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IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering

Issue 1 • Date Jan. 1998

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Displaying Results 1 - 7 of 7
  • Author index

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):93 - 95
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Formal verification of concurrent programs using the Larch prover

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):46 - 62
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (248 KB)

    The paper describes the use of the Larch prover to verify concurrent programs. The chosen specification environment is UNITY, whose proposed model can be fruitfully applied to a wide variety of problems and modified or extended for special purposes. Moreover, UNITY provides a high level of abstraction to express solutions to parallel programming problems. We investigate how the UNITY methodology c... View full abstract»

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  • Evolution of object behavior using context relations

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):79 - 92
    Cited by:  Papers (16)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (364 KB)

    A collection of design patterns was described by E. Gamma et al. (1994). Each pattern ensures that a certain system aspect can vary over time, for example the operations that can be applied to an object or the algorithm of a method. The patterns are described by constructs such as the inheritance and reference relations, attempting to emulate more dynamic relationships. As a result, the design pat... View full abstract»

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  • SOFL: a formal engineering methodology for industrial applications

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):24 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (28)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (652 KB)

    Formal methods have yet to achieve wide industrial acceptance for several reasons. They are not well integrated into established industrial software processes, their application requires significant abstraction and mathematical skills, and existing tools do not satisfactorily support the entire formal software development process. We have proposed a language called SOFL (Structured-Object-based-fo... View full abstract»

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  • Component based design of multitolerant systems

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):63 - 78
    Cited by:  Papers (31)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (212 KB)

    The concept of multitolerance abstracts problems in system dependability and provides a basis for improved design of dependable systems. In the abstraction, each source of undependability in the system is represented as a class of faults, and the corresponding ability of the system to deal with that undependability source is represented as a type of tolerance. Multitolerance thus refers to the abi... View full abstract»

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  • Experiences using lightweight formal methods for requirements modeling

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):4 - 14
    Cited by:  Papers (56)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (520 KB)

    The paper describes three case studies in the lightweight application of formal methods to requirements modeling for spacecraft fault protection systems. The case studies differ from previously reported applications of formal methods in that formal methods were applied very early in the requirements engineering process to validate the evolving requirements. The results were fed back into the proje... View full abstract»

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  • Lessons from using Z to specify a software tool

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):15 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (164 KB)

    The authors were recently involved in the development of a COBOL parser (G. Ostrolenk et al., 1994), specified formally in Z. The type of problem tackled was well suited to a formal language. The specification process was part of a life cycle characterized by the front loading of effort in the specification stage and the inclusion of a statistical testing stage. The specification was found to be e... View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tse-eic@computer.org