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Personal Communications, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Feb 1997

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
  • Mobile packet data technology: an insight into MOBITEX architecture

    Page(s): 10 - 18
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3084 KB)  

    Mobile data networks offer a cost-effective and efficient alternative for data communication. In order to present some aspects of mobile data technology, this article offers some insight into the basic networking layers of a popular and widely deployed network, MOBITEX. MOBITEX technology offers a versatile architecture to support wireless packet data service inside an extended geographical area with internetwork roaming and interoperability features. This technology has become quite popular, mainly due to its open architecture and its vast equipment/applications availability. The authors provide an overview of the MOBITEX architecture, services, and subscription types, and a detailed examination of the network, data link, and physical layers. The power-saving features of MOBITEX are also discussed View full abstract»

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  • A narrowband approach to efficient PCS spectrum sharing through decentralized DCA access policies

    Page(s): 24 - 35
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    This article addresses spectrum sharing and open access for personal communications services (PCS). Traditional regulation has allocated electromagnetic spectrum through fragmentation into mutually exclusive frequency blocks. Block allocation schemes produce trunking inefficiencies in the use of multiple narrowband RF channels. Broadband allocation schemes such as code division multiple access (CDMA) can accommodate multiple users on a single RF channel. Due to the near-far problem, the only way competing CDMA operators could share common spectrum is through collocation of cell sites, which hinders market mechanisms. An alternative approach is narrowband spectrum sharing through a decentralized dynamic channel assignment (DCA) approach, such as autonomous reuse partitioning (ARP). Multiple-operator DCA allocation schemes for low-tier PCS systems have been proposed in some countries. Under such an approach, competing operators use a common air interface to share the available spectrum. Open access can improve opportunities for competition in the provision of PCS. Other things being equal, a multi-operator DCA system outperforms that achievable by multiple carriers under a traditional fragmented spectrum, even for overlapping networks and unequal traffic loads. In this article we use a discrete event simulation to explore the spectrum efficiency implications of adopting a narrowband decentralized DCA/ARP spectrum-sharing policy. We explore as well regulatory measures so operators will deploy infrastructure instead of appropriating channels from competitors View full abstract»

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  • A simulation study of urban in-building cellular frequency reuse

    Page(s): 19 - 23
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    This article describes a simulation methodology for accessing capacity of secondary indoor wireless systems that share spectrum with conventional outdoor cellular systems. The techniques described may be used to predict the capacity of the indoor system over a multiyear time window. The results for the channel capacity for indoor “parasitic” cellular systems in a 48-story office building are presented over a 6-year time window. The simulations illustrate that the capacity of the indoor system varies with time as well as with the height above ground. Parasitic indoor systems are assumed to operate with RF power levels low enough that they cause negligible interference to the outdoor cellular system, so this work concentrated on the interference to the indoor system caused by the outdoor cellular (macrocellular) network View full abstract»

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  • European R&D programs on third-generation mobile communication systems

    Page(s): 46 - 52
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    European third-generation mobile communication systems aim to deliver new wideband multimedia services to the customer and to integrate all the different services of second-generation systems. The enabling platforms, technologies, and applications are the subject of thorough research in the framework of the ACTS R&D program, which is funded by the European Community and follows the RACE program. In the context of mobile and personal communications, the RACE program aimed at the development and validation of the necessary key technologies and concepts that would in the future constitute the “building blocks” of third-generation of mobile communication systems. The integration of these technology “building blocks” into a single new system constitutes the challenge that lies ahead for the ACTS program View full abstract»

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  • Signal stability-based adaptive routing (SSA) for ad hoc mobile networks

    Page(s): 36 - 45
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    Ad hoc networks have no spatial hierarchy and suffer from frequent link failures which prevent mobile hosts from using traditional routing schemes. Under these conditions, mobile hosts must find routes to destinations without the use of designated routers and also must dynamically adapt the routes to the current link conditions. This article proposes a distributed adaptive routing protocol for finding and maintaining stable routes based on signal strength and location stability in an ad hoc network and presents an architecture for its implementation. Interoperability with mobile IP (Internet protocol) is discussed View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Magazine ceased publication in 2001. The current retitled publication is IEEE Wireless Communications.

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