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Micro, IEEE

Issue 6 • Date Dec 1996

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Displaying Results 1 - 13 of 13
  • The microprocessor today

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 32 - 44
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (16)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3036 KB)  

    Outlines technology and business issues in today's microprocessor industry. From their humble beginnings 25 years ago, microprocessors have proliferated into an astounding range of chips, powering devices ranging from telephones to supercomputers. Today, microprocessors for personal computers get widespread attention-and have enabled Intel to become the world's largest semiconductor maker. In addition, embedded microprocessors are at the heart of a diverse range of devices that have become staples of consumers worldwide. Microprocessors have become specialized in many ways. Those for desktop computers fall into classes based on their instruction set architectures: either x86, the primary surviving complex instruction set computing (CISC) architecture, or one of the five major reduced instruction set computing (RISC) architectures-PA-RISC, Mips, Spare, Alpha, and PowerPC. Such chips typically integrate few functions other than cache memory and bus interfaces with the processor but usually include a floating-point unit and memory management unit. Embedded microprocessors, on the other hand, typically do not have floating-point or memory management units but often integrate various peripheral functions with the processor to reduce system cost. View full abstract»

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  • The future of microprocessors

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 46 - 53
    Cited by:  Papers (18)  |  Patents (25)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3494 KB)  

    Before making statements about microprocessor trends 10 years out-Micro 2006-it might be useful to revisit our past statements (Gelsinger et al. (1989, 1991)) about the microprocessor of today and the microprocessor of 2000. Then we can see where we have been right and where wrong. This retrospective will reveal important trends that promise to give some insight into the microprocessor of the next decade. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE MICRO ANNUAL INDEX Volume 16, 1996

    Publication Year: 1996
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1291 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Industrial Strength SGML: An Introduction to Enterprise Publishing [Micro Review]

    Publication Year: 1996
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (223 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • HTML 3.2 & CGI Unleashed [Micro Review]

    Publication Year: 1996
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (138 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Platinum Edition Using Windows [Micro Review]

    Publication Year: 1996
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (138 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • An ASIC chip set for parallel fuzzy database mining

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 60 - 67
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1196 KB)  

    We designed and built an application-specific digital architecture aimed at mining fuzzy databases. The semi custom chip set is fully functional, and a 16-unit system provides a speedup of 500 times over the algorithm (in software) running on a Sun Sparc2 workstation View full abstract»

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  • The microprocessor's impact on society

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 54 - 59
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (592 KB)  

    So microprocessors are everywhere, but how is modern life different as a result? Microelectronics obviously has improved life in many ways: automation of boring and dangerous manual labor, advances in medical technology and weather forecasting, and applications of computing technology to aid the disabled, to name but a few. Indeed, the easy answer is that microprocessors have transformed modern society. They affect the way we work and play, the way we travel and communicate. They offer remarkable processing power at remarkably low cost. Silicon Valley pioneer Jerry Sanders, founder of Advanced Micro Devices, claims that if the automobile's efficiency and cost had improved at the same rate as the microprocessor's, a Rolls-Royce would now cost about three dollars and get three million miles to the gallon. But has the microprocessor fulfilled its earliest promises? View full abstract»

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  • SyncLink: high-speed DRAM for the future

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 74 - 75
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (96)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (180 KB)  

    In 1987 it was becoming apparent that computer systems would need to communicate at data rates beyond the capabilities of then current approaches. To take on this challenge, the IEEE Futurebus group formed a new group dedicated to building a fast, coherent interface, scalable from the smallest computer to the largest mainframe. The IEEE officially established the SCI (Scalable Coherent Interface) working group, referenced as IEEE P1596, in 1988. Today the SCI is IEEE Std 1596. It has several derivatives that enhance its operation and meet additional needs such as real-time operations: a differential voltage specification (IEEE 1536.3), a point-to-point memory interface (IEEE 1596.4), and SyncLink (IEEE P1596.7). SyncLink is a new, high-speed memory interface that combines synchronous dynamic RAM (SDRAM), developed in the late 1980s, and the IEEE's RamLink interface, developed in 1990. SyncLink uses the earlier interface's packet protocol as a base but eliminates its point-to-point link to reduce latency. The new interface uses SDRAM's internal pipelining and control for efficient bus utilization. It allows access in the lowest latency possible for a very high bandwidth DRAM. Future plans include data rates of 800 Mbits per pin per second in 1998, to double in the early 2000s. This rate will allow systems to operate at full capability, even when running 3D graphics View full abstract»

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  • A participant's perspective

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 21 - 31
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3500 KB)  

    Presents the history of the microprocessor as told by an active participant. The author looks at the state of the computer industry before 1970, and how this led into the beginning of microprocessors. After discussing the early days of microprocessors, he goes on to look at the industry in the 1980's, the current state of the art, and future trends View full abstract»

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  • The history of the 4004

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 10 - 20
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3004 KB)  

    Twenty-five years ago, in November 1971, an advertisement appeared in Electronic News: “Announcing a new era in integrated electronics, a microprogrammable computer on a chip”. The ad was placed by Intel Corporation of Santa Clara, California, then just over three years old. From that modest but prophetic beginning, the microprocessor market has grown into a multibillion-dollar business, and Intel has maintained a leadership position, particularly in microprocessors for personal computers. The authors look at the design and development of the 4004 View full abstract»

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  • Don't call it a highway!

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 78 - 79
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    Where did the information superhighway come from? Highways and information technology seem to have nothing in common. The author discusses the use of the term “highway”, and considers its unsuitability for IT View full abstract»

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  • Micro law: patenting computerized methods of doing business

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 4 - 6, 75
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (556 KB)  

    E-Data's patent on the idea of selling merchandise over the Net is only one of many ambitious schemes to patent computerized methods of doing business. Another example, involved in a pending appeal before the Federal Circuit (the patent appeals court) is the Boes patent of the State Street Bank case. The many ambitious schemes and this pending appeal raise the nonlegal issue (which the court is unlikely to address) of whether it is good public policy to have patents on computerized methods of doing business View full abstract»

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High-quality technical articles from designers, systems integrators, and users discussing the design, performance, or application of microcomputer and microprocessor systems.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Erik R. Altman
School of Electrical and Computer Engineering
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center