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Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date July-Aug. 1997

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Displaying Results 1 - 14 of 14
  • From the Guest Editors- Biomedical Engineering in China

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 16
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Modeling and decomposition of HRV signals with wavelet transforms

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 17 - 22
    Cited by:  Papers (6)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1570 KB)  

    The authors use a wavelet transform to build a simulated model of an HRV signal and to create an algorithm for HRV signal decomposition. They review the characteristics of HRV signals and discuss an improved integral pulse frequency modulation model for the simulation of these signals. They also present results that show how their model approximates a real HRV signal. View full abstract»

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  • Compression of ECG data by vector quantization

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 23 - 26
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (741 KB)  

    The authors first estimate the ECG rate-distortion bound, which is the theoretical limit in the compression of the ECG data. They then present ECG data-compression schemes based on codebook quantizer and finite-state VQ (FSVQ), which are suitable for coding a correlative signal. Then, the authors' modified FSVQ-based scheme is presented. View full abstract»

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  • A new approach to medical image reconstruction

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 41 - 46
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    The authors propose a multiobjective optimization method using the weighted sum problem in order to deal with image reconstruction from projections. In their scheme, after determining the objective functions, a satisfactory solution of the decision maker can be derived by updating the weighted coefficients simultaneously with the tradeoff between the objective functions. Furthermore, the noninferiority of the generated solution in each iteration is guaranteed. As has been shown, the multiobjective optimization-based image reconstruction approach is superior to the least-squares and convolution methods. The authors can say that the multiobjective approach makes traditional image reconstruction from projections flexible and robust to uncertainty and multiplicity of reconstruction objectives. They are convinced that the proposed method and its extension will become an efficient tool for design of new CT scanners. View full abstract»

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  • Molecular electronics: strategies and progress in China

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 53 - 61
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    The field of molecular electronics is being used to explore a new generation of electronic devices and bionic information processing systems in China. Molecular research in China covers three different levels: (1) nanotechnology for molecular assembly in both fundamental and practical applications; (2) molecular devices for sensing, memory, switching, and actuation; (3) and theoretical studies on novel computing principles. In this article the authors review the main achievements in molecular electronics, but due to space limitations, it is impossible to cover all important results. View full abstract»

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  • Feature extraction in image analysis. A program for facilitating data reduction in medical image classification

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 62 - 73
    Cited by:  Papers (13)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3696 KB)  

    Images are important for many biomedical applications. Here, the authors focus on the feature-extraction part of the image analysis process. The following topics are dealt with: feature vectors and feature spaces; binary object features; histogram features; color features; spectral features; feature extraction using CVIPtools; analysis/preprocessing. View full abstract»

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  • Using nonlinear dynamic metric tools for characterizing brain structures

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 83 - 92
    Cited by:  Papers (12)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1403 KB)  

    The collective dynamic behavior of the neural mass of different brain structures can be assessed from electroencephalographic recordings with depth electrodes measurements at regular time intervals (EEG time series). In recent years, the cheery of nonlinear dynamics has developed methods for quantitative analysis of experimental time series. The aim of this article is to report a new attempt to characterize global brain dynamics through electrical activity using these nonlinear dynamical metric tools. In addition, the authors study the dependence of the metric magnitudes on brain structure. The methods employed in this work are independent of any modeling of brain activity. They rely solely on the analysis of data obtained from a single variable time series. The authors analyze the EEG signals from depth electrodes that intersect different brain anatomical structures in a patient with refractory epilepsy prone to surgical treatment. The electrical signal provided by this type of electrode guarantees a low noise signal. View full abstract»

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  • Thinking twice about "tissue engineering" [ethical issues]

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 102 - 104
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
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    There is no question that organ transplantation is difficult and expensive. Screening donors for transmissible disease and accurate matching of donor organs to recipients, so that there will be the best possible blood and tissue compatibility, as well as appropriate size, is extremely difficult. Fundamental problems remain: the supply is far exceeded by the demand, the costs of the procedures involved tend pragmatically to reduce access by less well-off and disenfranchised individuals and, as a result, nagging questions of social justice remain. It is fair to state that these considerations have played a strong role in the early development of the field now known as "tissue engineering." The author recommends taking a second look at the entire concept of tissue engineering. Before one goes too far down this path, it is worthwhile to think twice; to consider the implications and ask whether there are some things that should not be done simply because they appear to be possible. Topics considered include: autoreplants, alloreplants, xenografts, gene transplants and cloning. View full abstract»

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  • The case of the unwritten patent license

    Publication Year: 1997
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (177 KB)  

