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Selected Areas in Communications, IEEE Journal on

Issue 4 • Date May 1988

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Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • On-line provisioning of network services

    Page(s): 662 - 668
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    The authors review the telecommunications service-provisioning process. They describe a view of future service provisioning and discuss the issues and technical problems involved in online service provisioning. They explore how intelligent network elements in conjunction with distributed algorithms and distributed databases can be used to achieve this objective. The authors also present and describe a system architecture for the implementation of online service provisioning View full abstract»

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  • The role of expert systems in switch maintenance operations and the generation of switch analysis requirements

    Page(s): 706 - 714
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    The use of expert systems technology to assist systems engineers in capturing, testing, and defining requirements for automation of switch fault diagnostic procedures is considered. A description is given of Bellcore-RTES (real-time expert systems), a prototype system that collects switch output messages, analyzes these messages for fault conditions using heuristic reasoning, and provides recommended corrective actions to maintenance operations personnel. The prototype has three functional modules that run concurrently and asynchronously. The switch interface module, which runs in real time, receives output messages from a digital switch. The user interface module, also running in real time, provides the operations technician with an interface to the system and the digital switch. The analysis module performs the expert analysis function: it reasons about messages and provides recommended actions to an operations technician. In the design and implementation of this module, one of the primary considerations was to achieve near-real-time performance View full abstract»

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  • A generic operations system interface to support the next generation of digital loop carrier systems

    Page(s): 677 - 684
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    The application of a generic interface between operations systems and microprocessor controlled network elements (OS/NE) to both universal and integrated DLC (digital loop carrier) systems is discussed. The high-level components of a DLC system are defined, and a generic interface between operations systems and their central office terminal of a microprocessor-controlled DLC system is described. The adaptation of the generic operations-systems interface to the DLC system for use with a generic interface between the local switching system and the remote digital terminal of an integrated DLC system is explored. Some issues associated with integrating a DLC system into a switching system are presented View full abstract»

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  • Surveillance strategies for a class of adaptive-routing algorithms in circuit-switched DNHR communications networks: a simulation study

    Page(s): 760 - 765
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    A large, circuit-switched, communications network engineered for historical traffic patterns using dynamic nonhierarchical routing (DNHR) is considered. During overloads, the offered traffic many not follow the historical patterns. In such situations, it is possible to increase network throughput by augmenting the routing tables in near-realtime to utilize instantaneous spare capacity. The surveillance strategy determines how often network data is collected and how frequently additional paths are added to the routing tables. Six surveillance strategies for adaptive routing are examined: (1) 2.5-min surveillance interval; (2) 5-min surveillance interval; (3) 10-min surveillance interval; (4) 15-min surveillance interval; (5) modify the routing every other 5 min; and (6) modify the routing every 5 min with a fixed 10-min lag before the routing tables are changed. Simulation is used to compare the network performance to the baseline performance without adaptive routing for each of the strategies. It is found that the more adaptive strategies, (1), (2), and (6), perform better during periods with variable traffic, and that the less adaptive strategies perform better during periods with stable traffic. During heavy overloads, almost as important as the surveillance strategy is the number of problems, overflowing node pairs, and the algorithm attempts to relieve View full abstract»

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  • Introduction of the International Network Management Center-Its activity and system

    Page(s): 751 - 759
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    The international network management center (INMC), which has been inaugurated for controlling international telephone and telex networks, is discussed. The functional activities of INMC are presented together with its philosophical background and definition. Attention is then focused on the main system for collecting and displaying network status and network performance data, the international network control system (INCS), which is also used to implement network management action. The possibilities for further technological innovations are briefly considered View full abstract»

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  • A generic integrated maintenance interface for network elements

    Page(s): 669 - 676
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    A generic interface specification that could be used as a common definition for maintenance functions is described. The process of developing the generic interface specification is presented, including the definition of supported functions, the description of the protocol and language used, and the detailed enumeration of the message specifications to support these functions. Generic interfaces can provide economic advantages in software development, training, and opportunities for simplification of human interfaces for remote interaction with the intelligent network element. The specific case examined is the set of messages that have been developed for system maintenance of network elements including digital loop carrier, digital terminal and cross-connect equipment, digital multiplexing and line-terminating equipment, digital switching equipment, common-channel signaling systems, supervisory systems, environmental monitors, and network timing elements View full abstract»

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  • Telecommunications management network (TMN) architecture and interworking designs

    Page(s): 685 - 696
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    The authors discuss data communications networks (DCNs) used by operating telephone companies to interconnect large numbers of telecommunications network elements with operations systems and workstations to support and manage telecommunications networks, referred to by the international telegraph and telephone consultative committee (CCITT) as a telecommunications management network (TMN). The TMNs can include different types of DCNs such as private lines, circuit-switched networks, packet-switched networks, and integrated services digital networks (ISDNs). These can be divided into two classes: connection-mode and connectionless-mode networks. The authors briefly consider TMN concepts and implementation architectures. They then focus on TMN internetworking design alternatives, issues, and protocol stacks, in order to provide data network designers and implementors with the necessary fundamentals in considering and choosing interworking solutions for TMN applications View full abstract»

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  • Statistical analysis of network traffic for class of service in packet-switched networks

    Page(s): 766 - 777
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    The goals of the class-of-service (COS) routing concept in packet-switched networks are to meet user requirements and to maximize network resource utilization. A statistical analysis model is proposed to analyze network traffic using all recorded data to determine what COSs are present and their associated bandwidth and delay requirements. The UNINET call-record database is used to demonstrate the COS concept. The experimental results show that the traffic patterns defined by COS exist. The bandwidth distribution for 300-b/s call is approximately normal. However, bandwidth distributions for calls equal to or greater than 1200 b/s are exponential, indicating that bandwidth is not a very predictable parameter for these speeds. Lower speeds tend to have a low input bandwidth and slightly higher output bandwidth View full abstract»

