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Potentials, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Feb.-March 1997

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Potentials

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 1 - 2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Calling for control

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 31 - 32
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    A cordless telephone system (or as it is sometimes called a low power personal communications services system) provides telephone services to moving users. The Cordless Telephone Second generation (CT2) is a digital cordless telephone system developed in Europe in 1989. The CT2 system provides high speech quality (32 kb/s speech rate) with low power consumption (the maximum transmit power is 10 mW). While the radio aspect of CT2 has been extensively discussed, the network aspect is seldom mentioned in the literature. This article introduces the CT2 call control procedures (specifically, call origination and call delivery) from the network aspect. We first describe the call control procedures for a private CT2 system in a company building. Then we describe the procedures for a public CT2 system. View full abstract»

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  • Looking back: Sputnik

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 36 - 40
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    Briefly discusses the circumstances leading to the launch of Sputnik 1. Radio observations of the signal are described leading to an ephemeris. The radio transmissions of the very early satellites are considered from an ionospheric research point of view. The author concludes by discussing the Nora-Alice payload for transmitting radio signals from satellites for ionospheric research View full abstract»

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  • Cadmium telluride-solar powering its way to a semiconductor advantage

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 23 - 26
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    Cadmium telluride is a compound semiconductor. It is used in solar cells, X-ray detectors, and gamma ray detectors. Cadmium telluride is well suited for use in solar cells, because its energy band gap is a good match with the solar spectrum. This means it has one of the highest potential efficiencies in solar cells. Also, because cadmium telluride is a thin film, it allows solar cells to be manufactured more cheaply than other materials. Because semiconductors have many applications, there has been a lot of research on different materials and their properties. Most research has been done on silicon and germanium, with silicon currently considered the most general purpose semiconductor. However, research has been done on other “high performance” semiconductors for specific applications. Cadmium telluride falls into this category View full abstract»

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  • In search of Galactic company [SETI/CETI]

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 5 - 7
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    The author briefly discusses the possibility of interstellar travel and then goes on to consider communication with an extraterrestrial civilization using radio. Various means by which extraterrestrial civilizations may be detected are discussed. The author gives an idea of the work being carried out today for SETI/CETI View full abstract»

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  • Silicon carbide: its nonabrasive electrical properties and applications

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 27 - 30
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    Silicon carbide (SiC) has been around for over a century. However, only in the past two to three decades has its semiconducting properties been sufficiently studied and applied. Its many advantages, with its ability to withstand high temperatures being the most prominent, are making silicon carbide a choice for new applications and an improved substitute for traditional electronic materials View full abstract»

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  • Synthetic array radar

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 8 - 11
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    The article discusses radar imaging or synthetic array radar (SAR). The most obvious advantage of SAR mapping is that it is all-weather. Radio waves can generally penetrate clouds, fog, and haze; so mapping is not hampered by atmospheric conditions. However, if the rain is heavy enough, the radar signal can to some extent indicate how hard it is raining. Since radar provides its own illumination, maps can be made night or day. Moreover, when mapping with radar, both the angle and the direction of the illumination can be changed. As with visual and infrared systems, when carried in a satellite, an SAR can map large areas in a very short time. SAR has even more advantages. Since it can sense distance as well as angle, it can map in three dimensions. This radar system represents a major technological step forward for spaceborne radar observations. The pictures in this article were collected during two space shuttle flights in April and October 1994. These two flights sampled the same sites during two different seasons to study the Earth's ecosystems, climatic and geological processes, the water cycle and ocean circulation View full abstract»

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  • Quest for understanding sciences

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 12 - 15
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    Understanding scientific principles generates many benefits. Comprehension is the key to creativity. It is highly unlikely that an individual without the command of basic principles will be the author of scientific breakthroughs. Understanding the conditions in which mathematical tools of science have been developed is the key to efficient research. The scientist or the engineer who lacks such understanding often ends up in dead end pursuits. Understanding the principles of operating machinery or apparatuses is the key to diagnosing their malfunctions. An individual who cannot come up with the correct diagnosis cannot be an efficient problem solver. Finally, the understanding of scientific principles by the general population is the best defense against fear of the unknown. This fear often stands in the way of technological progress and our improved well being as well. Armed with this insight, and pondering the questions that are seldom asked and even less often answered in science classes, the project CoLoS (Conceptual Learning of Science) was developed View full abstract»

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  • Simulating computer systems

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 16 - 18
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    Simulation is a good way to investigate performance and behavior of computer systems/networks under various input conditions. The importance for simulation in studying such systems includes: impracticality of dealing directly with the system/network; cost of studying the system/network directly, which may be too high; and the complexity of a mathematical model precluding any possibility of an analytical solution. A reasonable approach to obtaining a manageable model of the system consists of abstracting its features and properties. Particular attention is paid to those pertinent to the study. When we are doing modeling and simulation, we are concerned not only with the elements viz. the real system, model and computer, but also with establishing certain relationships among them. In particular, modeling deals primarily with the relationships between real systems and models. This article is intended to provide a broad overview of various aspects involved in simulating computer systems and assumes a basic knowledge of probability distributions. The simulation of a single server queueing system is also considered View full abstract»

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  • The multiagent approach [geophysics]

    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 19 - 22
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
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    Complex systems can be defined as systems with behavior that is poorly understood. These systems appear in a large variety of fields, such as natural phenomena. Modeling natural phenomena is an interesting challenge because natural phenomena, such as earthquakes, hurricanes and volcanoes, can cause severe damage. What's more, in this area, most classical models have failed both to understand the underlying physical processes and to predict future behavior. Our approach is to consider macro-behavior (i.e., the result of the program execution) as the result of a set of interactions among smaller, independent entities. The whole system is then distributed among these entities, called agents. Our research project, named GEOMAS (GEOphysics and MultiAgent Systems), was started in 1994. As a test case, a complex system dealing with predicting volcano eruptions has been investigated. In particular, we studied the volcano of La Fournaise in La Reunion island View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Potentials is the magazine dedicated to undergraduate and graduate students and young professionals.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
David Tian
Carnegie Mellon University
david.tian@ieee.org