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Internet Computing, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date May-June 1997

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Displaying Results 1 - 13 of 13
  • The next computer revolution

    Page(s): 4 - 5
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  • Free on the range

    Page(s): 8 - 20
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  • The collaborating spider

    Page(s): 56 - 57
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  • E-mail attachments: finding the right fit

    Page(s): 78 - 79
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  • The next Japanese miracle

    Page(s): 83 - 84
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  • Using Java applets and CORBA for multi-user distributed applications

    Page(s): 43 - 55
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    The Java language environment, World Wide Web, and Common Object Request Broker Architecture are complementary software technologies, which when used together provide a powerful set of tools for developing and deploying multi-user distributed applications. We describe an approach to building reasonably sophisticated and easy-to-use client software as WWW-downloadable Java applets, which use CORBA to interact effectively with remote server software and thus coordinate and control access to a set of shared resources. We used this approach to reimplement a portion of an existing multi-user distributed application that had been built using the WWW Common Gateway Interface (CGI), then evaluated the differences between the two approaches. We found our method of combining Java applets and CORBA not only practical but in many ways superior to the widely used CGI approach, as well as to a conventional CORBA approach that does not exploit the WWW View full abstract»

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  • MMM: a Web-based system for sharing statistical computing modules

    Page(s): 59 - 68
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    This prototype method management system (MMM), implemented with Web technologies, supports distributed authoring and execution of computational software modules among an interdisciplinary group of developers and users. Heterogeneous data formats, programming languages, and computing platforms pose various challenges whenever researchers are sharing and combining software modules, especially when the collaboration occurs across different traditions of scientific computing. To meet these challenges, we designed and implemented MMM. MMM is a collection of middleware services to support the interaction between software users and developers, and to facilitate the sharing of software modules across heterogeneous networks. The system design follows the World Wide Web paradigm: developers (providers) install their modules on the network in a way that allows users (consumers) to access and execute them. A prototype is available on the Web View full abstract»

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  • Java: more than a revolution

    Page(s): 70 - 72
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    It started with a rumor-a rumor that something new and amazing was coming. In December 1995, when I was finally introduced to Java, I found something beyond the rumors and promises. Java was and still is a major revolution for the Web, for the developer world, and for the entire Internet community View full abstract»

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  • Reengineering the Hubble space telescope control center system

    Page(s): 28 - 35
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    The Hubble Space Telescope was funded in the late 1970s, when mainframes still ruled the world. By the time the Hubble was launched in 1990, desktop computers were ubiquitous, powerful, and about to be hyperlinked through the Internet. Hubble's operations control center at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center reflects these profound changes in computing technology. It has dozens of computing platforms and a control system that evolved over the course of 15 years of project development and subsequent operations. Efforts to reengineer these operational systems are now under way in a project called Vision 2000. The engineers at Goddard are implementing a three-tiered system architecture to integrate the heterogeneous computing environments that have evolved over the years. The new system uses a Web-based graphical user interface, written in Java, to enable greater access to engineering data than has ever before been possible. This GUI represents a Java implementation that is both large-scale (1.5 million lines of code) and mission-critical View full abstract»

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  • Mobile agents

    Page(s): 80 - 82
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    A lot of agents are executing on the Web, and some of them are starting to move around. While most agents are static (existing as a single process or thread on one host), others can pick up and move their code and data to a new host where they resume executing View full abstract»

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  • Collaborative intelligence. The Internet Chess Club on game 2 of Kasparov vs. Deep Blue

    Page(s): 38 - 42
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    The Internet was an important witness to a change in human-computer relations this spring, when IBM's Deep Blue computer defeated World Champion Garry Kasparov in a six-game chess match, 3.5 to 2.5. The author initiated an analysis by the Internet Chess Club that revealed a resource for Kasparov in the second game that could have prevented his defeat. The author dicusses the incident and the implications for collaboration on the Web View full abstract»

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  • Applications on the global computer

    Page(s): 74 - 77
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    The ultimate application of computing has been and will continue to be artificial intelligence. I am not debating the question whether computers will ever be intelligent: I am just stating that AI is always the direction of their evolution View full abstract»

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  • Distributed Java applets for project management on the Web

    Page(s): 21 - 26
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    The rapid evolution of our data communications infrastructure is making distributed projects increasingly viable. Without a common infrastructure, computer-supported collaborative tools for distributed teams have been prohibitively expensive to build and maintain. However, the increasing availability of the Internet is enabling companies to develop cost-effective collaborative solutions. Traditional desktop project management software is designed as a single-user tool that lets the project manager track tasks, milestones and deliverables. As teams spread over geographic distances with multiple centers of control, the communication, coordination, and tracking of ongoing project activity become key issues for project success. This article looks beyond the traditional planning focus of project management applications to a network-centric focus on collaboration. It describes the implementation of ActionPlan, a 100 percent Java-based application from Netmosphere that supports real-time collaboration among Java thin clients to facilitate distributed project management View full abstract»

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IEEE Internet Computing provides journal-quality evaluation and review of emerging and maturing Internet technologies and applications.

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Editor-in-Chief
Michael Rabinovich
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Case Western Reserve University