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Software, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date May-June 1998

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Displaying Results 1 - 21 of 21
  • More Words Of Wisdom

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 6 - 8
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  • Migrating Software To The World Wide Web

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 18 - 21
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
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  • Of Machines, Methods, And Madness

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 42 - 45
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  • Java, The Universe, And Everything

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 115 - 116
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  • Worldwide Perspective On Software Quality Assurance And Measurement

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 116 - 117
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  • Succeeding With Pseudosilver Bullets

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 117 - 118
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  • Hallucinations at 37,000 feet [project management]

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 105 - 107
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    While on a flight from LA to New York, the author had some very strange ideas floating around in his head. He can trace their germination back to two novels he read on previous flights, both about project management: The Deadline, by T. DeMarco (1997), and The Critical Chain, by E. Goldratt (1997). In the former, the hero is an intrepid software project manager; in the latter he is a brilliant project consultant. Focusing on these books, the author examines various project management issues View full abstract»

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  • An OO database migrates to the Web

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 22 - 30
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (1)
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    The authors faced the dual challenge of first converting a relational database to the OO paradigm, then migrating it to the Web. They describe the procedures and technologies they used. The basic architecture of the resulting system is presented. The project goal was to create a Java based mapping client that would provide display and query capabilities for a set of geographic objects (features) that would be retrieved from the Smalltalk mapping prototype acting as a server. We planned to base communication on the Corba specification. We also planned to keep the remote fetching of objects completely transparent to the end user, who would be able to manipulate the features as if they were local View full abstract»

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  • Y2K: don't play it again, Sam

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 100 - 102
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Judging by how many Year 2000 press releases cross the author's desk each month, making software Y2K compliant is a booming business. Warnings of calamity mixed with promises of an easy fix-its the same old tune over and over again. How much faith would you have in the legal profession, for example, if legions of attorneys aggressively sought to take on cases that involved suing their fellow lawyers for malpractice? Yet this is uncomfortably like what many in our industry do today: bill clients to fix problems caused by other software developers. If we are ever to be taken seriously as a profession or engineering discipline, we must look past the Y2K hype and hysteria to determine how the problem emerged, why it emerged, and what we can do to avoid similar situations in the future View full abstract»

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  • Healing the ailing workplace

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 97 - 99
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    Does your workplace offer a healthy environment, meeting critical human requirements? If not, what can you do? Owning the five freedoms lets us develop healthy relationships and thus achieve “congruence”, both inner and interpersonal. Six steps move us toward congruence; these apply to individuals and systems, and they begin with the individual: awareness, acceptance, authorship, articulation, application, and activism View full abstract»

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  • Feasibility studies

    Publication Year: 1998
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Is a cancelled project a bad project? After surveying about 8,000 IT projects, the Standish Group reported that about 30 percent of all projects were cancelled (“Charting the Seas of Information Technology”, 1994). Capers Jones reports that the average cancelled project in the US is about a year behind schedule and has consumed 200 percent of its expected budget by the time it's cancelled (Assessment and Control of Software Risks, Yourdon Press, 1994). Jones estimates that work on cancelled projects comprises about 15 percent of total US software efforts, amounting to as much as $14 billion per year in 1993 dollars. In spite of these grim statistics, cancelling a project is, in itself, neither good nor bad. Cancelling a project later than necessary is bad. The trick is to perform the minimum amount of work necessary to determine that the project should be cancelled View full abstract»

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  • The nature of system change [software]

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 87 - 90
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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    M. Lehman's (Proc. IEEE, vol.68, no.9, p.1060-76, 1980) notion of programs can be used to describe a system in terms of the way it relates to the environment in which it operates. Unlike programs handled in the abstract, the real world contains uncertainties and concepts we do not understand completely. The more dependent a system is on the real world for its requirements, the more likely it is to change. Systems are described as S-systems (formally defined by and derivable from a Specification), P-systems (based on a Practical abstraction of the problem) and E-systems (Embedded in the real world and changing as the world does), characterized by the way the software interacts with its environment and by the degree to which the environment and underlying problem can change. Using these ideas, we can design our systems to be flexible, and plan our maintenance releases and new versions so that we understand and control our software, rather than merely react when problems arise View full abstract»

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  • The object-powered Web

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 57 - 62
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (1)
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    The convergence of Web and object oriented technologies will allow applications to transcend conventional boundaries of platform, organizational function, enterprise, industry, and geography to leverage the power of distributed computing. For developers, this will mean the ability to use new or legacy code-possibly running on transcontinentally located machines-to build distributed, three tier client server applications. For end users, this will mean the ability to integrate information needs across and beyond the enterprise. For the computing world, this will mean applications that transcend conventional boundaries of platform, organizational function, enterprise, industry, and geography, leveraging the true power of distributed computing View full abstract»

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  • Does OO sync with how we think?

