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Professional Communication, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date March 1997

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • Electronic Literacies in the Workplace: Technologies of Writ-ing [Book Reviews]

    Page(s): 54 - 55
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Human Factors for Technical Communicators [Book Reviews]

    Page(s): 55 - 56
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The Complete Guide to Writing and Producing Technical Manuals and Handbook for Preparing Engineering Documents: From Concept to Completion [Book Reviews]

    Page(s): 56 - 57
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Writing Like an Engineer: A Rhetorical Education [Book Revews]

    Page(s): 58 - 59
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    Freely Available from IEEE
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  • Measuring the translatability of Simplified English in procedural documents

    Page(s): 4 - 12
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    The paper reports the results of a study that tested the translatability of a restricted language, called Simplified English (SE), as used in maintenance procedures in the airline industry. The study examined the effect of document type (SE versus non-SE) and procedure (procedure A versus procedure B) on the quality and ease of translation for native speakers of Spanish, Chinese, or Japanese. The results reveal that SE may be more effectively translated by native Spanish speakers than by Chinese speakers. The paper concludes with a discussion of methodological issues that researchers should consider when running such translation studies View full abstract»

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  • Groupware: if you build it, they may not come

    Page(s): 48 - 53
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    Groupware software promises to increase productivity by providing users with a common interface from which they may access a variety of software programs that they may then work with in a variety of ways. While groupware technology can perform the many tasks it is designed to do, it is more difficult for people to become comfortable and productive with new technological tools. This is especially true for groupware because it is more than a just new tool: groupware fundamentally changes the way an organization works and communicates. The corporate culture must either be ready for groupware or adapt itself to address the cultural premises of groupware (shared effort, cooperation, collaboration) that the software is designed to enhance. The commentary describes the experience of one organization as it struggled to re-engineer itself using groupware View full abstract»

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  • Intel's Pentium chip crisis: an ethical analysis

    Page(s): 13 - 19
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    In October 1994 a mathematics professor informed the Intel Corporation that its Pentium chip had a flaw which caused mathematical errors. Intel's response to the professor and its customers created a backlash of anger and a public relations crisis. By analyzing Intel's actions using the work of two relevant ethical philosophies, the article shows that some of the company's errors in public relations were also ethical errors. However, it also points out that Intel has made improvements which will help it avoid future problems and which could set an ethical precedent for the semiconductor industry View full abstract»

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  • How public relations professionals are managing the potential for sabotage, rumors, and misinformation disseminated via the Internet by computer hackers

    Page(s): 28 - 33
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    The paper examines how public relations professionals are dealing with the potential for sabotage, rumors, and misinformation spread via the Internet by computer hackers. The author examines the public relations profession from a systems theory perspective and attempts to outline skills necessary for organizational survival in the new information age. Original data was gathered from a sample population of 41 (n=85 for a 48% response rate) public relations professionals from the membership directory of the Public Relations Society of America. The author concluded from the data that the majority of public relations professionals currently view the Internet as a one-way communication channel. In addition, the data supported the notion that public relations professionals are limited by their lack of understanding of the two-way communication potential of the medium, the speed and power of messages traveling in cyberspace, and the current legal climate as it relates to Internet activity View full abstract»

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  • Videoconferencing as a communication tool

    Page(s): 41 - 47
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    With videoconferencing available on the desktop, the technology is becoming feasible for small- to medium-sized companies, as well as mobile workers. Videoconferencing applications range from internal company communications, educating and training remote employees, to telecommuting. It can even eliminate certain travel requirements, thereby cutting costs. In spite of several factors which are fueling the growth in videoconferencing, early projections have been overly optimistic. A literature review reveals that many technological and other barriers are preventing videoconferencing from gaining mainstream popularity. Users are primarily concerned with the costs of hardware and usage, interoperability, and poor quality. Advancements in compression algorithms and chip speed have made videoconferencing affordable to more people in the last decade. However, a video signal with quality acceptable only to some is still very costly and relatively complicated to utilize with the transport capabilities of today. Some say the turning point will not occur until hardware prices drop enough for video to become an add-on to users' PCs View full abstract»

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  • Tackling the needs of foreign academic writers: a case study

    Page(s): 20 - 25
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    Foreign engineers and scientists must publish their research in professional journals in English, but they often lack the proficiency and skills to do so successfully. The commentary describes a course that teaches these skills to Ph.D. students before they enter the job market. The techniques described are also effective tools for teaching professionals in the workplace View full abstract»

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  • “Who's reading my e-mail?”: a study of professionals' e-mail usage and privacy perceptions in the workplace

    Page(s): 34 - 40
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    E-mail privacy in the workplace has emerged as one of the most complex ethical and legal issues confronting corporate communication in the electronic age. The paper discusses the array of legal and ethical concerns of e-mail privacy in the workplace. Building on the existing body of knowledge on the topic, the results of a research study are presented which explore the similarities and differences in e-mail usage and privacy perceptions among management level and administrative level employees. The survey, which polled 337 working professionals, confirmed the popular belief that companies are not effectively communicating their e-mail monitoring policies to their employees. Finally, recommendations are made to corporate communicators on how best to forge an e-mail communications policy that can reduce the risk of disputes, incidents, and lawsuits regarding e-mail privacy issues View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication is a peer-reviewed journal devoted to applied research on professional communication--including but not limited to technical and business communication. It has been published since 1957 by the Professional Communication Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Saul Carliner
Concordia University