By Topic

Computer Applications in Power, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date July 1989

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
  • New control center for EPM in Medellin, Colombia (power system computer control)

    Page(s): 9 - 14
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1171 KB)  

    The municipal electric utility of Empresas Publicas de Medellin (EPM) in Medellin, Colombia, has completed the installation and testing of their new control center. These facilities, which include all the functions expected from a modern control center, were implemented through carefully monitored and executed project stages, which are described by the authors. They also describe the system layout, EPM's hydro resources, and the staffing and organization of the center.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Turbine-generator shaft oscillation monitoring with PCs

    Page(s): 15 - 18
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (545 KB)  

    The use of a PC-based system to record the speed of the shaft on five of Utah Power & Light's largest steam turbine-generator units is described. This quantity will be fed to special protective relays. The relays are designed to detect mechanical resonance with natural frequencies below 60 Hz, called subsynchronous resonance.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An interactive computer-graphics program to aid instruction in electric machinery

    Page(s): 19 - 25
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (825 KB)  

    A description is given of an interactive computer-graphics program that was developed in the School of Electrical Engineering at Cornell University (USA) as an adjunct to laboratory instruction in electric machinery. The program had three components, covering DC generator build-up, DC generator build-down, and DC generator compounding. Techniques and guidelines are presented in sufficient detail to permit creation of similar programs that can serve as aids to undergraduate electrical engineering education in power. Students who wish to apply their computer expertise in the power field will find that the construction of such a program is an excellent topic for a special or senior project.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Transmission line computer-aided design and drafting

    Page(s): 26 - 30
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (815 KB)  

    A power transmission line computer-aided design and drafting program is summarized. The program is a sophisticated, user-friendly software package developed for the IBM 286/386 desktop computers and compatibles. The package is designed to aid engineers, designers, and drafters in producing plans and profiles of overhead transmission lines. The interface approach is based on pull-down/pop-up menus, which allow the user to explore the capabilities of the program's command structure with little need to refer to the user's guide. Basic input consists of information regarding terrain, line costs, tower criteria, and line-design criteria. Output from the program's optimized or manually designed line can be viewed on the screen or sent to a printer, plotter, printer/plotter, or to a file. This includes both drawings and reports. A separate report for rerating or upgrading studies of an existing line is provided.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Analysis and solutions for bulk system voltage instability

    Page(s): 31 - 35
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (623 KB)  

    The phenomenon of voltage instability and its effects are described in some detail. It is argued that controls that can steer a system away from voltage instability are feasible and badly needed. Among the control possibilities discussed are: load tap changers between the bulk and distribution systems, which play a key role in the voltage collapse process, sometimes contributing to collapse, sometimes helping avoid it; the use of generator reactive overload capability (a few extra VArs from a generator can save a system from collapse or give operators time to restore a secure state); and undervoltage load shedding.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Rate impacts-a practical scoping model (electricity tariffs)

    Page(s): 36 - 39
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (450 KB)  

    A procedure is presented for evaluating the impact of various residential rate structures on electricity sales and load forecasts. The technique provides a method for easily evaluating the impact of alternative rate structures on the quantity of an electricity demand, while taking account of the entire block rate structure and associated elasticity impacts on forecast kilowatt-hour usage. The procedure accounts for any changes in customer charges, as well as in any or all block rates. Given sufficiently detailed energy forecasts, seasonal or monthly rate impacts can then be analyzed. The procedure is easily adapted to a forecasting framework and can be implemented by using a spreadsheet program such as Lotus 1-2-3 to facilitate timely evaluation of alternative rate scenarios.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Translation of large data bases for microcomputer-based application software: methodology and a case study

    Page(s): 40 - 45
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (493 KB)  

    The authors report on the recent application of a versatile database management system to the mainframe-resident transmission system planning program NUPLAN (Northeast Utilities Transmission Expansion Program), which has been updated and converted for microcomputer use. Included are the extensive uses of the dBASE III PLUS database management system for processing input data from large files and the development of a versatile, interactive format. The data-management program has been successfully used to process an actual power-flow database containing approximately 2500 buses and 4200 lines. A second application of database management, in a project concerned with the evaluation of the effects of pulsed loads resulting from high-energy particle physics experiments, is briefly described.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Dynamic thermal rating of critical lines-a study of real-time interface requirements

    Page(s): 46 - 51
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (581 KB)  

    Power system operators need the ability to assess network performance from a thermal capacity standpoint. However, static ratings do not provide the level of information needed and, in fact, can mislead operators. To address this problem, a study that resulted in the instrumentation of a 138000 V line with the necessary equipment to rate the line dynamically was initiated by Wisconsin Power and Light. The line chosen for the project was the X20 line, a 6 mile transmission line that runs from the Columbia Power Plant substation to the Portage substation. The discussion covers the conductor temperature measurement systems; the real-time interface: monitoring and handling of raw data; the rating process; the thermal transient conductor response; suppressed rating during the transient period; thermal transient response display; and alarm processing.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.