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MultiMedia, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date Fall 1996

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Displaying Results 1 - 17 of 17
  • Computing in Natural Environments

    Page(s): 3 - 4
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  • Microsoft Addresses the Web

    Page(s): 5 - 6
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  • Traffic Safety Activities in Japan

    Page(s): 16 - 17
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  • A VRML Primer with Depth

    Page(s): 90
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • A Cornerstone for a New Niche

    Page(s): 91
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • A Broad Guide to Data Compression

    Page(s): 91 - 92
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  • Networking Book Gives General Coverage

    Page(s): 92
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  • Hierarchical storage management in a distributed VOD system

    Page(s): 37 - 47
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    The article describes the storage management algorithms in the Berkeley Video-on-Demand System, a hierarchical storage management system designed to support transparent access to thousands of hours of video material. Storage management algorithms handle continuous media objects stored on video servers within a hierarchical distributed video-on-demand system. Media objects stored permanently on tertiary storage devices are moved to video servers when needed. Algorithms manage the distributed cache in the video servers and select a video server on which to place a requested object. The object-placement algorithm uses server load, network load, and service-wait times to optimize system performance View full abstract»

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  • Technology and the news: what we don't know

    Page(s): 73 - 77
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    It is the contention of the News in the Future research consortium at the MIT Media Laboratory that effective communication requires messages rich in description. These descriptions, when created with consideration of the context of both the individual and the community receiving them, can result in an engaging and useful message. The critical underlying technologies of information technology are those that give the user access and relevancy. These technologies include machine understanding of content, observation of context, and instructive mediation between message provider and message recipient. Just as critical as the engineering issues are questions of how information technology becomes: a part of the social fabric within communities; a catalyst for creating communities of interest; and a means of facilitating community introspection. The author poses questions of what is not known about the impact of technology on news. The discussion of what is not known is organized into five categories: cognition, context, communication, community, and commerce. In articulating questions, he briefly mentions some of the working systems being developed at MIT that hopefully will provide the insight necessary to answer these questions View full abstract»

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  • Content-based classification, search, and retrieval of audio

    Page(s): 27 - 36
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    Many audio and multimedia applications would benefit from the ability to classify and search for audio based on its characteristics. The audio analysis, search, and classification engine described here reduces sounds to perceptual and acoustical features. This lets users search or retrieve sounds by any one feature or a combination of them, by specifying previously learned classes based on these features, or by selecting or entering reference sounds and asking the engine to retrieve similar or dissimilar sounds View full abstract»

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  • Quality-of-service support for multimedia applications

    Page(s): 78 - 82
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    A major project at Lancaster University is the development of network infrastructures capable of supporting the quality-of-service (QoS) requirements of a wide range of distributed multimedia applications. The project includes more than thirty researchers and covers not only the network support but also the enabling technologies. The authors believe that QoS development cannot be done in isolation from the applications to be supported, which must form an integral part of the project. They focus on three application areas: interactive teaching and learning, mobile systems, and virtual reality. They chose applications that stretch network support to its limit. To realize the full potential of these distributed multimedia applications, the underlying network must satisfy all these requirements concurrently. They give a brief overview of their activities to this end and discuss the need for QoS support View full abstract»

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  • Cost-based program allocation for distributed multimedia-on-demand systems

    Page(s): 62 - 72
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    Examining multimedia program allocation in distributed multimedia-on-demand systems lets us consider how best to provide programs at will from geographically scattered servers. Each user is associated with a local server but can transparently access any program located at any server. The authors consider user demand for various programs, storage limitations of the multimedia servers, and costs of storing and transporting the programs View full abstract»

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  • Extending visual languages for multimedia

    Page(s): 18 - 26
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    Visual languages, which let users customize iconic sentences, can be extended to accommodate multimedia objects, letting users access media dynamically. Teleaction objects, or multimedia objects with knowledge structures, can be designed using visual languages to automatically respond to events and perform tasks like “find related books” in a virtual library View full abstract»

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  • Indexes are “out”, models are “in”

    Page(s): 10 - 15
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    What would it take to build a search engine possessing the knowledge, intelligence, and resourcefulness of my favorite research librarian? Her ability to interpret my inquiries, knowledgeably expand them, and then extrapolate them into a rich model for search and retrieval makes her an invaluable and pleasurable resource. She takes pride in knowing her library thoroughly, both spatially (where to physically find a book) and temporally (how her book inventory has changed and evolved). As she formulates her plan of attack, her sophisticated understanding of language, culture, experience, and other knowledge domain models simultaneously converge and are re-mapped onto the reality of her library. The task of information retrieval becomes an interactive adventure of human dimensions, full of the satisfaction of continuous discovery. Keyword matching is a crude and unsatisfying method for sampling the information content of complex sources such as the World Wide Web. These truncated representations fail to model the larger meaning embedded within the source-they leave behind all vital contextual information, and they strip away any basis for appraising the quality and veracity of the source. The worthless appears as the equal of the worthy. In the electronic future, when all books are digitized and available on line, I pray that we have a more skilled and interesting guide than Yahoo or WebCrawler staffing the circulation desk View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The magazine contains technical information covering a broad range of issues in multimedia systems and applications

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
John R. Smith
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center