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  • Service provisioning data relationship model for ISDN network maintenance

    Page(s): 727 - 731
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    The question of what data are required to support troubleshooting of an ISDN and how they are to be organized is addressed. Data relationship models for organizing service-provisioning data to support network maintenance of the ISDN are proposed. The use of a hierarchical database model to support the primary rate interface is proposed but a relational database structure to support the basic rate interface is suggested View full abstract»

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  • Monitoring and analysis strategies for digital networks

    Page(s): 715 - 721
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    The telecommunications networks managed by the divested Bell operating companies (BOCs/IDCs) are rapidly evolving into digital networks. The authors discuss the major driving forces and characteristics that are shaping operations transition plans and formulate an operations strategy that is designed to position BOCs/IDCs to manage these digital networks. They describe a Bellcore prototype operations system, referred to as the network monitoring and analysis (NMA) system, that has been tested in one of the BOCs View full abstract»

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  • Implementation of a distributed architecture for intelligent network operations

    Page(s): 697 - 705
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    A plan for implementation of an integrated, distributed, architecture for support of intelligent network operations is described. The functional components are presented as generic building blocks, which can be combined in various ways to implement various services or specific network operations. The architecture permits flexible service offerings, allows enhanced service providers to access the local network, and allows a greater level of customer control. Transition from a traditional operations architecture to the distribution one is demonstrated View full abstract»

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  • A linear program model for the automation of network management

    Page(s): 742 - 750
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    A linear program model is developed to represent the problem of real-time control of traffic in an overloaded circuit-switched network. Circuit groups and exchanges are modeled approximately as saturating devices. Circuit groups saturate with respect to carried traffic, and exchanges saturate with respect to the rate of attempts served. A linear objective function is chosen. Methods for the size of the linear program model are introduced, and techniques for computing its solution are described. The solution of the linear program is in the form of quotas for all the streams of call attempts entering the network. Detailed call-by-call routing decisions are devolved to individual nodes or regional network management centers View full abstract»

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  • Operations planning strategies for new network services and technologies

    Page(s): 641 - 647
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    An approach for using computer-based operations systems not only to support new telecommunications technologies and services but to facilitate their introduction is described. This approach is considered beneficial to telephone companies for two reasons. First, operations processes can become increasingly automated, allowing manual procedures to be phased out. Second, operations need to become an integral part of new network technologies and services to help provide the advanced telecommunications services that customers are demanding. It is demonstrated that joint planning for services, technologies, networks, and operations in the early stages of a project can result in rapid, but orderly, evolution View full abstract»

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  • Network management-recent advances and future trends

    Page(s): 732 - 741
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    The author provides an introduction to and an overview of network management (NM). He traces some of its history, discusses some of its recent advances, and projects some future trends. He describes many of the NM advances in the 1970s and 1980s that were made possible by stored-program control and operations systems. He examines the evolution to integrated services digital networks (ISDNs) and intelligent networks using common-channel signaling as their backbone View full abstract»

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  • Operations planning for the information age [telecommunication networks]

    Page(s): 633 - 640
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    The need for integration of network and operations planning is discussed. A functional planning approach is suggested, and a current functional plan for near-term operations is presented. A functional approach to longer range operations is then discussed, starting with a list of desired attributes for the next-generation network. These attributes are analyzed with respect to the demands they make on architecture and operations functions View full abstract»

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  • Trends in the automation of service provisioning

    Page(s): 656 - 661
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    The elements of automated provisioning are identified as: computerized operations systems; real-time interfaces among systems; consistency among various databases; remotely controllable network elements; and maximum availability of in-place connections. The past, present, and future of the provisioning process are described. The main thrusts of increasing automation and expanding it to a wider scope of services include streamlined interfaces to the customer, capitalizing on network advances, and an integrated flow-through architecture. A key feature of the architecture is the controller function, which directs the automatic processing of a customer's service request View full abstract»

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  • Data communication network and database implementation strategy for a transmission network operations system

    Page(s): 722 - 726
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    The authors describe a basic concept for the configuration of an integrated transmission network operations system. They discuss the fundamental system components: a data communication network and a common database. Details of the implementation of these components are discussed with an example of a transmission network operation system View full abstract»

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  • Pacific Bell's network and systems concept of the 90s

    Page(s): 627 - 632
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    An overview is given of a concept developed by Pacific Bell of integrating the functionality of its service-carrying network and its operational support systems to serve its customers needs in the 1990s, economically and effectively. The concept is called network and systems concepts of the 90s, or Netsys, for short. The concept serves as a focal point for network systems and operations planners by providing a common conceptual reference from which strategies can be developed View full abstract»

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  • Integrated operations

    Page(s): 648 - 655
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    The value of and reasons for integrating operations systems (OSs) with each other and with network elements are discussed. The reasons for integrating current OSs are: to provide added value resulting from the synergy of capabilities implemented in each individual OS; to increase the flexibility of the overall system and the diversity of methods and organizational structures it can support; to ease the task of implementing, maintaining, and operations OSs themselves; and to foster competition and support a multivendor environment. Developments in the integration of OS in the Bell operating companies are examined View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications focuses on all telecommunications, including telephone, telegraphy, facsimile, and point-to-point television, by electromagnetic propagation.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Muriel Médard
MIT