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IEEE Software

Issue 4 • Date July-Aug. 1998

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Displaying Results 1 - 22 of 22
  • Predictions and Farewells [From the Editor]

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):6 - 9
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Preserve or Redesign Legacy Systems [Guest Editor's Introduction]

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):14 - 17
    Cited by:  Papers (11)  |  Patents (3)
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Open Source: Netscape Pops The Hood [In The News]

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):79 - 82
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The Future is Object-Oriented...for Now [Bookshelf]

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):87 - 88
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • A Sharp Modeling Approach [Bookshelf]

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):88 - 89
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (175 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Stylish Guide to Modula-3 [Bookshelf]

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):89 - 90
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Intermediate-Level Linux Guide [Bookshelf]

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s): 90
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Do systems engineering? Who, Me?

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):65 - 66
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (112 KB)

    Software engineers are accustomed to having systems engineers furnish them with allocated requirements and changes to those requirements. All too frequently, however, the systems engineering department tosses these items over the wall-along with a tight deadline-without engaging the software engineer's timely participation View full abstract»

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  • Optimizing value and cost in requirements analysis

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):74 - 78
    Cited by:  Papers (33)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (144 KB)

    When creating a software system, developers are often faced with a long list of requirements and a limited budget. The article gives developers a method to balance the cost and value of the requirements, and then implement the most cost-effective set. The author created a variant of the “knapsack” approach that reduces the complexity of earlier approaches; he presents two case studies ... View full abstract»

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  • Restoring a legacy: lessons learned

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):28 - 33
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (332 KB)

    Rebuilding a legacy system has some parallels to the restoration of a work of art. The authors draw upon this comparison to illustrate the challenges they faced in redesigning a telephony system. The restoration involved far more than updating the code, the development team also had to understand the existing architecture, add new functionality, and develop a long-term hardware migration plan. The... View full abstract»

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  • Across disciplines: risk, design, method, process, and tools

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):61 - 64
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (216 KB)

    In the search for solutions to make software development more predictable and controllable, one often looks for parallels in other disciplines such as architecture, bridge construction, and so on. The article looks at software development from the perspective of the electrical industry. Inspired by their management tradition, ATH techniek b.v. has learned to apply proven management techniques to s... View full abstract»

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  • The year 2000 bug: a forgotten lesson

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):91 - 93, 95
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (144 KB)

    While the Doomsday clock ticks down to the year 2000, the many books, articles, sales pitches, and Internet sites dealing with the Y2K problem continue to miss the most important lesson from this so-called bug. Understanding that lesson requires that we find the answers to two questions: why is there a Y2K bug and why has it been ignored for more than 30 years? View full abstract»

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  • Is software quality visible in the code

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):69 - 73
    Cited by:  Papers (5)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (132 KB)

    Finding and fixing software code defects is crucial to product quality. It also, however, often proves difficult and time-consuming, especially late in the development cycle. While some believe that code analysis provides a simple way to detect quality defects, the authors argue otherwise. To prove their point, they analyzed data from error reports, and their results show that code analysis detect... View full abstract»

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  • Maintaining component-based systems

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):22 - 27
    Cited by:  Papers (21)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (128 KB)

    As we continue to move toward component-based software engineering, software development will become more like traditional manufacturing: developers will code less and design and integrate more. The author argues that to reap the benefits of component-based development: reduced time to market, more user choice, and lower costs, we must rethink our software maintenance strategies. He gives a wide-r... View full abstract»

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  • Managing OO projects better

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):50 - 60
    Cited by:  Papers (9)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (228 KB)

    The author reveals that estimation of effort is key to managing OO development projects, then documents a few rules of thumb for doing this. One lesson he's learned from using these rules is that estimates for a whole project are not reliable if estimates for subcomponents are simply added up. As the project size increases, so does the overhead for communication and general interaction. He goes be... View full abstract»

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  • Maintenance: less is not more

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):67 - 68
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (72 KB)

    Dekleva's (1992) study confirms that if you build a system well, it will be maintained more than if you don't. Why! Because maintenance is about product enhancement and a well-built system is easier to enhance. So, if you still believe we can eliminate maintenance by doing our development jobs better, the author has a different view. That's not how it works. When it comes to software maintenance, ... View full abstract»

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  • How to evaluate legacy system maintenance

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):34 - 42
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (212 KB)

    Drawing on extensive data from the NASA Space Shuttle's guidance software, the author proposes a method for evaluating the effectiveness of legacy software maintenance efforts. He provides several formulas for tracking maintenance stability, defined as increasing functionality with decreasing failures over time, and offers data that supports their validity. He also provides tips for applying his f... View full abstract»

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  • Why you should use routines...routinely

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):96, 94 - 95
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (112 KB)

    As an undergraduate computer science student, the author thought that the main reason to create new routines, instead of leaving all the code in one big routine, was to avoid duplicate code. This is undoubtedly the most popular reason for creating a routine, and it's a good one. Similar code in two routines is a warning sign. David Parnas says that if you use copy and paste while you're coding, yo... View full abstract»

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  • Software lives too long

    Publication Year: 1998
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (288 KB)

    Old programs represent yesterday's technology. We have has learned quite a bit about software engineering methodology in the last few years. We now know, for example, that requirements traceability is central to program maintainability-if we don't know what a program is supposed to do we cannot maintain it. We know that calendar years have four digits in them, not two. We know that data can best b... View full abstract»

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  • Homeopathic remedies for team toxicity

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):43 - 45
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (104 KB)

    By creating better goals and results definition, by clarifying and checking on rules, and by ensuring processes are well integrated and documented, you can avoid workplace toxins. But the real secret to long-term project health lies in ensuring that every team member feels it appropriate to their role to expose toxic levels of team activity and to name a solution. You can ensure this by implementi... View full abstract»

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  • Software should live longer

    Publication Year: 1998
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (172 KB)

    Software lives longer than most organizations expect-a mean age of 9.4 years for applications of fundamental importance to the organization, according to one study. And it is living longer than before, up from 4.75 years in 1980. Nonetheless, software should live longer yet. Long-living software has many advantages. First, as a software application survives, it works. It benefits the organization ... View full abstract»

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  • Validation, verification, and testing: diversity rules

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):46 - 49
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (128 KB)

    Many software project managers try to decide whether to enhance reliability by performing detailed inspections or by doing execution-based testing using operational profiles. The authors regard this as a false choice. Operational-profile-based testing is an important method, but it is not a simple, cost-effective panacea. Instead, they suggest a better approach: a diverse validation, verification,... View full abstract»

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Diomidis Spinellis
Athens University of Economics and Business
28is Oktovriou 76
Athina 104 33, Greece
dds@computer.org