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Information Technology in Biomedicine, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date March 1997

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Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
  • Biomedical information technology: medicine and health care in the digital future

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 1 - 7
    Cited by:  Papers (17)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (49 KB)  

    Advancements in medicine and health care are being significantly influenced by the exploding information technology developments. The IEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine will address the applications and the infrastructure innovations that would harness biomedical and health care programs in the 21st century. View full abstract»

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  • What Can You Publish In T-ITB?

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 17 - 18
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Programmable ultrasound imaging using multimedia technologies: a next-generation ultrasound machine

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 19 - 29
    Cited by:  Papers (16)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (210 KB)  

    High computational and throughput requirements in modern ultrasound machines have restricted their internal design to algorithm-specific hardware with limited programmability. The authors have architected a programmable ultrasound processing system, Programmable Ultrasound Image Processor (PUIP), to facilitate engineering and clinical ultrasound innovations. Multiple high-performance multimedia processors were used to provide a computing power of 4 billion operations per second. Flexibility was achieved by making the system programmable and multimodal, e.g., B-mode, color flow, cine and Doppler data can be processed. They have successfully designed and implemented the PUIP to fit within an ultrasound machine. It provides a platform for rapid testing of new concepts in ultrasound processing and enables software upgrades for future technologies. Current and future clinical applications include extended fields of view, quantitative measurements, three-dimensional ultrasound reconstruction and visualization, adaptive persistence, speckle reduction, edge enhancement, image segmentation, and motion analysis. The PUIP is a significant step in the evolution of ultrasound machines toward more flexible and generalized systems bridging the gap between many innovative ideas and their clinical use in ultrasound machines. View full abstract»

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  • A direct multi-volume rendering method aiming at comparisons of 3-D images and models

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 30 - 43
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (391 KB)  

    The authors present a new method for direct volume rendering of multiple three-dimensional (3-D) functions using a density emitter model. The work is aimed at obtaining visual assessment of the results of a 3-D image registration algorithm which operates on anisotropic and non-segmented medical data. They first discuss the fundamentals associated with direct, simultaneous rendering of such datasets. Then, they recall the fuzzy classification and fuzzy surface rendering theory within the density emitter model terminology, and propose an extension of standard direct volume rendering that can handle the rendering of two or more 3-D functions; this consists of the definition of merging rules that are applied on emitter clouds. The included rendering applications are related on one hand, to volume-to-volume registration, and on the other hand, to surface-to-volume registration: the first case is concerned with global elastic registration of CT data, and the second one presents fitting of an implicit surface over a CT data subset. In these two medical imaging application cases, the rendering scheme offers a comprehensive appreciation of the relative position of structural information. View full abstract»

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  • A nurse rostering system using constraint programming and redundant modeling

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 44 - 54
    Cited by:  Papers (20)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (196 KB)  

    The paper describes the design and implementation of a constraint-based nurse rostering system using a redundant modeling approach. Nurse rostering is defined as the process of generating timetables for specifying the work shifts of nurses over a given period of time. This process is difficult because the human roster planner has to ensure that every rostering decision made complies with a mixture of hard hospital rules and soft nurse preference rules. Moreover, some nurse shift pre-assignments often break the regularity of wanted (or unwanted) shifts and reduce the choices for other unfilled slots. Soft constraints amount to disjunction, which can be modeled as choices in the search space. This approach, although straightforward, incurs overhead in the search of solution. To reduce search time, the authors propose redundant modeling, an effective way to increase constraint propagation through cooperation among different models for the same problem. The problem domain involves around 25 to 28 nurses and 11 shift types. Experiments and pilot testing of the system confirm the effectiveness and efficiency of the method. View full abstract»

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  • Compression guidelines for diagnostic telepathology

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 55 - 60
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (128 KB)  

    As the healthcare community has begun to rely increasingly upon digital technologies for acquisition, storage, and transmission of pictorial data, image compression has become an indispensable tool. The authors have investigated the feasibility of lossy compression in a well-defined task domain, the clinical assessment of digitized images of chromatic microscopic pathology specimens. The effect of compression was measured under two distinct perceptual criteria, just noticeable difference (JND) and largest tolerable distortion (LTD), differing in the involvement required from subjects, who were experts in pathology. For standard JPEG compressed images it was found that when the experiment is performed under the LTD criterion, a significantly larger compression ratio is reported as satisfactory. It is concluded that lossy compression holds promise for diagnostic telepathology. View full abstract»

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  • Virtual reality in medicine-computer graphics and interaction techniques

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 61 - 72
    Cited by:  Papers (12)  |  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (656 KB)  

    The paper describes several new visualization and interaction techniques that enable the use of virtual environments for routine medical purposes. A new volume-rendering method supports shaded and transparent visualization of medical image sequences in real-time with an interactive threshold definition. Based on these rendering algorithms two complementary segmentation approaches offer an intuitive assistance for a wide range of requirements in diagnosis and therapy planning. In addition, a hierarchical data representation for geometric surface descriptions guarantees an optimal use of available hardware resources and prevents inaccurate visualization. The combination of the presented techniques empowers the improved human-machine interface of virtual reality to support every interactive task in medical three-dimensional (3-D) image processing, from visualization of unsegmented data volumes up to the simulation of surgical procedures. View full abstract»

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  • An architecture for Naval telemedicine

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 73 - 79
    Cited by:  Papers (6)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (125 KB)  

    Navy fleets have a defined overall objective for mission readiness impacted by the health of personnel aboard the ships. Medical treatment facilities on the ships determines the degree of mission readiness. The paper describes the concepts and technologies necessary to establish a Naval telemedicine system, which can drastically improve health care delivery. It consists of various combinations of the following components: Fleet Naval Medical Consultation and Diagnostic Centers, Shipboard Naval Medical Consultation and Diagnostic Centers (hospital ship or combatant ships with medical specialists on board), and Remote Medical Referring Centers such as a ship, a small Naval station annex, or a field hospital. This Naval telemedicine architecture delivers clinical medicine and continuing medical education (CME) by means of computers, video-conferencing systems, or telephony to enhance the quality of care through improved access to research, medical and nonmedical imaging, remote consultations, patient clinical data, and multimedia medical education programs. It integrates the informatics infrastructure and provides a medical telepresence among participants. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine publishes basic and applied papers of information technology applications in health, healthcare and biomedicine.

 

This Transaction ceased publication in 2012. The current retitled publication is IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Yuan-ting Zhang
427, Ho Sin Hang Engineering Building, The Chinese
University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong
ytzhang@ee.cuhk.edu.hk
Phone:+852 2609-8458
Fax:+852 2609-5558