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Software Engineering. IEE Proceedings

Issue 2 • Date Apr 1997

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
  • Views of software quality: a field report

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 111 - 118
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (892 KB)  

    The authors present findings from a recent study into the quality views of software practitioners in five UK companies. The study explored how issues of software quality have affected grassroots practitioners in companies; in particular the typical experiences of practitioners and what practitioners really think about quality initiatives. It is only by listening to the experiences and views of ordinary practitioners that truly effective approaches to quality can be developed. Indeed various ways are recommended in which the results presented can be used to improve the effectiveness of quality initiatives. One of the main findings is that managers and developers are keen to see software quality improved, and are positive about ways in which that can be achieved. Developers are more enthusiastic than is usually believed to see quality formalism in software development. Developers in almost all of the companies in the study said they wanted a more formal approach to quality; developers in the companies with the least quality formalism were most keen to see it implemented. Although there has been significant progress in the field of software quality, it is shown that this has not yet filtered through to ordinary companies. Where it has, there is evidence of an overzealousness and dogma that have turned practitioners off quality altogether. The result is that many practitioners are frustrated about poor quality but feel they lack the power and information to do anything about it. Indeed, many practitioners believe that the market wants cheap software quickly and is not too concerned about its quality View full abstract»

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  • Usability requirements as specification constraints: an example of WYSIWYG

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 101 - 110
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1088 KB)  

    The paper describes the application of formal modelling techniques within interface design to a `what you see is what you get' style word processor to illustrate the analysis of the usability properties of interactive systems. A formal framework as an abstract model interaction is employed, termed the template model, which explicitly identifies system abstractions (known as templates) that have a defined relationship to the intended task and users' capabilities. In the investigation, a subset of a conventional word processor is formally specified. The specification is then analysed in terms of the template model by identifying abstractions upon which common word-processing tasks depend. The outcome of the analysis illustrates the potential benefit of the template model in explaining implicit assumptions about the usability properties of the artefact View full abstract»

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  • CCS specification of a Linda behavioural model debugger

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 89 - 100
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1224 KB)  

    The paper reports on an investigation into a behavioural model debugger for the Linda parallel programming paradigm using Milner's (1989) CCS. The Linda paradigm and the behavioural model for debugging are introduced, and an application of the model to Linda is discussed. A CCS specification of a Linda system with behavioural model debugger is presented and compared with a CCS specification of the basic Linda system. Observational equivalence is demonstrated between the two systems that ensures that, despite their internal differences, they are indistinguishable on the basis of their interactions with Linda client programs. A prototype Linda system with debugger that is based on the behavioural model approach is also described View full abstract»

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  • Coordinated backward recovery between client processes and data servers

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 134 - 146
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1384 KB)  

    The authors discuss backward error recovery for complex software systems, where different subsystems may belong to essentially different application areas. Such heterogeneous subsystems are naturally built according to different design `models', namely the `object-action' model (where the long-term state of the computation is encapsulated in data objects, and active processes invoke operations on these objects), and the `process-conversation' model (where the state is contained in the processes, communicating via messages). To allow backward error recovery in these two `models' of computation, two different schemes are most appropriate: atomic transactions for the object-action model, and conversations for the process-conversation model. Assuming that each of these two kinds of subsystem already has functioning mechanisms for backward error recovery, the authors describe the additional provisions needed for co-ordination between these heterogeneous subsystems. The solution involves altering the virtual machine on which the programs run, and programming conventions which seem rather natural and can be automatically enforced. The approach is demonstrated by a simple example View full abstract»

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  • Formal methods into practice: case studies in the application of the B method

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 119 - 133
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1756 KB)  

    The paper reports on an investigation into the application of the B method of formal software development. Six case studies are described, each exploring a different aspect of the use of the B methodology and toolkit. The case studies are drawn from a diverse range of applications and address different aspects of the software development lifecycle. The notation, method and tool support are assessed and conclusions are drawn concerning the use of B and formal methods generally View full abstract»

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