    What happens when one company actively induces another company to spend the money needed to develop and make a new product and then after the product becomes the industry standard, sues that company for patent infringement? Should a court enjoin the second company from making the product? That was the question before the court in the recent case of Wang Laboratories vs. Mitsubishi Electronics. The case goes back to 1983, the dawn of the personal computer age. One of Wang's scientists, James Clayton, invented what was to become the basic memory module, now known as a SIMM (single in-line memory module). The Wang case illustrates that patent licenses do not always have to be written. Sometimes, years after the fact, a court can find that a patent owner granted an implied license through its course of conduct. Although such a finding is the exception rather than the rule, purchasers and suppliers of products can avoid the uncertainty of such a court decision by clearly setting forth their positions regarding patents in writing at the beginning of their relationship. View full abstract»

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  • The modulation transfer function. A simplified procedure for computer-aided quality evaluation in mammography

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 93 - 101
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1540 KB)  

    Regardless of the indisputable benefits of the modulation transfer function (MTF) method to radiographic image quality evaluation, most radiologists simply do not have the means for utilizing it due to the experimental difficulties in its application to mammography practice. One of the most significant difficulties for radiological departments is having the necessary equipment to digitize slit radiographic images-a microdensitometer, for example-to be used in quality assurance programs. Therefore, the authors propose the application of the transfer function method for quality evaluation of mammography equipment using a different procedure. This procedure is based on the calculation of the MTF from a simulated line spread function derived from the focal-spot projection. Since this technique does not need digitized images and can be performed on a PC, it will allow the use of the transfer function method in quality control programs without the constraints associated with the complexity of classical experimental procedures View full abstract»

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  • 3-D imaging and stereotactic radiosurgery

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 47 - 52
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2324 KB)  

    Three-dimensional image processing and analysis applications in stereotactic radiosurgery are discussed. Only simple and rapid methods of 3-D image analysis have been used. However, volumetric image techniques, such as volume rendering and fusion, would give more useful information in treatment planning. The topics dealt with include: treatment space specification; segmentation of structures of interest; model/knowledge-based approach; tumor targeting; beam's eye viewing; dose-volume fusion; isocentric parameter optimization View full abstract»

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  • Detecting myocardial ischemia with 2-D spectrum analysis of VCG signals

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 33 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (972 KB)  

    Based on the AFFT algorithm, the 2-D spectrum of the VCG signal method was applied in analyzing ECG signals for different extents of myocardial ischemia. Figures and parameters of the 2-D spectrum clearly reflect the vector-changing characteristics of the VCG signals in the 2-D plane and also in the frequency domain. This method remedies defects of the DFT spectrum, which cannot describe vector characteristics of the VCG signal on the 2-D plane. Through analysis of animal experiments, the authors find that the AFFT method is sensitive to change in myocardial blood flow. This method shows promise in the application of detecting early myocardial ischemia and measuring its extent. As a result, it is hoped that this method will significantly reduce patient mortality and morbidity View full abstract»

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  • Acoustic analysis of pathological voices. A voice analysis system for the screening of laryngeal diseases

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 74 - 82
    Cited by:  Papers (36)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2572 KB)  

    The authors propose a software system for pathological voice analysis and screening of laryngeal diseases that has the following properties: a) The analysis is totally noninvasive-the microphone is about 30 cm from the patient's mouth, and contact microphones or laryngophones are not used. b) The system is built around a low-cost personal computer (PC). The additional hardware consists of a standard sound card such as “Sound Blaster” (Creative Technology Inc., Paris, France). The card also includes a microphone. Any other analog-to-digital converter board allowing a sampling rate higher than 16 kHz, with 16 bit resolution (Sound Blaster and OROS have been already tested), and a linear phase condenser or electret microphone can be used to minimize the distortions during capture of the signal. c) The software is graphics-driven and user-friendly, therefore no special training is needed in using the system. d) The system is electrically safe since there is no electrical link between patient and PC View full abstract»

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  • Extraction of 40 Hz EEG bursts for chaos analysis of brain function

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 27 - 32
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (992 KB)  

    The authors describe the extraction of 40 Hz burst EEG activity in the face of electromyogram (EMG) noise. Extraction is done using time- and frequency-domain analysis, with a neural network to automate the task. The data are then analyzed using chaos theory to show how the 40 Hz activity can be used to recognize differences in cognitive states View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine contains articles on current technologies and methods used in biomedical and clinical engineering.

 

This Magazine ceased publication in 2010. The current retitled publication is IEEE Pulse.

Full Aims & Scope