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Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date Sept. 1989

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Displaying Results 1 - 7 of 7
  • Status and trends in biomedical engineering education

    Page(s): 9 - 17
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    An overview of graduate and undergraduate programs is given, including a brief history of each. With respect to undergraduate studies, the issues of accreditation, department status versus option programs, employment, registration, and medical and professional school opportunities are examined. Enrollment trends are examined. A survey of biomedical engineering textbooks and a bibliography containing 102 references are given in an appendix.<> View full abstract»

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  • Research directions in biomedical engineering

    Page(s): 18 - 26
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    The role of biomedical engineering and developments that affect it are outlined. Research areas that the authors believe will be of major importance at the beginning of the next century are discussed. They are: systems science and integrated biology; biomedical engineering in the cardiovascular system; biomaterials (metals, ceramics, and polymers); artificial organs; instrumentation and sensors; medical imaging (radiography, ultrasonic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and other techniques); biomedical computing; biomechanics; and rehabilitation. Some new areas for biomedical engineering research (molecular biology, minimally invasive surgery, home health care, and geriatric care) are examined.<> View full abstract»

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  • The medical device industry and the biomedical engineer: current status and future trends

    Page(s): 27 - 32
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    The role of new and existing technology in the development of medical devices is examined. The impact of competition and economic and regulatory pressures is assessed. The identification of clinical needs is discussed. These include the needs to reduce liability, find less invasive alternatives to surgery, improve the quality of life, and prevent disease. Career opportunities are considered in some detail.<> View full abstract»

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  • Regulatory and other public policy issues

    Page(s): 33 - 40
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    Regulatory and other public policy issues in the future of biomedical engineering, as they relate to the development and use of medical devices, are discussed. At the federal level, agencies that directly influence the application of medical technology include the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), with its clinical trials and premarket and regulatory authority, and the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA), with its reimbursement policy. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Department of Commerce can have a considerable impact on corporate profitability, which is a driving force for most new technology and new product introductions. Another area of public policy that has been cited as significantly influencing health care and medical device development, namely, civil litigation, is also considered. To illustrate the issues, the impact of the regulatory environment on the application of computer software to a wide variety of medical products is examined. The humanistic and ethical problems brought about by technological advances are discussed. Ten key technologies that are likely to have the greatest importance in the next few years and ten external influences on the future of the medical device technology industry that have been identified by the Health Industry Manufacturers Association are described.<> View full abstract»

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  • Chaos theory for the biomedical engineer

    Page(s): 41 - 45
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    A brief introduction to chaos theory is provided. Definitions of chaos and attributes of chaos and fractals are discussed. Several general examples are examined, and fractals are introduced with a brief look at the Mandelbrot and Julia sets. Biomedical examples of chaotic behaviour and fractals are presented.<> View full abstract»

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  • Biological effects of power frequency electric and magnetic fields

    Page(s): 46 - 47
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    The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) has made an analysis of six recent major scientific committee reports dealing with the biological effects of exposure to electric and magnetic fields associated with electric power distribution and utilization. The conclusions drawn from these committee reports are presented in this summary.<> View full abstract»

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  • Engineering and the law-the wages of sin: preventing punitive damages

    Page(s): 50 - 51
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    The author discusses the common themes in several recent cases holding medical device manufacturers liable for punitive damages. He points out that current medical device design and manufacturing standards prevent clearly dangerous products from staying in the marketplace, creating the legal expectation that devices should be risk-free. A court that expects devices to be risk-free may misunderstand the inevitable adverse product reports that accompany rigorous product testing. Therefore, device manufacturers must anticipate and manage these misunderstandings during product development if they are to appear credible before the court. A framework for a preventive law plan to minimize the risk of punitive damage awards is presented.<> View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine contains articles on current technologies and methods used in biomedical and clinical engineering.

 

This Magazine ceased publication in 2010. The current retitled publication is IEEE Pulse.

Full Aims & Scope