By Topic

Software, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date July-Aug. 1997

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • Telling Good Numbers From Bad Ones

    Page(s): 15 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (131 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Foolishness Of Fashion

    Page(s): 18
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (63 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Creating Effective User Interfaces

    Page(s): 21 - 24
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (122 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Who ya gonna call! You're on your own (Point) [on software usability design]

    Page(s): 26 - 28
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (77 KB)  

    The issue here is not whether discount techniques should be used; they are inevitable. The issue is, in trying to do the best job you can with the ridiculously limited resources provided you, what should you do? How confident should you be in the techniques you are using? A bad design may come back and bite you. When you choose a technique to use in a hurry, you are placing your professional reputation and perhaps your job on the line. You deserve to know four things about any technique that you apply. The hit rate: How many real problems will this technique uncover? The false-alarm rate: How many (and what sorts) of things will it falsely identify as problems (that may not exist, but are costly and time consuming to "fix")? What does it miss? What types of problems (and how many) does this technique not discover? The correct rejections: How confident are you in your discount technique's ability to flag problems? Discount techniques are not a substitute for the potent combination of analytic and empirical methodologies that usability professionals can bring to bear in designing and evaluating an interface. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Something Is Better Than Nothing

    Page(s): 27 - 28
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (77 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Can clean pipes produce dirty water

    Page(s): 93 - 95
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (112 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Learning From The Real World

    Page(s): 98 - 99
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (69 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Web interests tangle over DNS proposal

    Page(s): 100 - 105
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (177 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Year 2000 Tool Classification Scheme

    Page(s): 107 - 111
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (100 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Programmer Writing

    Page(s): 120 - 119
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (73 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • How user perceptions influence software use

    Page(s): 58 - 65
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (152 KB)  

    Traditionally, human-computer interaction researchers have focused on a system's usability. The authors applied an MIS-proven technology acceptance model that accounts for system usefulness as well. They discovered that this factor has a strong bearing on user acceptance View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Predicting how badly “good” software can behave

    Page(s): 73 - 83
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (184 KB)  

    Using fault injection and failure-tolerance measurement with ultrarare inputs, the authors create on automated software environment that can supplement traditional testing methods. Applied to four case studies, their methods promise to make software more robust View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Choosing a user interface development tool

    Page(s): 29 - 39
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (868 KB)  

    Software developers face many difficult decisions when building new applications, not the least of which is the design of the graphical user interface. The answer to one question-is it better to use a GUI development tool or build it manually?-is relatively straightforward. Today's tools offer several benefits that manual coding does not. Because these tools often provide a simple graphical interface for developing displays, nonprogrammers and human factors engineers can contribute their expertise. Also, if the schedule permits, a tool can be used to build prototypes throughout the development cycle; some tools even provide a test/prototype mode for testing displays without compiling and executing the entire application. And finally, end users can evaluate each prototype and provide feedback, increasing their satisfaction with the final product View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A generic model for software architectures

    Page(s): 84 - 92
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (172 KB)  

    In other industries, the idea of build corporate culture by establishing a common level of “best practice” is widely known and used. The architecture concept directly supports this goal for our industry and can help us improve problem areas dominated by organizational and social issues, such as health care organizations, educational systems, and so on. Our proposed reference model for architecture specification and development is organized around a set of aspects that structure concepts and rules; these, in turn, specify a conceptual architecture. We have added principles and guidelines to the concepts and rules to give a more complete picture of the architecture and to provide a place to store and communicate successfully applied design patterns and other knowledge related to the architecture. Adding architectural elements is a step toward a more constructive type of architecture representation. Our current research is focused on further refining these concepts and developing a formal specification of the architecture reference model. We are continuing to test our ideas in case studies, such as applying our model to the OSCA architecture and the application machine concept. We are also developing a prototype architecture editor, and we are testing different tools to learn more about integrating them into a real infrastructure and to learn what typical services an infrastructure must provide View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Developing software using OVID

    Page(s): 51 - 57
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (160 KB)  

    Object View Interaction Design is a structured design methodology that helps the design team create a good, object-based user interface design. Because OVID uses a structured process and appropriate tools, the design progresses more quickly with fewer cycles of iteration View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Low-effort, high-payoff user interface reengineering

    Page(s): 66 - 72
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (120 KB)  

    Although increasingly sophisticated design methodologies for developing new user interfaces exist, low-effort, high-payoff user interface reengineering represents a new direction-and opportunity. Yet reengineering a working system is complex and risky because of the potential disruption to users and managers, their justifiable fear of change, and the lack of guarantees that such changes will be for the better. Our largely positive experiences with the projects described here lead us to believe that user interface reengineering is a viable and important process. Low effort, high-payoff improvement recommendations can probably be made for most existing systems. Nevertheless, a narrowly focused user interface reengineering plan may be inappropriate when the major problems lie outside the scope of the user interface, such as inadequate functionalities, frequent crashes, and network problems. Attempts at improving less severe problems while ignoring deeper ones may be perceived as insensitive by the users. In such cases it is important to consider either making similar short-term improvements for other parts of the systems or postponing short-term user interface reengineering in favour of a more complete system reengineering. Similarly, the need for interface stability might outweigh the benefits of the short-term improvements if a complete reengineering is planned for the near future. But most likely these proposed diagnostic strategies and opportunities for improvement are only a prelude to the much larger task of business reengineering, which implies extensive user interface reengineering View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A model-based interface development environment

    Page(s): 40 - 47
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (256 KB)  

    The author describes Mobi-D (Model-Based Interface Designer), a comprehensive environment that supports user-centered design through model-based interface development. In the Mobi-D paradigm, a series of declarative models, such as user-task, dialog, and presentation, are interrelated to provide a formal representation of an interface design. This contrasts to model-based systems, which use only one or two models in isolation and have no explicit notion as to how the various model elements are organized into an interface design View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

IEEE Software's mission is to build the community of leading and future software practitioners. The magazine delivers reliable, useful, leading-edge software development information to keep engineers and managers abreast of rapid technology change

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Forrest Shull
Fraunhofer Center for Experimental Software Engineering