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Components, Packaging, and Manufacturing Technology, Part C, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Jan 1997

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Design for semiconductor manufacturing. Bibliography

    Page(s): 73 - 86
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    Interest in integrating the design and manufacture of semiconductor devices has been growing over the past decade. Often referred to as design for manufacture (DFM), integrated product development seeks to conceive and refine design alternatives that make the best use of manufacturing capabilities, in terms of the various materials, processes, tools, equipment, and facilities available to realize the design. While there is a large and growing literature on DFM generally, comparatively little of the published work addresses design for semiconductor manufacturing (DFSM) specifically, or the unique technologies and special circumstances of the semiconductor industry. In this paper, we present the results of a DFSM literature and software survey undertaken during the period June 1995 through August 1996. We describe the methods and sources used in the survey and include the complete abstracts of 61 articles determined to be most significant for DFSM. Also included is listing and brief description of some related software packages, which are available commercially or by anonymous ftp from a number of World Wide Web sites View full abstract»

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  • Real-time diagnosis of semiconductor manufacturing equipment using a hybrid neural network expert system

    Page(s): 39 - 47
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    This paper presents a tool for the real-time diagnosis of integrated circuit fabrication equipment. The approach focuses on integrating neural networks into an expert system. The system employs evidential reasoning to identify malfunctions by combining evidence originating from equipment maintenance history, on-line sensor data, and in-line post-process measurements. Neural networks are used in the maintenance phase of diagnosis to approximate the functional form of the failure history distribution of each component. Predicted failure rates are then converted to belief levels. For on-line diagnosis in the ease of previously unencountered faults, a CUSUM control chart is implemented on real sensor data to detect very small process shifts and their trends. For the known fault case, continuous hypothesis testing on the statistical mean and variance of the sensor data is performed to search for similar data patterns and assign belief levels. Finally, neural process models of process figures of merit (such as etch uniformity) derived from prior experimentation are used to analyze the in-line measurements, and identify the most suitable candidate among faulty input parameters (such as gas flow) to explain process shifts. A working prototype for this hybrid diagnostic system has been implemented on the Plasma Therm 700 series reactive ion etcher located in the Georgia Tech Microelectronics Research Center View full abstract»

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  • Mechatronics. An overview

    Page(s): 4 - 7
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    Mechatronics is a synergy of several engineering disciplines. It relates to the design and manufacture of intelligent electromechanical products and devices. Goods and services that are produced by using Mechatronics principles have become an intimate part of human lives in modern civilization. Mechatronics has become the backbone for sustaining high standard of living of people, as well as a nation's competitiveness in the global marketplace. Demands for engineers with adequate knowledge and experience in Mechatronics have drastically increased in the last decade. This paper attempts to offer readers an overview on this emerging engineering process View full abstract»

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  • Design for semiconductor manufacturing. Perspective

    Page(s): 58 - 72
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    The semiconductor industry is challenged to sustain the historical rate of exponential growth in product innovation and productivity for as long into the future as possible. If this challenge is to be met, substantial investments in chip-design automation are required to improve design capabilities and to narrow the widening gap between projected increases in device complexity and design productivity. Design for manufacture (DFM) is one potential means to leverage the required investment in design automation. DFM focuses on understanding how the design of a product interacts with the various processes and facilities available to make that product, in order to conceive and refine design alternatives that tend to optimize the product in the context of existing or projected manufacturing capabilities. In this paper, we review the current literature on DFM as applied in other industries and consider the relevance of state-of-the-art DFM principles and tools to improved efficiency and productivity within the semiconductor industry. We observe that, overall, many of the organizational structures for implementing DFM already exist within semiconductor firms and the industry more broadly. Moreover, much of the existing spectrum of layout, modeling, simulation, and analysis tools used for semiconductor device, process, equipment, and factory design can be thought of as components of a de facto system of design for semiconductor manufacturing (DFSM). While recent work aimed specifically at DFSM shows great promise, advances in the development of component design tools are lagging and integration of these tools into a coherent system for DFSM is only emerging. Systems integration of tools which characterize future processes and technologies will be needed in order to posit design rules which are sufficiently robust to allow their incorporation in industry-standard automated design and layout tools. The implications are that there is a need for accelerated improvements in DFSM tools and integration if historical semiconductor productivity growth is to be sustained View full abstract»

