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Network, IEEE

Issue 5 • Date Sep/Oct 1997

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • TCP/IP performance over satellite links

    Page(s): 44 - 49
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1180 KB)  

    Achieving high data rates using TCP/IP over satellite networks can be difficult. This article explains some of the reasons TCP/IP has difficulty with satellite links. We present solutions to some problems, and describe the state of the research on some the unsolved problems View full abstract»

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  • On certificate-based security protocols for wireless mobile communication systems

    Page(s): 50 - 55
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1492 KB)  

    Mutual authentication and session key exchange protocols based on certificates for the wireless mobile communication/computing system are proposed. First, two improved versions for the conventional certificate-based systems are proposed, and an offline authentication mechanism based on the dynamic certificate is introduced. Then, an end-to-end internetwork-authenticated session key exchange protocol, which preserves a private communication between two mobile users, is finally proposed. In designing the security protocols proposed, the low computational power of the mobile stations and the low bandwidth of the wireless networks are considered View full abstract»

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  • Reducing the network cost of call delivery to GSM roamers

    Page(s): 19 - 25
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3292 KB)  

    When a GSM user travels to a foreign country, it is anticipated that a call delivery from a caller in that country to the GSM roamer should be a local phone call. Unfortunately, under the current GSM implementation, the call delivery results in two international calls! In this article we explain why current GSM implementation is expensive for this kind of call delivery, and then propose four solutions to reduce the two international calls into one local phone call. Our solutions may significantly reduce the nonnecessary usage of international circuits as well as customer costs View full abstract»

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  • An architecture for monitoring, visualization, and control of gigabit networks

    Page(s): 34 - 43
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2608 KB)  

    We outline a design of a highly scalable network monitoring, visualization, and control (NMVC) system with advanced algorithmic and human-in-the-loop capability. This capability allows network administrators to calibrate and fine-tune network and application parameters in real time according to observed traffic patterns. The goal of the NMVC system is to ensure adequate quality of service to network users, while maintaining high network resource utilization. The main components of our system are: a network probe and an endsystem probe which can probe gigabit/s links, software network management agents that provide extensible multi-attribute event filtering for highly scalable date/event collection, efficient online event ordering algorithms that can help synthesize and display a consistent view of network health, status, and performance and a View Choreographer that allows management applications and administrators to specify the mapping of network events to higher-level events and to visualization objects and updates View full abstract»

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  • ATM network resilience

    Page(s): 26 - 33
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    With the prospect of widespread deployment of ATM by public network operators, it is crucial to ensure resilience to network outages caused by cable breaks and node failures. The general aim of resilience is to make network failures transparent to users. If a failure happens to affect a circuit, it would be very desirable to reconfigure that circuit as quickly as possible with no information loss. However, if this functionality incurs a significant cost overhead, it may be necessary to charge customers according to the resilience they receive. Since user requirements vary from service to service, it is highly likely that different customers will demand variable levels of resilience. For example, mission-critical business-oriented data services will rely on virtually fault-transparent service, whereas residential customers may tolerate breaks in service as long as they do not occur frequently or last a long time. Fortunately, different ATM restoration mechanisms are possible which suit varied customer requirements. This article summarizes a range of research papers describing ATM restoration techniques. The viable options to provide ATM network resilience are discussed, along with the customer requirements which they satisfy and aspects of ATM resilience being assessed by standards bodies. Taking all such matters into consideration, conclusions are drawn on the current and future scope for ATM resilience View full abstract»

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  • Programming telecommunication networks

    Page(s): 8 - 18
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    The move toward market deregulation and open competition has sparked a wave of serious introspection in the telecommunications service industry. Telecom providers and operators are now required to open up their primary revenue channels to competing industries. The competition for product differentiation increasingly depends on the level of sophistication, degree of flexibility, and speed of deployment of services that a future provider can offer. These factors in turn depend heavily on the flexibility of the software architecture in place in a provider's operational infrastructure. Within this context, we examine the service architecture of two major global communication networks-the telephone network and the Internet and explore their weaknesses and strengths. We discuss the realization of an open programmable networking environment based on a new service architecture for advanced telecommunication services that overcomes the limitations of the existing networks. Our approach to network programmability stems from two angles-one conceptual, the other implementational. In the first, we attempt to develop a service model that is open and reflects the economic market structure of the future telecommunications service industry. Furthermore, we introduce an extended reference model for realizing the service marketplace and present it as a vehicle for creating multimedia services with QoS guarantees. In the second, we investigate the feasibility of engineering the reference model from an implementation standpoint. We describe a realization of the open programmable networking environment as a broadband kernel. Called xbind, the broadband kernel incorporates IP and CORBA technologies for signaling, management, and service creation, and ATM for transport. We also address some of the important QoS, performance, scalability, and implementation issues View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Network covers topics which include: network protocols and architecture; protocol design and validation; communications software; network control, signaling and management; network implementation (LAN, MAN, WAN); and micro-to-host communications.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Xuemin (Sherman) Shen, PhD
Engineering University of Waterloo