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Software Engineering Journal

Issue 6 • Date Nov 1995

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Displaying Results 1 - 7 of 7
  • Backward error recovery via conversations in Ada

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 219 - 232
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1000 KB)  

    An approach is proposed for using backward error recovery in Ada. The advantages and disadvantages of Ada are not discussed, nor are new run-time algorithms for Ada proposed, but a practical method is offered for using backward recovery and software diversity within this language. The authors believe that Ada has sufficient facilities to allow the use of software diversity to develop fault-tolerant systems. However, previous researchers have noticed problems in attempting to use this possibility, and restrictive rules are necessary to avoid these problems. `Conversations' for co-ordinated backward recovery of concurrent processes are considered and the following proposals are made: a restricted scheme similar to Kim's (1982) `concurrent recovery block', but providing for deadlines on the execution of the diverse modules; programming rules for applying this scheme to Ada procedures; and a way for automatically enforcing these rules through a source code pre-processor. Two advantages of this scheme are its functioning within this widely used conventional industrial language and its suitability for real-time systems of an iterative type View full abstract»

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  • Software Engineering Journal 1994 (vol. 9) And 1995 (vol. 10) Author Index

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 267 - 268
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  • Integrated FDT-based protocol verification system

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 233 - 244
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1152 KB)  

    A communication protocol is a set of rules that govern interactions and co-ordination among communicating entities in distributed systems and computer networks. Therefore, deriving error-free protocols is crucial to ensure reliable distributed systems and computer networks. A protocol verification software tool to design error-free protocols is presented. The extended communicating finite state machine (ECFSM) model, which belongs to the state transition model, is widely used to formally specify protocols with context variables and predicates. Global state reachability analysis is one of the most straightforward ways to verify communication protocols specified in the state transition model. By modifying a CFSM-based reduction technique to be ECFSM-based, then integrating with an ECFSM-based reduction technique, a new protocol verification technique for ECFSM-based n-entity protocols is proposed. The integrated ECFSM-based verification technique can be directly applied to ISO's Estelle, which is an ECFSM-based formal description technique (FDT). With this technique, an integrated FDT-based protocol verification system (IFPVS) is developed, which consists of an Estelle translator, a global state analyser and a graphical user interface View full abstract»

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  • Approach to constructing software unit testing tools

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 245 - 252
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (672 KB)  

    Software unit testing studies how to test a portion of a program, called a software unit, which may be a procedure, a function or a collection of procedures or functions. Automated test drivers have been used to control the execution of the unit under test. When using test drivers, software stubs need to be constructed to replace all procedures called by the unit under test as the unit has been isolated from its operational environment. However, the automatic construction of stubs have not yet been achieved, and manual production of stubs proves to be difficult and time-consuming. An approach is presented called the direct test access method, for constructing software unit testing tools which provide the same capabilities as the automated test drivers but avoids the overhead of constructing stubs View full abstract»

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  • Software Engineering: A Practitioner's Approach [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 266
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  • Reliability estimation from appropriate testing of plant protection software

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 206 - 218
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1396 KB)  

    Plant protection software may be realistically tested using inputs from a plant model before its initial use, or when it is not feasible to take the plant into certain fault conditions. If statistical estimation of software reliability is to be performed using the test results, it is not sufficient for the plant model to produce inputs which are simply correct in the sense that the plant could have produced them. In addition, the operational distribution of the input space must be simulated. This paper illustrates how to perform such a simulation, by developing an example in which an existing non-random plant model is randomised to simulate the operational distribution of the software. In addition, two methods of estimating the probability of failure on demand (PFD) for a program are reported. Both methods estimate a pfd given results from dynamic testing, during which the program is exercised according to its operational distribution. The first method is standard and has been used previously in the context of software testing. The second estimation method has been developed recently within a program of Nuclear Electric for research into software reliability testing. The distinguishing foundational assumptions of the two methods are discussed View full abstract»

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  • `Engineering' the software in systems

    Publication Year: 1995 , Page(s): 253 - 265
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1236 KB)  

    Describes a method and notation for designing the software in embedded and other reactive systems. The design method is described in the context of a structured life-cycle, which recognises both functional and non-functional requirements, and it is illustrated by application to a substantial example. Mainly, for reasons of reuse and maintenance, an object-oriented solution is an implementation goal. The method focuses on producing software which is fit for its intended purpose in terms of user functionality, while being concerned with other aspects of product quality. It also seeks to efficiently utilise the varied skills and experience in a project team, and assist the team in distributing and meeting responsibilities. Commercially available CASE tools are adapted to support the method View full abstract»

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