By Topic

Technology and Society Magazine, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date Fall 1998

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 3 of 3
  • Technology as "Big Magic" and other Myths

    Page(s): 4 - 16
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4353 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Broadening student perspectives in engineering design courses

    Page(s): 18 - 23
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1308 KB)  

    The author gives an overview of an innovative multidisciplinary course, Design for Society, that has been offered since the spring of 1996 at Penn State Harrisburg. This course serves to introduce engineering technology and science students to the larger context of engineering and design. It attempts to broaden their perspectives on the potential for technology to serve human ends and to be seen as a useful set of tools to help society get to where it wants to be. At the same time, it shows the limitations to the viability of modern consumerist society and the need to rethink common beliefs and values. It provides some practical examples of how designers can take responsible actions for the betterment of society, both now and in the future View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Big government projects: which are successful and why?

    Page(s): 24 - 31
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2308 KB)  

    From time to time, the U.S. government has initiated a particularly large, ambitious program, not as part of the normal R&D process, which tries to anticipate future needs, but in direct response to an immediate known national need. Such programs began with the identification of a compelling goal, then created and applied knowledge and expertise for the purpose of achieving it. In some cases, this approach led to remarkably successful accomplishments for the United States and at the same time gave a very large impetus to both the application and development of technology. There are two apparent reasons for the technological benefit. First, the suitability of the related research and development was guaranteed by its direct association with the goal, so the problem of agreeing on allocation criteria was avoided. And second, having the stated goal constantly in view made it safer to make larger investments, perform bolder research and development activities, and generally surpass in scope and speed the accomplishments that would have resulted from incremental, ad hoc activities. It is natural to ask what factors made these programs successful. One characteristic of these successful U.S. programs is that they call on the utmost creative capability of the nation to accomplish a task of great importance to the country. The author considers the history of these programs, the manner in which they were accomplished, how each one was conceived, how it was conducted, and how it advanced the state of society through technology View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

IEEE Technology and Society Magazine covers the impact of technology (as embodied by the fields of interest in IEEE) on society

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Katina Michael
School of Information Systems and Technology
University of Wollongong