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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 9 • Date Sept. 1997

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Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
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  • Save the Dinosaurs of War

    Page(s): 43
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (134 KB)  

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  • Digital beam forming (DBF) antenna system for mobile communications

    Page(s): 31 - 41
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    We demonstrate the feasibility of a digital beam forming (DBF) and beam space CMA (Constant Modulus Algorithm) adaptive array antenna by implementing a digital signal processor (DSP) in ASICs using field programmable gate arrays (FPGA), this DBF can synthesize 16 multi-beams and eliminate interference signals by CMA adaptive processing. The whole function was implemented in 10 DSPs about 127,000 equivalent gates. Simple experimental results have confirmed the basic function of the DBF and BSCMA adaptive array antenna View full abstract»

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  • Evaluation of three ATE test environments

    Page(s): 12 - 17
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (608 KB)  

    It is often difficult to assess the positive and negative issues facing the use of a particular software test environment in a given application. Much of the literature is swayed by the use of each environment by a single application. This paper will provide detailed information on ARGO Systems evaluation of three popular ATE Test Environments: the Ada Based Environment for Testing (ABET), the TYX PAWS ATLAS test environment and the National Instruments LabVIEW graphical test environment. This evaluation was accomplished by comparing the same test program measurements in each environment using the same UUT, interface test adapter, and the same PC-based ATE. As such, the data represents a true apples-to-apples comparison of these environments View full abstract»

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  • Sensor fusion for intelligent alarm analysis

    Page(s): 18 - 24
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    The purpose of an intelligent alarm analysis system is to provide complete and manageable information to a central alarm station operator by applying alarm processing and fusion techniques to sensor information. This paper discusses the sensor fusion approach taken to perform intelligent alarm analysis for the Advanced Exterior Sensor (AES). The AES is an intrusion detection and assessment system designed for wide-area coverage, quick deployment, low false/nuisance alarm operation, and immediate visual assessment. It combines three sensor technologies (visible, infrared, and millimeter wave radar) collocated on a compact and portable remote sensor module. The remote sensor module rotates at a rate of 1 revolution per second to detect and track motion and provide assessment in a continuous 360° field-of-regard. Sensor fusion techniques are used to correlate and integrate the track data from these three sensors into a single track for operator observation. Additional inputs to the fusion process include environmental data, knowledge of sensor performance under certain weather conditions, sensor priority, and recent operator feedback. A confidence value is assigned to the track as a result of the fusion process. This helps to reduce nuisance alarms and to increase operator confidence in the system while reducing the workload of the operator View full abstract»

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  • Prismatic lithium-ion batteries

    Page(s): 7 - 11
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    Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries have demonstrated the ability to fulfill the energy storage needs of many new technologies. The most significant drawbacks of currently available technologies, such as LiCoO 2 based Li-ion cells, is their high cost and significant environmental hazards. Li-ion cells which use a lithium manganese oxide (LiMn2O4) spinel based cathode material should be much less costly and safer than LiCoO2 based cells. Performance data from prismatic design cells which use a LiMn2O4 based cathode material is presented and shown to meet many military performance criteria. The most significant drawback of this technology is the short cycle life View full abstract»

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  • Ecological limitation to the energy transfer from the outer space to Earth

    Page(s): 3 - 6
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    The energy production development on Earth is related with a number limitation. One of the reasonable ways is the thruster of the main production facilities into outer space. It is most rational to use the fusion reactors with D3He cycle from the economical and ecological consideration. There are two directions in the usage of the high power produced in outer space. The first direction is based on the electric energy transfer to Earth for its future utilisation. The second direction which has been developed by the authors for a number of years is the implementation of the energy produced in space at the large outer space-located industrial complexes. The energy producer and the energy consumer represent a single complex without deterioration of ecological conditions on Earth View full abstract»

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  • Methodology for cost-effective software fault tolerance for mission-critical systems

    Page(s): 25 - 30
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    A computing capabilities continue to advance, there will be a concurrent rise in the number of both hardware and software faults. These will be caused by the greater volume of more complex software, by the increased number of untested software states, and by more incidents of hardware/software interaction faults as a result of increased hardware speed and density. The traditional software implemented fault tolerance: approaches have been successfully utilized in life-critical systems, such as digital flight controls, where their additional costs can be easily justified. Examples include N-Version Programming and Recovery Block approaches. However, there is still a need for dependable computing for mission-critical applications as well. Often, these traditional techniques are avoided for mission-critical systems due to the difficulty in justifying their extra up-front development cost. We provide an alternative for the high “sunk cost” of traditional software fault tolerance techniques. The methodology, called data fusion integrity processes (DFIPs), is a simple, yet effective technique for mission-critical systems. In addition, the approach establishes a framework from which other costlier, more extensive traditional techniques can be added. We present details of the DFIP methodology and a DFIP framework for Ada programs. We also briefly discuss development of a DFIP code generation system which exploits Java that will enable users to quickly build a DFIP framework in Ada, and select reusable DFIP component methods View full abstract»

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The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

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Teresa Pace, PhD EE
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