Computer

Issue 2 • Feb. 1998

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 13 of 13
  • Exploring steganography: Seeing the unseen

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):26 - 34
    Cited by:  Papers (344)  |  Patents (10)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2330 KB)

    Steganography is the art of hiding information in ways that prevent the detection of hidden messages. It includes a vast array of secret communications methods that conceal the message's very existence. These methods include invisible inks, microdots, character arrangement, digital signatures, covert channels, and spread spectrum communications. Steganography and cryptography are cousins in the sp... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Optics: a maturing technology for better computing

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):36 - 37
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (115 KB)

    This paper presents a tutorial introduction to the field of optical information processing, in particular, digital optical computing. It presents current trends in optical computing research, in the hope of a closer interaction with the broader computer science and engineering community. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Development of free-space digital optics in computing

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):38 - 44
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (272 KB)

    To someone with an electronics or computer science background, many of optical computing's concepts may seem outlandish. Optics grew out of applied physics and still retains many aspects of that heritage. This is in contrast to digital computing's roots in electronics. Recent efforts have been made to bring optical computing more in line with microelectronic engineering. Perhaps that will speed th... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Optical processing paradigms for electronic computers

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):45 - 51
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (146 KB)

    Even if electronics were to reach some natural law, the authors state that photonics is not ready to replace electronics as the new platform for digital data processing. On the other hand, they say, photonics can greatly enhance the performance of electronic computers. Photonics already contributes to the fields of data storage and data communication. The missing link, however, between storage and... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Holographic data storage

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):52 - 60
    Cited by:  Papers (60)  |  Patents (15)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (143 KB)

    Research into and the development of data storage devices is a race to keep up with the continuing demand for more capacity, more density, and faster readout rates. Improvements in conventional memory technologies-magnetic hard disk drives, optical disks, and semiconductor memories-have managed to keep pace with the demand for bigger, faster memories. However, there is strong evidence that these t... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Optically interconnected parallel computing systems

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):61 - 68
    Cited by:  Papers (11)  |  Patents (5)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (442 KB)

    Tomorrow's systems will need high-bandwidth and dense communication paths at various levels. Commercial high-performance computers are now beginning to use optical interconnections at the inter-cabinet level. These connections usually consist of optical fiber ribbons, with each fiber carrying signals at 1 to 2 Gbit/s over distances of 200 to 300 m. The aggregate bandwidth is as much as 30 Gbit/s. ... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Free-space interconnects for high-performance optoelectronic switching

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):69 - 75
    Cited by:  Papers (5)  |  Patents (8)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (157 KB)

    The authors describe the two architectures they have developed that use and demonstrate free-space optical interconnects for digital logic: a high-performance optoelectronic computing module and a second-generation digital optoelectronic computer. The low-power, high-performance optoelectronic computing (HPOC) module was designed for switching and data processing applications. Its architecture use... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • 1998 IEEE Fellows

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):79 - 81
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (142 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The IEEE-SA: a new era for standards

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):106 - 110
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (308 KB)

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Toward systems ecology

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):107 - 110
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (199 KB)

    Can we adapt our understanding of bioecological systems to develop efficient, effective and sustainable man-made systems? It is perhaps not an overstatement to say that sustainable human development is unrealistic without major reliance on information technology. Yet, without a cohesive systems ecology to guide the use of information, how can we expect to manage today's complex systems? Whether th... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Microdynamics of process evolution

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):111 - 113
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (319 KB)

    Presents the seven basic steps of opportunistic software process evolution. (1) Notice problems in products or outcomes. (2) Choose an important or chronic problem and look for a way to solve it, in whole or in part. (3) Conceive of a new, borrowed or modified process that could solve the problem at an acceptable cost and in an acceptable time frame. (4) Try the new process on a real project. (5) ... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Computer science and the Pygmalion effect

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):116 - 117
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (230 KB)

    Can computer science learn from the social sciences? We focus our discussions on an undesired phenomenon that commonly affects software developers. Known as the Pygmalion effect, this phenomenon has been studied intensely by social scientists but almost entirely ignored by computer scientists. Pygmalion was a sculptor who fell in love with his statue, Galatea, brought to life for him by Aphrodite.... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Perspectives in optical computing

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):22 - 25
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (112 KB)

    30 years ago, the author was certain that electronics was reaching its natural limits and that optics alone could offer massive parallelism. In this article, he explains how he had it all wrong and how-after enduring a time of fear and doubt-he developed new confidence about the future of optics. Optics is dead, he says, only if we foolishly believe that its role is to replace electronics. All-opt... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes peer-reviewed articles written for and by computer researchers and practitioners representing the full spectrum of computing and information technology, from hardware to software and from emerging research to new applications. 

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Sumi Helal
Lancaster University
sumi.helal@computer.org