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Concurrency, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date Oct.-Dec. 1997

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • The Engineering of Complex Distributed Computer Systems

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 30 - 31
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (73 KB)  

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  • Two books on distributed computing [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 80 - 82
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • HIPPI over ATM networks: extending connections for distributed computing

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 40 - 53
    Cited by:  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (280 KB)  

    HIPPI networks, which are popular as connections among supercomputers and high-end workstations, have not yet become widespread in distributed computing because of their distance limitations. This article compares two schemes that overcome this restriction and provide high bandwidth utilization: HIPPI tunneling and IP routing View full abstract»

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  • Application-centric parallel multimedia software

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 78 - 79, 82
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    Parallel and distributed high-performance computing will be generally available both implicitly and explicitly for digital multimedia applications. This is not a conjecture; it's a reflection of current activity in engineering systems for visual- and data-intensive multimedia applications. As a result, parallel high-performance computing must mature very quickly and come into the mainstream of software development. For this to happen, research in areas of parallel computing software such as languages, system designs, compilers, and tools construction must break out of the mold and reestablish the objective of high-performance parallel computing for the masses. The focus needs to be on what parallel computing can do for the applications instead of what the applications can do with parallel computing. The latter principle has governed most parallel computing efforts to date. Digital multimedia computing is expected to achieve consumer status very rapidly. This dictates that the development of high-performance parallel computing multimedia applications must be as easy and integrated to everyday computing environments as is the development of Java applets. In other words, one needs a user-oriented and application-centric view of parallel computing software, instead of the system-oriented and number-centric focus that has dominated past and current development View full abstract»

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  • Trace Factory: generating workloads for trace-driven simulation of shared-bus multiprocessors

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 54 - 68
    Cited by:  Papers (6)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (236 KB)  

    A major concern with high-performance general-purpose workstations is to speed up the execution of commands, uniprocess applications, and multiprocess applications with coarse- to medium-grain parallelism. The authors have developed a methodology and a set of tools to generate traces for the performance evaluation of shared-bus, shared-memory multiprocessor systems. Trace Factory produces traces representing significant real workloads consisting of a flexible set of commands and uniprocess and multiprocess user applications. The authors evaluate its accuracy and show how it can be used to evaluate and compare the performance of five coherence protocols View full abstract»

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  • Garf: a tool for programming reliable distributed applications

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 32 - 39
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
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    The authors discuss Garf object-oriented tool that supports the design and programming of reliable distributed applications. Garf lets developers program an application and then replicate its critical components over several machines. Using a built-in library of distributed abstractions, developers can choose a replication strategy for each component of the application View full abstract»

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  • Cyber-bricks and paradigms

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 11 - 12, 17
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    The author considers how the idea of clustering has become new again. Clusters of NT computers and mass storage devices, connected locally and remotely into a single, highly scalable system, will quickly become the dominant model of enterprise computing. Over 80% of the multiserver systems today are connected for high availability. The demands of accessibility and reliability in today's Internet, intranet, and enterprise server environments increasingly require failover capability, if one server goes down, the other takes over automatically View full abstract»

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  • Europort-D: parallel computing for European industry

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 7 - 10
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    The paper discusses the highly successful European Esprit initiative Europort. The initiative migrated 35 industrial codes to parallel platforms in a portable way, covering almost the whole spectrum of industrial applications for which HPC is essential. Where costly high-computing power was the main bottleneck for numerical simulation, the availability of parallel software now allows a substantial step forward. The paper considers the follow up project Europort-D, managed by the Institute for Algorithms and Scientific Computing (SCAI) of the German National Research Center of Information Technology (GMD). For ten different application areas, new end users have demonstrated the business benefits parallel-computing technology can provide for their industry View full abstract»

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  • Is an alligator better than an armadillo? [interconnection networks]

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 18, 20 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1836 KB)  

    Multiprocessor interconnection network effectiveness differs considerably across applications and operating environments, but even if these variables were fixed, cost and performance metrics must be chosen. Scientifically determining the best network is as difficult as saying with certainty that one animal is better than another. We explore the problems of determining which metrics or weighted set of metrics designers should use to compare networks and how they should apply these metrics to yield meaningful information. We also look at problems in conducting fair and scientific evaluations View full abstract»

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  • Rethinking integrity [distributed databases]

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 5 - 6
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    In practice, no real database enjoys complete integrity, a variety of factors conspire to make some information stale, missing, or just plain wrong. System design and analysis should recognize that real systems lack integrity to some degree, most, if not all, of the time. Significant benefits flow from such recognition. Risk management techniques can identify the severity of different integrity-loss scenarios, thereby focusing scarce resources on critical areas. A designer can deliberately sacrifice nonessential integrity under carefully controlled conditions to achieve other design objectives, such as performance, autonomy, availability, or security. Designers can achieve these objectives and still preserve essential aspects of integrity. The authors discuss the factors that undermine integrity in distributed databases View full abstract»

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  • Methods for observing global properties in distributed systems

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 69 - 77
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
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    The author surveys algorithms that focus on special classes of predicates to observe global properties in distributed systems. This abstraction is key to efficient debugging and fault tolerance. The algorithms are also flexible, allowing for optimizations to fit application needs. For example, algorithms to detect general predicates can be optimized by exploiting specific properties of the channel predicate. In checking if a channel is empty, it may be sufficient to deal with the number of messages only, rather than the message themselves View full abstract»

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  • Robots playing soccer? RoboCup poses a new set of challenges in intelligent distributed computing

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 13 - 17
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    The author discusses a new challenge looming on computing's horizon, the robot world soccer cup, RoboCup. It will stretch the boundaries of intelligent distributed computing as roboticists work toward world-class proficiency. RoboCup is intended to stimulate innovations in a wide range of technologies and the integration of technologies into a fully functional robotic soccer team. The author discusses the requirements of a world-class robot team, including individual agent skills, cooperative behavior and learning View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Periodical ceased production in 2000.

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