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Network, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date May-June 1998

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • Active And Programmable Networks [Guest Editorial]

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 10 - 11
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (351 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Commentaries on "Active networking and end-to-end arguments"

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 66 - 71
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (924 KB)  

    This article is a collection of short commentaries by recognized networking experts offering their perspectives on the relation between active networks and "end-to-end arguments". The first commentary, by Bhattacharjee, Calvert, and Zegura, frames the question and makes a case arguing that active networking does not conflict with end-to-end argument principles. These authors are leading a research... View full abstract»

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  • Mobile agents - enabling technology for active intelligent network implementation

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 53 - 60
    Cited by:  Papers (29)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3448 KB)  

    The emerging notion of active networks describes the general vision of communication network evolution, where the network nodes become active because they take part in the computation of applications and provision of customized services. In this context mobile agent technology and programmable switches are considered as enabling technologies. This article looks at the impact of mobile agent techno... View full abstract»

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  • The 802.3z Gigabit Ethernet Standard

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 6 - 7
    Cited by:  Papers (7)  |  Patents (27)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (396 KB)  

    Considers standards development in the IEEE 802.3z Gigabit Ethernet Task Force, part of the IEEE 802.3 CSMA/CD Working Group. IEEE Std 802.3z-1998 was formally approved by the IEEE Standards Board on June 25th, 1998. IEEE Std 802.3z, extends the operating speed of the world's most popular local area network to 1 billion bits per second (1000 Mb/s) for interconnecting high-performance switches, rou... View full abstract»

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  • ACC: using active networking to enhance feedback congestion control mechanisms

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 61 - 65
    Cited by:  Papers (15)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1476 KB)  

    Active congestion control (ACC) uses active networking (AN) technology to make feedback congestion control more responsive to network congestion. Current end-to-end feedback congestion control systems detect and relieve congestion only at endpoints. ACC includes programs in each data packet that tell routers how to react to congestion without incurring the round-trip delay that reduces feedback ef... View full abstract»

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  • A secure active network environment architecture: realization in SwitchWare

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 37 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (25)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2044 KB)  

    An active network is a network infrastructure which is programmable on a per-user or even per-packet basis. Increasing the flexibility of such network infrastructures invites new security risks. Coping with these security risks represents the most fundamental contribution of active network research. The security concerns can be divided into those which affect the network as a whole and those which... View full abstract»

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  • The Tempest-a practical framework for network programmability

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 20 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (28)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2792 KB)  

    The Tempest framework provides a programmable network environment by allowing the dynamic introduction and modification of network services at two levels of granularity. First, the switchlet and associated virtual network concepts enable the safe introduction of alternative control architectures into an operational network. The timescales over which such new control architectures can be introduced... View full abstract»

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  • The SwitchWare active network architecture

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 29 - 36
    Cited by:  Papers (67)  |  Patents (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1528 KB)  

    Active networks must balance the flexibility of a programmable network infrastructure against the safety and security requirements inherent in sharing that infrastructure. Furthermore, this balance must be achieved while maintaining the usability of the network. The SwitchWare active network architecture is a novel approach to achieving this balance using three layers: active packets, which contai... View full abstract»

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  • An update on ATM traffic management

    Publication Year: 1998
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (800 KB)  

    The Traffic Management (TM) group at the ATM Forum has been fairly focused on developing a new service called guaranteed frame rate (GFR) service. This service is expected to be positioned as an intermediate alternative between the available bit rate (ABR) service, which uses a closed-loop feedback control framework, and the unspecified bit rate (UBR) service, which provides no assurances whatsoev... View full abstract»

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  • Introducing new Internet services: why and how

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 12 - 19
    Cited by:  Papers (41)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1600 KB)  

    Active networks permit applications to inject programs into the nodes of local and, more important, wide area networks. This supports faster service innovation by making it easier to deploy new network services. In this article, we discuss both the potential impact of active network services on applications and how such services can be built and deployed. We explore the impact by suggesting sample... View full abstract»

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  • Active network support for multicast applications

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 46 - 52
    Cited by:  Papers (17)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1540 KB)  

    This article analyzes the necessity and feasibility of designing a protocol for active networks that supports multicasting applications with different characteristics in terms of data loss tolerance. The article begins with a presentation of the service elements required by multicast applications, and from this study a network service description is given. The advantages of providing this service ... View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

As currently defined, IEEE Network covers the following areas: 1. network protocols and architectures, 2. Protocol design and validation, 3. Communication software and its development and test, 4. Network control and signalling, 5. network management, 6. Practical network implementations including local area networks, (LANs), metropolitan area networks (MANs), and wide  area networks, (WANs), 7. Switching and processing in integrated (voice/data) networks and network components, 8. Micro-to-host communication.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief

Nei Kato
Tohoku University, Japan