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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date March 1997

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Comments on "Towards a framework for software measurement validation"

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 187 - 189
    Cited by:  Papers (12)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (23 KB)  

    A view of software measurement that disagrees with the model presented by Kitchenham, Pfleeger, and Fenton (1995), is given. Whereas Kitchenham et al. argue that properties used to define measures should not constrain the scale type of measures, the authors contend that that is an inappropriate restriction. In addition, a misinterpretation of Weyuker's (1988) properties is noted. View full abstract»

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  • Reply To: Comments On "towards A Framework Of Software Measurement Validation"

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 189
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (16 KB)  

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  • Comments on "Property-based software engineering measurement: refining the additivity properties"

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 190 - 197
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (75 KB)  

    The measure property set of Briand, Morasca, and Basili (1996) establishes the foundation of a real software measurement theory. Unfortunately, a number of inconsistencies related to additivity properties might hinder its acceptance and further elaboration. The authors show how to remove the ambiguity in the property definitions. View full abstract»

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  • Response To: Comments On "property-based Software Engineering Measurement: Refining The Additivity Properties"

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 196 - 197
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (32 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
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  • Using coverage information to predict the cost-effectiveness of regression testing strategies

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 146 - 156
    Cited by:  Papers (27)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (328 KB)  

    Selective regression testing strategies attempt to choose an appropriate subset of test cases from among a previously run test suite for a software system, based on information about the changes made to the system to create new versions. Although there has been a significant amount of research in recent years on the design of such strategies, there has been very little investigation of their cost-effectiveness. The paper presents some computationally efficient predictors of the cost-effectiveness of the two main classes of selective regression testing approaches. These predictors are computed from data about the coverage relationship between the system under test and its test suite. The paper then describes case studies in which these predictors were used to predict the cost-effectiveness of applying two different regression testing strategies to two software systems. In one case study, the TESTTUBE method selected an average of 88.1 percent of the available test cases in each version, while the predictor predicted that 87.3 percent of the test cases would be selected on average View full abstract»

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  • Assessing software review meetings: results of a comparative analysis of two experimental studies

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 129 - 145
    Cited by:  Papers (33)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (304 KB)  

    Software review is a fundamental tool for software quality assurance. Nevertheless, there are significant controversies as to the most efficient and effective review method. One of the most important questions currently being debated is the utility of meetings. Although almost all industrial review methods are centered around the inspection meeting, recent findings call their value into question. In prior research the authors separately and independently conducted controlled experimental studies to explore this issue. The paper presents new research to understand the broader implications of these two studies. To do this, they designed and carried out a process of “reconciliation” in which they established a common framework for the comparison of the two experimental studies, reanalyzed the experimental data with respect to this common framework, and compared the results. Through this process they found many striking similarities between the results of the two studies, strengthening their individual conclusions. It also revealed interesting differences between the two experiments, suggesting important avenues for future research View full abstract»

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  • CSPL: an Ada95-like, Unix-based process environment

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 171 - 184
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (168 KB)  

    The paper presents a new process-centered environment called “concurrent software process language” (CSPL). CSPL takes a unique and innovative approach to integrate the object-oriented Ada95-like syntax (for its modeling power) with Unix shell semantics (for its enactment capability) in a software process language. The paper depicts the following new CSPL features: (1) object orientation, (2) multirole and multiuser, and (3) unified object modeling. Language constructs specially designed for software process such as work assignment statement, communication-related statements, role unit, tool unit, relation unit and so on, are, respectively, described. The related work of this diversified field is also surveyed in some depth. The CSPL environment prototype has been built. A CSPL process program for the IEEE Software Process Modeling Example Problem has been developed and enacted to demonstrate the capabilities of this environment View full abstract»

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  • On the practical need for abstraction relations to verify abstract data type representations

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 157 - 170
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (380 KB)  

    The typical correspondence between a concrete representation and an abstract conceptual value of an abstract data type (ADT) variable (object) is a many-to-one function. For example, many different pointer aggregates give rise to exactly the same binary tree. The theoretical possibility that this correspondence generally should be relational has long been recognized. By using a nontrivial ADT for handling an optimization problem, the authors show why the need for generalizing from functions to relations arises naturally in practice. Making this generalization is among the steps essential for enhancing the practical applicability of formal reasoning methods to industrial-strength software systems View full abstract»

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  • Explicit communication revisited: two new attacks on authentication protocols

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 185 - 186
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (32 KB)  

    SSH and AKA are recent, practical protocols for secure connections over an otherwise unprotected network. The paper shows that, despite the use of public-key cryptography, SSH and AKA do not provide authentication as intended. The flaws of SSH and AKA can be viewed as the result of their disregarding a basic principle for the design of sound authentication protocols: the principle that messages should be explicit View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org