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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 10 • Date Oct. 1996

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Potential starter/generator technology for future aerospace application

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 17 - 24
    Cited by:  Papers (19)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (873 KB)  

    This paper presents a search and comparative review of the literature available on variable speed constant frequency (VSCF) technologies. In particular, most of the progress made in the past ten years, using power electronics and electric machines for VSCF systems is reported. Two VSCF systems, based on induction and switched reluctance machine technologies, are presented. The research on the singly- and doubly-fed induction machines has focused on VSCF for wind power generation; whereas, that on switched reluctance machines has been directly studied as a VSCF technology in aircraft system. Results obtained so far favor the switched reluctance machine over the induction machine. Based on the foregoing comparative review, it is recommended that the induction machine be fully investigated as a VSCF drive in aircraft system. The findings should then be compared with the counterpart SRM system. Issues of comparison may include fault tolerance and redundancy, power density, torque requirements, overload ratings, temperature range and cooling, efficiency and stability over expected operating speed range. View full abstract»

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  • Electronically steerable plasma mirror based radar-concept and characteristics

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 38 - 44
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (822 KB)  

    An alternative to using a phased array to steer a radar beam is to electronically control the orientation of an inertialess broadband microwave reflector. Recent experiments have demonstrated that a planar plasma mirror immersed in a magnetic field can be formed with electron densities high enough to reflect X-band microwave beams. A plasma mirror performs like a metal mirror, but it is inertialess. Compared to high performance phased array systems, a plasma mirror based radar system is much simpler and is therefore more affordable. Electronic steering of microwave beams using a plasma mirror permits the use of wide instantaneous bandwidth waveforms. Potential areas of application for a plasma mirror based antenna system include ship self-defense, high-resolution radar imaging, target identification, electronic countermeasures, high data rate communications, spread spectrum links and remote sensing. As a reflector, the plasma mirror exhibits extremely low loss and the reflectivity is very nearly 100%. Since a perfectly reflecting object cannot radiate, the noise temperature contribution of the plasma mirror to the antenna temperature is likely to be small. The plasma sheet can be steered in elevation by tilting the magnetic field, and steering in azimuth may be accomplished by designating cathode initiation sites. Switching times between successive mirror orientations may be less than 20 μs. View full abstract»

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  • The ELDORA/ASTRAIA airborne Doppler weather radar: results from recent field tests

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 34 - 37
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1056 KB)  

    The ELDORA/ASTRAIA airborne Doppler weather radar was recently placed in service by US and French atmospheric sciences research laboratories. The ELDORA/ASTRAIA radar is designed to provide high resolution measurements of the air motion and rainfall characteristics of atmospheric storms which are too large, remote or fast-moving to be adequately observed by ground-based radars. This paper discusses the measurement requirements and the design goals of the radar and presents sample measurements from a recent weather research field program View full abstract»

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  • Surveillance through walls and other opaque materials

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 6 - 9
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (464 KB)  

    The Department of Defense (DoD) has funded a dazzling array of “high tech” solutions for many of the problems facing our military forces. Many of these “solutions” have been effective for long range mass destruction but have not been applicable for the close-in hand-to-hand combat that is on our streets. Our goal at the Hughes AET Center has been to convert “high tech” DoD capabilities into cost effective tools to help law enforcement agencies do their jobs better. Surveillance systems presently used by law enforcement officers make extensive use of television, infrared and other Line-of-Sight (LOS) surveillance systems. However, these systems cannot tell what is happening on the other side of a wall, behind bushes, around the corner, in the dark or through a dense fog. A new sensor has been developed that uses technology developed by the DoD for missile warhead fuzing. This small, light weight, low power “Radar” is based upon the fact that radio waves can penetrate nonmetallic materials. This new surveillance capability can help provide information about what is in a wall, ceiling or floor or on the other side of a door or concrete wall. Real field scenarios are used in this paper to show how this radar works and how field users can tell if someone is moving inside a building, even from remote locations View full abstract»

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  • MMW scanning antenna

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 29 - 33
    Cited by:  Papers (7)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (396 KB)  

