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Professional Communication, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 4 • Date Dec. 1997

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Deborah C. Andrews, Ed., International Dimensions Of Technical Communication. Arlington, Va: Soc. Tech. Commun., 1996, 135 pp., No Index. [Book Review]

    Page(s): 305 - 307
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Randy Y. Hirokawa And Marshall Scott Poole, Eds., Communication And Group Decision Making Thousand Oaks, Ca: Sage Pub., 1996, 488 pp. [Book Review]

    Page(s): 308 - 309
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Brent Wilson, Ed., Constructivist Learning Environments: Case Studies In Instructional Design. Englewood Cliffs, Nj: Educational Technology Pub., 1996, 252 pp. With Index. [Book Review]

    Page(s): 310 - 312
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Designing & Delivering Scientific, Technical, And Managerial Presentations [Book Review]

    Page(s): 313 - 315
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • 1997 Index IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication Vol. 40

    Page(s): 1 - 5
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Digital architectures: a rhetoric of electronic document structures

    Page(s): 275 - 283
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (192 KB)  

    As multimedia communication continues to grow, online technologies have dramatically changed the ways we use and present information-so much so, that we need new theories and models for understanding how technology and content are related in the new communication environment. The paper presents a theory of digital architecture, explains how SGML, HTML, and information architectures are related in the creation of a new online literacy and rhetoric, and discusses concepts, skills, and resources needed for educating tomorrow's technical communicators View full abstract»

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  • Ethics and technical communication: a case for foundational approaches

    Page(s): 284 - 298
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    The study of ethics is important for technical communication students and professionals because as workers and as citizens they confront ethical dilemmas and must act. The article describes and contrasts several foundational and nonfoundational ethical approaches. Analyzing two well known ethics cases from the perspective of the different approaches, it is argued that although foundational approaches are limited, they provide better insights than do nonfoundational approaches. Finally, the article describes a problem solving technique, based on foundational approaches and communicative ethics, that can be used by technical communication students and professionals to analyze ethical dilemmas View full abstract»

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  • Discovering user-generated metaphors through usability testing

    Page(s): 255 - 264
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    A post hoc analysis of data collected from a usability test on the Fluke ScopeMeter 97 (a diagnostic instrument for analyzing electrical signals) revealed that, in doing tasks, subjects were making use of their own internal metaphors (user generated) that were unsupported by the design of the ScopeMeter keys. We investigated the interaction of the user generated metaphors and designer generated metaphors. By examining the effects that the subjects' skill levels and their backgrounds had on employing such metaphors, we began to outline certain characteristics of user generated metaphors. We found that user generated metaphors demonstrate unyielding persistence in the minds of ScopeMeter users, particularly in the higher skilled subjects View full abstract»

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  • Minimalism as a framework

    Page(s): 265 - 274
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    We identify various minimalist techniques and argue that, although these techniques can conflict with each other, together they provide a framework for designing computer documentation. A minimalist approach involves making tradeoffs within this framework rather than following a set of prescriptive techniques. Minimalism in this sense, is a pragmatic design philosophy aimed at the overall objective of “minimizing” obstacles to use. The framework covers the following design issues: word and page count, duplication, selective documentation of facilities, elaboration, task orientation, guided exploration, error recovery, and access View full abstract»

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  • Beginnings and endings: keys to better engineering technical writing

    Page(s): 299 - 304
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    Engineers face many technical writing tasks that have many features in common: title, abstract, introduction, problem formulation, methods, results, and conclusions. But it is often very difficult to actually write these segments in the same order they appear in the finished product. Instead of this linear approach, we recommend a modular approach starting with the core sections, the methods and results that researchers know best, and working backward and forward to pick up the beginnings and endings. We show how the beginning and ending sections build on the core sections and offer strategies to improve them View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication is a peer-reviewed journal devoted to applied research on professional communication--including but not limited to technical and business communication. It has been published since 1957 by the Professional Communication Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Saul Carliner
Concordia University