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IEEE Annals of the History of Computing

Issue 1 • Date Jan.-March 1998

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • A history of the IBM Systems Journal

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):29 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1500 KB)

    The IBM Systems Journal was founded in 1962 to inform IBM employees about new developments in computer systems. It evolved into a bridge between the science of computing and the practical use of computers. Besides IBM employees, readers now include IBM customers and others whose work involves computers, as well as students and faculty at colleges and universities. Authors, once exclusively from IB... View full abstract»

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  • Building IBM: Shaping An Industry And Its Technologies [Reviews]

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):81 - 82
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The timetable of computers: a chronology of the most important people and events in the history of computers [Review]

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):82 - 83
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The Superman, The Story Of Seymour Cray And The Technical Wizards Behind The Supercomputer [Review]

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):83 - 84
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Selected Papers On Computer Science

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):82 - 83
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (286 KB)

    First Page of the Article
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  • Obituary [Mina S. Rees]

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):65 - 66
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Blaise Pascal's adding machine: new findings and conclusions

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):69 - 76
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1064 KB)

    Ever since its invention and initial description in 1652, Blaise Pascal's adding machine has been the subject of numerous studies and publications (D. Diderot and J.L. d'Alembert, 1751). However, when compiling and systematically analyzing the literature, a rather diffuse image emerges. For one thing, the method of subtraction is not accurately described. The article attempts to find out how one c... View full abstract»

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  • The Calcumeter

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):67 - 69
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3240 KB)

    The Calcumeter adder appeared shortly after 1900, prospered for a while, and then apparently stopped production by 1920. Before its demise, as many as 100000 adders may have been made. The Calcumeter is an interesting, well made, small adding machine that is sought by collectors. The two names that are associated with it are James J. Walsh and Herbert North Morse: Walsh was the inventor and Morse ... View full abstract»

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  • Mark IV: evolution of the software product, a memoir

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):43 - 50
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (844 KB)

    The article describes the story of the evolution of an early commercial software product, Mark IV, from preconception through its early trials and tribulations to its realization. The goal was not always clear, the path was not always direct, but we got there. In 1965, the Mark IV file management system was conceived as a non application oriented software product, the first true such software in t... View full abstract»

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  • IBM Research Laboratory Zurich: the early years

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):15 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (7736 KB)

    IBM hired the author in 1955 as the director of its newly established Zurich research laboratory in Switzerland, which at that time had no staff, no offices, and no laboratories. The author hired staff, leased offices, and later directed the construction of IBM's permanent research building in Switzerland. He left IBM in 1966, having personally recruited or approved of recruiting about 100 employe... View full abstract»

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  • A view from the 1960s: how the software industry began

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):36 - 42
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (232 KB)

    The conventional wisdom in the computer industry in the 1960s was that one could not make any money selling software-it was either given away free by the computer manufacturers or written specifically and uniquely for each computer installation. But several years before the concept of charging for software products was given legitimacy by IBM's unbundling in June 1969, there were a number of entre... View full abstract»

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  • The Institute of Precision Mechanics and Computer Technology and the El'brus family of high-speed computers

    Publication Year: 1998, Page(s):4 - 14
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4292 KB)

    The Institute of Precision Mechanics and Computer Technology was the dominant developer of high speed systems in the Soviet Union from 1950 through to the end of the cold war. One of its principal lines of development was the El'brus family of multiprocessors. The El'brus-1 and El'brus-2 show the strong influence of design ideas implemented in the Burroughs 700 family but exhibit a variety of inno... View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Annals of the History of Computing serves as a record of vital contributions which recount, preserve, and analyze the history of computing and the impact of computing on society.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Nathan Ensmenger
Indiana University, School of Informatics & Computing
nensmeng@indiana.edu