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  • Mechatronics challenge for the higher education world

    Page(s): 14 - 20
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    Mechatronics engineering courses at undergraduate and graduate levels, as well as vocational training courses are rapidly increasing across the world. Philosophy and structure of such courses divert from the classical single-discipline engineering programs and induce a challenge for the higher education institutions. Different institutions in various countries are reacting differently to this challenge but, all aiming at educating mechatronics engineers. This paper reviews the mechatronics education at various centers in the world. It also analyzes the structure and contents of a number of selected mechatronics programs in various higher education institutions. Furthermore, it proposes a list of features that a sound mechatronics engineering program should contain View full abstract»

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  • Micromechatronics and the miniaturization of structures, devices, and systems

    Page(s): 31 - 38
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    Mechatronics is the integration of electrical and electronic functions with mechanical and related functions. At the microscale, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) strives to integrate those functions as well. Therefore micromechatronics and MEMS are basically identical in nature. The integration of technologies goes beyond an assemblage of subsystems. A true micromechatronic system addresses all technologies simultaneously at the design stage so manufacturing processes may also be integrated. A family of surface driven electrostatic microactuators is given as an example of these philosophies. Device performance is given and these are compared with other microactuation principles, Additionally, micromechanical machining technologies, which are being used to help reduce the time and cost to develop prototypes, are presented and compared with more traditional lithographic technologies View full abstract»

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  • Design of modular digital circuits for testability

    Page(s): 48 - 57
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    Modular products and reconfigurable testing processes are crucial in modern manufacturing. This paper discusses the concept of product modularity, test modules of increased reusability and exchangeability, and some aspects of design for testability. A methodology for design of modular products for testability in the presence of testing modules is developed. An integrated approach to design of modular products and test processes is discussed. The relationship between product modularity and design for testability is explored. This paper focuses on digital circuits which may be difficult to decompose into modules. The impact of testability on module sizes is considered. The testability points are identified at the circuit level while modular testing is considered at the board and system level. The main contribution of this paper is in the development of a formal approach to modularize products, and to assess the impact of modularity on the design process and testability View full abstract»

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  • Case studies on design of mechatronic products

    Page(s): 8 - 13
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    Two case studies on the design of mechatronic products are presented here. These cases were written by authors of distinct backgrounds. The first case study was developed by Burford Furman, an academician with strong industrial experience. It is related to the design of atomic force microscopes (AFM's) for measuring the topography of surfaces at submicron precision. The case demonstrates the application of the principles of mechanics, e.g., beam theory, use of piezoelectric actuators, high precision motion control, and manufacturing methods which can produce structures that are responsive to minute disturbances yet have sufficiently high resonant frequencies. This case is an example where materials engineering plays a significant role in the design of a mechatronic product. The second case was written by two senior engineers, D. Pinkernell and S. Elgee, from the Hewlett-Packard Company. The ingenuity of integrating mechanical components (motors, gears, belts, shafts, etc.), optoelectronics sensors, microprocessors, power IC's, and computer software to produce this popular mechatronic product is demonstrated View full abstract»

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  • Mechatronics in storage technology

    Page(s): 21 - 30
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    Storage technology is an essential part of computing. The most common device currently in use to store data is the direct access storage device (DASD) or disk drives as they are commonly known. Since their inception in 1956, DASD's have undergone a revolutionary change, and now several generations later store, retrieve, and archive massive quantities of data reliably at a rate (data rate) that renders “real-time” computing, graphical display, and other forms of data processing possible. The demand for data storage continues to increase very rapidly and therefore, the designers of disk drives continue to push the limits and find new frontiers in recording. At the same time, new methods of recording to increase the data densities and data rate are being pursued. Phase change optical recording and magneto-optical recording show promise for data storage for multimedia applications on one hand and inexpensive storage and retrieval devices such as magnetic tape drives are in wide use for common storage needs where data rate is of little significance. In designing of these devices, expertise in many disciplines such as electromagnetics, mechanics, tribology, heat and mass transfer, mechanical design and dynamics of mechanisms is required and the design process is very complicated. In this article, we will study how these disciplines come together and are linked together. Thus Mechatronics in the disk drives applications means study of interactive effects of disciplines listed above View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Transaction ceased production in 1998. The current publication is titled IEEE Transactions on Components, Packaging, and Manufacturing Technology.

Full Aims & Scope