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Parallel & Distributed Technology: Systems & Applications, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date Winter 1996

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Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • Parallel Architectures

    Publication Year: 1996
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  • Index, volume 4, 1996

    Publication Year: 1996
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Topics in advanced scientific computation [Book Reviews]

    Publication Year: 1996
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Parallel processing in cellular arrays [Book Reviews]

    Publication Year: 1996
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Integrated personal computers in a distributed client-serverr environment [Book Reviews]

    Publication Year: 1996
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Parallel computing works [Book reviews]

    Publication Year: 1996
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Advances in distributed sensor technology [Book Reviews]

    Publication Year: 1996
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Fault-tolerant computer system design [Book Reviews]

    Publication Year: 1996
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Techniques for compiler-directed cache coherence

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 23 - 34
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (3)
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    The performance of large scale shared memory multiprocessors can be greatly improved if they can cache remote shared data in the private caches of the processors. However, maintaining cache coherence for such systems remains a challenge. Although hardware directory schemes give good performance, they might be too complicated and expensive for large scale multiprocessors. The article provides a comprehensive guide of an alternative approach, called compiler directed cache coherence techniques. Compiler directed techniques maintain coherence of caches locally by individual processors, eliminating the need for directory hardware and interprocessor communication. We survey the state of the art software and hardware compiler directed techniques and discuss the basic concepts and issues. We also demonstrate the feasibility and performance of compiler directed cache coherence by presenting a case study of the Two Phase Invalidation scheme View full abstract»

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  • Performance prediction. A case study using a scalable shared-virtual memory machine

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 36 - 49
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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    As computers with tens of thousands of processors successfully deliver high performance power for solving some of the so called “grand challenge” applications, scalability is becoming an important metric in the evaluation of parallel architectures and algorithms. The authors carefully investigate the prediction of scalability and its application. With a simple formula, they show the relation between scalability, single processor computing power, and degradation of parallelism. They conduct a case study on a multi ring KSR-1 shared virtual memory machine. However, the prediction formula and methodology proposed in the study are not bound to any algorithm or architecture. They can be applied to any algorithm-machine combination. Experimental and theoretical results show that the influence of variation of ensemble size is predictable. Therefore, the performance of an algorithm on a sophisticated, hierarchical architecture can be predicted, and the best algorithm-machine combination can be selected for a given application View full abstract»

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  • Mobility management for cellular telephony networks

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 65 - 73
    Cited by:  Papers (18)
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    Cellular telephony provides voice and data services to mobile users. To deliver these services, the cellular network can track the locations of the users, and can allow user movement during the conversations. It achieves these capabilities through small scale (handoff) and large scale (roaming) mobility management. The authors describe mobility management in cellular networks, including the details of different handoff schemes, location tracking schemes, and call delivery procedures View full abstract»

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  • Cache memories for dataflow systems

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 50 - 64
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    The dataflow model of computation, particularly the recent trend in combining dataflow processing with control flow processing, provides attractive alternatives for designing new computer architectures. This marriage has also motivated researchers to analyze how to apply the familiar concepts within the framework of this new architectural model. The concept of cache memory has proven its effectiveness in the traditional control flow architecture because of the spatial and temporal localities that govern the organization of the conventional programming environment. Therefore, the authors investigate the presence of localities in dataflow programs and analyze whether the cache can be incorporated into dataflow architectures. Addressing the application of cache memory in the dataflow environment, the authors compare the control flow and dataflow programming environments, address previous work to incorporate cache in the dataflow computation, and discuss how to improve and detect locality in a dataflow program View full abstract»

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  • Assessing the performance of the new IBM SP2 communication subsystem

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 12 - 22
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
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    IBM has recently launched an upgrade of the communication subsystem of its SP2 parallel computer. This change affects both hardware and software elements: high performance switch, message interface adapters, and a new implementation of the MPI message passing library. To characterize to what extent these changes will affect the execution times of parallel applications, the authors have run a collection of benchmarks on an SP2 with the old communication subsystem and on the same machine after upgrade. These benchmarks include point to point and collective communication tests as well as a set of complete parallel applications. The performance indicators are the latency and throughput exhibited by the basic communication tests, and the execution time in the case of real applications. Results indicate that only under certain circumstances does a significant performance increase result View full abstract»

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  • Personal privacy: an endangered species in the information age?

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 4 - 7
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    In mid-September (1996) there was a flurry of angry email messages flying around the Internet, discussing the news that personal information about you could be purchased from the company by just about anyone with a credit card. Many were outraged at the loss of their privacy, and Lexis-Nexis was flooded with requests from netizens demanding removal of their personal data from the database. P-Trak, the company's personal information database product, was introduced last June by Lexis-Nexis. This 300 million name database of public information culled from credit bureau records contains each person's name, maiden/alias name, current and two most recent previous addresses, month and year of birth, and phone number. When the product first came out, it included Social Security numbers as well, but that feature was pulled less than two weeks after the product's initial release. However, if you have a Social Security number, you can still search the database (for a fee, of course) for related data. Compared to many other databases, such as those containing credit or medical histories, P-Trak is relatively tame. Nonetheless, the recent spotlight on Lexis-Nexis made it clear that much personal information is unknowingly gathered and used. Several journalists reported checking personal information in P-Trak, and most found erroneous information. This raises another issue: what inaccurate personal information is floating around in cyberspace and what effect might that have? View full abstract»

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  • Distributed multimedia for a song

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 8 - 9
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Karaoke lets people sing along to recorded accompaniments. Many karaoke systems provide the accompaniment, on-screen vocal texts for the singer to follow, and a video that is appropriate to the selected song. There are currently three types of karaoke systems: those for karaoke houses, cable TV companies, and home use. These are all standalone systems that require considerable human interaction. None of them can provide Karaoke on demand. To provide KOD, Y.-J. Lee, D.H.C. Du, and W.-H. Ma (1996) have proposed Sesame (a scalable and extensible architecture for multimedia entertainment). They claim that Sesame is modular (system elements can be easily replaced), scalable, extensible, and cost effective. Although other researchers have devised KOD schemes, these schemes are also standalone systems, are limited by throughput, or only provide audio. Sesame system would have three basic components: the server system, the network, and the user workstations. The server system uses off the shelf products such as a Fast-Wide SCSI II channel to connect storage devices to servers. Servers, also using commodity products such as Intel Pentium or Motorola PowerPC chips, administer the data. A switch based network connects the server to the workstations. A switch based network can provide each user with a dedicated link and bandwidth at low latency, unlike a shared medium network such as a LAN. The workstation forwards user requests, decompresses the data, mixes the user's voice with the soundtrack, and controls the audio-video display. The system uses MPEG compression View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Periodical ceased production in 1996. The retitled version is 

IEEE Concurrency.

Full Aims & Scope