IEEE Annals of the History of Computing

Issue 2 • April-June 1997

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Anecdotes

    Publication Year: 1997, Page(s):62 - 69
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Obituary (of Robert B. Forest) [Biographies]

    Publication Year: 1997, Page(s):70 - 73
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  • Reviews

    Publication Year: 1997, Page(s):80 - 83
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Locating the victims: the nonrole of punched card technology and census work

    Publication Year: 1997, Page(s):31 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3280 KB)

    Provides information regarding the development of punched card technology for use in both census and commercial applications. After describing the different types of technology and how they were used, this article provides a detailed description of census requirements-and, in particular, the German censuses of 1925, 1933 and 1939-in an effort to counter arguments that German authorities used the r... View full abstract»

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  • Before the ENIAC [weapons firing table calculations]

    Publication Year: 1997, Page(s):25 - 30
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (220 KB)

    During World War II, the Ballistic Research Laboratory of the US Army was charged with the responsibility of preparing firing tables for the various new weapons under development. The computations required for the preparation of these firing tables were so time-consuming that they overwhelmed the facilities available at the laboratory. In spite of the extensive arrangements the laboratory made wit... View full abstract»

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  • Konrad Zuse's Plankalkül: the first high-level, “non von Neumann” programming language

    Publication Year: 1997, Page(s):17 - 24
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (464 KB)

    Konrad Zuse was the first person in history to build a working digital computer, a fact that is still not generally acknowledged. Even less known is that in the years 1943-1945, Zuse developed a high-level programming model and, based on it, an algorithmic programming language called Plankalkül (Plan Calculus). The Plankalkül features binary data structure types, thus supporting a loop-f... View full abstract»

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  • SWAC-Standards Western Automatic Computer: the Pioneer Day session at NCC July 1978

    Publication Year: 1997, Page(s):51 - 61
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (552 KB)

    This is an edited transcript of the Pioneer Day session that took place at the 1978 NCC Conference. It was a panel session, moderated by Harry Huskey, that included short talks by the people that built and used the SWAC computer. After Huskey's introduction, Harry T. Larson provided some of the engineering details of SWAC, R. Thorensen then told of some of the later developments that took place wi... View full abstract»

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  • Konrad Zuse's legacy: the architecture of the Z1 and Z3

    Publication Year: 1997, Page(s):5 - 16
    Cited by:  Papers (16)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB)

    Provides a detailed description of the architecture of the Z1 and Z3 computing machines that Konrad Zuse designed in Berlin between 1936 and 1941. The necessary basic information was obtained from a careful evaluation of the patent application Zuse filed in 1941. Additional insight was gained from a software simulation of the machine's logic. The Z1 was built using purely mechanical components; th... View full abstract»

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  • The SWAC design features and operating experience

    Publication Year: 1997, Page(s):46 - 50
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (828 KB)

    In 1953, the National Bureau of Standards Western Automatic Computer (SWAC) was an ultra-high-speed digital computer utilizing a Williams tube memory, an auxiliary magnetic drum memory and a punched card I/O system. A general description of the functional organization of the computer is given, together with a brief description of the various commands and how they were executed. Some of the special... View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Annals of the History of Computing serves as a record of vital contributions which recount, preserve, and analyze the history of computing and the impact of computing on society.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Nathan Ensmenger
Indiana University, School of Informatics & Computing
nensmeng@indiana.edu