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IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering

Issue 7 • Date Jul 1996

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
  • Where do operations come from? A multiparadigm specification technique

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):508 - 528
    Cited by:  Papers (11)  |  Patents (5)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1980 KB)

    Proposes a technique to help people organize and write complex specifications, exploiting the best features of several different specification languages. Z is supplemented, primarily with automata and grammars, to provide a rigorous and systematic mapping from input stimuli to convenient operations and arguments for the Z specification. Consistency analysis of the resulting specification is based ... View full abstract»

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  • Elements of style: analyzing a software design feature with a counterexample detector

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):484 - 495
    Cited by:  Papers (29)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1236 KB)

    Demonstrates how Nitpick, a specification checker, can be applied to the design of a style mechanism for a word processor. The design is cast, along with some expected properties, in a subset of Z. Nitpick checks a property by enumerating all possible cases within some finite bounds, displaying as a counterexample the first case for which the property fails to hold. Unlike animation or execution t... View full abstract»

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  • Using partial-order methods in the formal validation of industrial concurrent programs

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):496 - 507
    Cited by:  Papers (9)  |  Patents (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1344 KB)

    Formal validation is a powerful technique for automatically checking that a collection of communicating processes is free from concurrency-related errors. Although validation tools invariably find subtle errors that were missed during thorough simulation and testing, the brute-force search they perform can result in excessive memory usage and extremely long running times. Recently, a number of res... View full abstract»

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  • Timing analysis of Ada tasking programs

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):461 - 483
    Cited by:  Papers (18)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2196 KB)

    Concurrent real-time software is increasingly used in safety-critical embedded systems. Assuring the quality of such software requires the rigor of formal methods. In order to analyze a program formally, we must first construct a mathematical model of its behavior. In this paper, we consider the problem of constructing such models for concurrent real-time software. In particular, we provide a meth... View full abstract»

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  • Separate computation of alias information for reuse

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):442 - 460
    Cited by:  Papers (4)  |  Patents (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1752 KB)

    Interprocedural data flow information is useful for many software testing and analysis techniques, including data flow testing, regression testing, program slicing and impact analysis. For programs with aliases, these testing and analysis techniques can yield invalid results, unless the data flow information accounts for aliasing effects. Recent research provides algorithms for performing interpro... View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tse-eic@computer.org