    Cost reduction is one of the most important considerations in millimeter-wave (MMW) radar development. Hardware, especially the phase-shifters, for electronic beam scanning in the MMW band presents very complex fabrication challenges that dramatically raise the device cost. A typical mechanically-scanning antenna contains one or more hinged parts (lenses, mirrors or feeds). In operation they experience strong mechanical accelerations and other forces that sharply limit the scanning speed. We propose a solution to this problem, using a leaky-wave periodically loaded antenna design and a new architecture. This paper presents the basic design, and discusses related issues View full abstract»

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  • Adept, adapt, adopt: three hurdles for new products

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 3 - 5
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (280 KB)  

    New commercial products based on military technology face a series of hurdles as they progress from customer needs to final product. This article looks at three significant hurdles. How can the company become adept at the technology involved? Can they adapt the technology to market needs? Will the company adopt the new technology into it's culture? From the examples given, we see a need for adding a new product function between research, marketing, and manufacturing View full abstract»

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  • Developing the next generation cockpit display system

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 25 - 28
    Cited by:  Patents (33)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (396 KB)  

    The goal of advanced cockpit display systems is to present large amounts of information quickly and in an understandable format, enabling the aviator to improve mission performance. Current front-line cockpit display systems utilize low-resolution analog video to present two-dimensional (2-D) images on many separate displays. The future cockpit will be capable of integrating large picture digital video with three-dimensional (3-D) and 2-D color images. This system will be capable of rendering icons, maps, and world-views. It will be compatible with head mounted displays and multiple large displays to improve war-planning and combat aviator situational awareness. We are developing a massively parallel 3-D renderer which will be capable of updating 500,000 3-D triangles per second with shading, lighting, transparency, texture mapping, and hidden surface removal. The renderer design employs a massively parallel architecture with 1,024 ALUs per chip to display one million anti-aliased vectors per second. Current high end workstations are capable of these display goals, but fall far short of military reliability, size, and power requirements. The rendering system will be small enough to fit on one board, extensible to dual-seat configuration, and capable of up to eight windows per display channel View full abstract»

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  • Crew station measurement methodology: a quantitative approach

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 14 - 16
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (276 KB)  

    An investigation of the difficulties associated with analyzing the geometric constraints placed upon the human operator in a work setting was conducted. Many workstations, such as a cockpit, have limited data available for creating the CAD models required for human performance analysis. To create a model, a time-consuming, labor-intensive process of collecting measurement data by hand must be performed, resulting in a CAD model of questionable accuracy. In order to conduct accurate repeatable analysis, CAD data for all workstations must be collected quickly and in a standardized format. A demonstration project assessed the feasibility of using Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM) technology to collect workstation geometry and create a CAD Model. Baseline data for comparing hand collection methods was derived from previous aircraft cockpit CAD modeling projects. This method involved approximately two weeks for data collection alone and another week to create the CAD model. The CMM technology was determined to be a cost-effective method for creating CAD models of aircraft cockpits. This technology substantially reduced the time required to build a high fidelity CAD model while significantly improving the accuracy of the data View full abstract»

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  • High speed plastic networks (HSPN): a new technology for today's applications

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 10 - 13
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (400 KB)  

    Decades ago, glass fiber promised to be the future of communications offering large bandwidth, low attenuation, and electromagnetic compatibility. For the long haul applications, this promise has been fulfilled. Today, glass fibers have yielded simple, reliable, and economic means of communicating worldwide. However, when it comes to shorter distances and rugged environments, glass fiber optics has not been the answer. Unforeseen rapid developments in software and display technology have enabled communications in the form of multimedia, E-mail, web pages, and video conferencing. These developments are pushing data rates higher and higher in application environments that are more severe, uncontrolled and require shorter connected intensive links. To achieve desired data rates and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) using copper systems, shielded cable and connectors or parallel links are necessary, driving up cost and complexity. Glass fiber optic systems provide more than adequate bandwidth and superior EMC but cannot offer a cost effective, robust, user-friendly system. Recent developments have poised plastic optical fiber (POF) to fill the physical layer gap. This paper will discuss the recent developments in plastic fiber including appropriate application space, types of plastic optical fiber, ARPA-funded HSPN team, and recent POF developments View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

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Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Pace, PhD EE
Chief Engineer SenTech
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