By Topic

Computing & Control Engineering Journal

Issue 1 • Date Feb. 1997

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • Hospital computing: technology versus people

    Page(s): 4 - 8
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (653 KB)  

    This is a story of 24 months in an NHS Trust Hospital (in the UK) as experienced by an engineer who abandoned pure engineering to become a computer systems professional (to use a phrase of the times). Having spent 11 years in the industrial sector working on medium to large system control systems, one takes the skills and experience obtained and translates them into pure analysis and creating a practical and realistic solution. This is not singularly a technical solution, it involves people, and hence the subtitle of 'technology versus people'. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Up, up and away with computer power

    Page(s): 9 - 14
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1889 KB)  

    There is a certain irony in that a technology which was first developed in 18th century France has now become inextricably linked with leading edge computer based systems and technologies. Hot air balloons and other lighter than air flying machines have come an awful long way in every sense since the Montgolfier brothers' flimsy paper craft first took to the skies in 1783. A quantum leap in burner technology in the 1950s led to a resurgence of interest in ballooning, but today's 'special shape' promotional craft and recreational balloons are made possible through the application of the very latest materials and computer related design technologies. Described as the ultimate challenge in aviation, the attempt to circumnavigate the world by balloon relies on computer power at every single stage, from design concept to final touchdown. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Eliminating the 'hard'/'soft' real-time dichotomy

    Page(s): 15 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (730 KB)  

    A brief and informal overview is given of a new framework which permits timeliness to be expressed and enforced for the whole real time continuum in a well defined and general way. The framework has been successfully implemented and used experimentally. The new model of timeliness which was created is called the benefit accrual model. It is a framework for expressing timeliness requirements across a wide spectrum of real time hardness and softness in a unified and well defined manner-timeliness is a continuum of softness, in which 'hard' is one end point. This model is a generalisation of the earlier time value functional model (E.D. Jensen et al., 1985) in the Alpha kernel. The framework is based on three orthogonal functions for specifying timeliness: the time constraint for individual computations; the collective timeliness of a set of computations; and the acceptability of collective timeliness of a set of computations. First, the author introduces the idea of timeliness as a scoped attribute of a computation. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Distributed fieldbus and control network systems

    Page(s): 21 - 32
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1665 KB)  

    One of the fastest growing market segments among control and automation technologies is the introduction and development of control network systems. Although fieldbus systems have been used for several years in industrial automation, control network systems opened the market to different application areas, such as home and building automation. The current activities in both fieldbus and control network systems are causing confusion amongst companies and consumers using control equipment. The article shows the differences between fieldbus and control network systems, considers the different application areas, reviews the most popular control systems, and provides useful contact addresses for further inquiries. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • High performance computing-past, present and future

    Page(s): 33 - 42
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2120 KB)  

    In the desktop networked PC age, does high performance computing have a future? Drawing on the history of the computer and the present state of the art, the article concludes that HPC is alive and well, with healthy prospects for many years to come. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

Published from 2003-2007, Computing and Control Engineering was concerned with computing, communications, control and instrumentation.

Full Aims & Scope