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 46 - 54
    Cited by:  Papers (28)
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    Is object orientation an imperfect paradigm for reliable coding? Worse, does it focus on the wrong part of the life cycle? The author thinks so and explains why. Given that corrective-maintenance costs already dominate the software life cycle and look set to increase significantly, the author argues that reliability in the form of reducing such costs is the most important software improvement goal. Yet, the results are not promising when we review recent corrective-maintenance data for big systems in general and for OO systems, in this case written in C++. The author asserts that any paradigm that is capable of decomposing a system into large numbers of small components-as frequently occurs in both OO and conventional systems-is fundamentally wrong. Thus, because both paradigms suffer from this flaw, we should expect no particular benefits to accrue from an OO system over a non-OO system. Further, a detailed comparison of OO programming and the human thought processes involved in short and long term memory suggests that OO aligns with human thinking limitations indifferently at best. In the case studies described, OO is no more than a different paradigm, and emphatically not a better one, although it is not possible to apportion blame between the OO paradigm itself and its C++ implementation View full abstract»

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  • Building more usable APIs

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 78 - 86
    Cited by:  Papers (22)  |  Patents (11)
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    Traditional software usability methods can help us design more understandable and more useful application program interfaces (APIs). They also give us information we need to write good API reference documentation-before we invest in either programmers or writers and before evolving a large body of code or content View full abstract»

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  • Understanding and managing OOT adoption

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 91 - 96
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    Why do so many companies hesitate to adopt object-oriented technology (OOT)? The authors use organizational learning theory to illuminate the obstacles involved, and then offer guidelines that can help managers mitigate them View full abstract»

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  • Managing a Y2K project-starting now

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 63 - 71
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    As the year 2000 draws near, solutions to the Year 2000 (Y2K) problem seem both abundant and elusive. At this late date, Y2K problems require fast, flawless solutions. This article sets forth a practical work plan for assessing and correcting problems in existing application programs View full abstract»

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  • Leadership challenges for the future [of the software industry]

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 72 - 77
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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    The software industry's phenomenal growth over the past 10 years presents significant challenges for management. The author describes how management issues in software differ from those in hardware development, and he proposes 10 areas of leadership competency that software managers need in order to succeed: (1) business literacy; (2) technology vision; (3) cross-functional orientation; (4) strategic partnership management; (5) customer relations; (6) total quality discipline; (7) market decisiveness; (8) technical teamwork; (9) knowledge development; and (10) leadership versatility View full abstract»

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  • Defining quality intuitively

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 103 - 104, 107
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    This is the decade of software quality. In the 1980s we focused on trying to increase productivity; in the 1990s we strive to create higher quality products. Quality is not about user satisfaction, product conformance, or costs and schedules-nor is it solely about defects. Instead, there is a well defined, intuitive relationship between quality and those other product traits, one that clearly distinguishes among them. Further, the detail level definition of software quality concerns the attribute set that each product should have, a collection that must be prioritized differently for different project types View full abstract»

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  • A new way to query GISs on the Web

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 31 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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    We created a distributed open spatial query mechanism (Geo) that gives users access to cross-platform, cross-vendor geographic information systems via the Internet. A Java implementation provides maximum flexibilty for Web based clients View full abstract»

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  • Watch your language!

    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 55 - 56
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
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    Sure, object orientation is unnatural-computer programming in any language is. We must rely on good principles, good tools, and good languages. This author tells L. Hatton to blame C++ and its culture for the bad rap against OO, and to look elsewhere for a workable OO language. He suggests comparing C to a better OOP language. In his view, Eiffel fosters a culture embodying the best tendencies of OOP Most importantly, Eiffel offers programmers the ability to specify formally, at the implementation level, the behavior of a class. Several companies have reported that such specifications, written in Eiffel, can greatly improve the reliability of large scale software systems View full abstract»

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Diomidis Spinellis
Athens University of Economics and Business
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