge; and (10) finding a use for real-time 3D. Some of the problems I decry have, indeed, been solved in the theoretical sense. The problems remain unsolved in the practical sense, though, because cheap and fast solutions remain elusive. Many of the problems are more sociological and marketing issues than technical. Also, many of them have multiple parts with much overlap View full abstract»

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  • Motion control of virtual humans

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 24 - 31
    Cited by:  Papers (12)
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    The article surveys virtual humans and techniques to control the face and body. It also covers higher level interfaces for direct speech input and issues of real-time control View full abstract»

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  • Verbs and adverbs: multidimensional motion interpolation

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 32 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (123)  |  Patents (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (864 KB)  

    The article describes a system for real-time interpolated animation that addresses some of these problems. Through creating parameterized motions-which the authors call verbs parameterized by adverbs-a single authored verb produces a continuous range of subtle variations of a given motion at real-time rates. As a result, simulated figures alter their actions based on their momentary mood or in response to changes in their goals or environmental stimuli. For example, they demonstrate a walk verb that can show emotions such as happiness and sadness, and demonstrate subtle variations due to walking up or down hill while turning to the left and right. They also describe verb graphs, which act as the glue to assemble verbs and their adverbs into a runtime data structure. Verb graphs provide the means for seamless transition from verb to verb for the simulated figures within an interactive runtime system. Finally they briefly discuss the discrete event simulator that handles the runtime main loop View full abstract»

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  • Designing animal habitats within an immersive VE

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 9 - 13
    Cited by:  Papers (13)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (436 KB)  

    The authors present an immersive design application for educational use that takes a different approach. First, they focus on the small, highly specific domain of animal habitat design. Second, the system's users don't have a blank slate-they begin with an existing design. Finally, the design tools don't allow general manipulation of all design features. Instead, they're task-specific and well constrained View full abstract»

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  • Real-time animation of realistic virtual humans

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 42 - 56
    Cited by:  Papers (42)  |  Patents (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2696 KB)  

    The authors have been working on simulating virtual humans for several years. Until recently, these constructs could not act in real time. Today, however, many applications need to simulate in real time virtual humans that look realistic. They have invested considerable effort in developing and integrating several modules into a system capable of animating humans in real-time situations. This includes interactive modules for building realistic individuals and a texture-fitting method suitable for all parts of the head and body. Animating the body, including the hands and their deformations, is the key aspect of the system; to their knowledge, no competing system integrates all these functions. They also included facial animation, as demonstrated below with virtual tennis players. They have developed a single system containing all the modules needed for simulating real-time virtual humans in distant virtual environments (VEs). The system lets one rapidly clone any individual and animate the clone in various contexts. People cannot mistake virtual humans for real ones, but they think them recognizable and realistic View full abstract»

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  • Dynamically simulated characters in virtual environments

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 58 - 69
    Cited by:  Papers (22)  |  Patents (108)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1252 KB)  

    Animated characters can play the role of teachers or guides, team mates or competitors, or just provide a source of interesting motion in virtual environments. Characters in a compelling virtual environment must have a variety of complex and interesting behaviors, and be responsive to the user's actions. The difficulty of constructing such synthetic characters currently hinders the development of these environments, particularly when realism is required. The authors present one approach to populating virtual environments-using dynamic simulation to generate the motion of characters. They explore this approach's effectiveness with two virtual environments: the border collie environment, in which the user acts as a border collie to herd robots into a corral, and the Olympic bicycle race environment, in which the user participates in a bicycle race with synthetic competitors View full abstract»

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  • Flodar: flow visualization of network traffic

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 6 - 8
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (324 KB)  

    The author and his colleagues at the National Security Agency designed an application called Flodar (short for Flow Radar) that monitors the flow of network traffic. The techniques and visuals used in Flodar can apply to a variety of applications. While many flow visualizations concentrate on the path of network traffic, this system monitors the status of individual servers within the system. In their particular system, they need to monitor two types of servers: those that send information at semi-regular intervals and those that receive this information and store it temporarily, waiting for users to read or process the information within a certain time. They are not as concerned with the path the data takes to get from the sending server to the storage server. They are more concerned with ensuring the sender transmits regularly and that the information on the storage server is processed before being overwritten. Therefore, monitoring the system's timeliness remains the primary objective for Flodar View full abstract»

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IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications bridges the theory and practice of computer graphics.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
L. Miguel Encarnação
University of Iowa