Scheduled System Maintenance:
Some services will be unavailable Sunday, March 29th through Monday, March 30th. We apologize for the inconvenience.
By Topic

Education, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Aug. 1996

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 26
  • Preface to Special Issue on the Application of Information Technologies to Engineering and Science E

    Publication Year: 1996
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (162 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • A flexible graphical user interface for embedding heterogeneous neural network simulators

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 367 - 374
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2380 KB)  

    A graphical user interface (GUI) for heterogeneous neural network simulators proposed in this article is intended to be of use both for the novice and for the experienced neural network user. For the novice, it provides an easy-to-use neural network simulation package that insulates the user from the requirements of knowing the simulator implementation details or the configuration file syntax. For the experienced neural network professional it provides an interface that is easily extensible to include any additional neural network simulator in its binary form. To satisfy both academic and personal computer environments, the GUI has been developed by using the free TCL/TK software package, available on workstations running Unix and on PCs running the free Linux operating system. Although the GUI and the embedded simulators have been successfully tested both in neural network research and training programs, a more extensive testing in undergraduate and graduate level classes is in progress View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The need for a hypertext instructional design methodology

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 375 - 380
    Cited by:  Papers (13)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (524 KB)  

    Educators are showing an interest in media rich presentation systems as a means of giving additional material to a class or of showing concepts in a graphical fashion during class. Educators have concerns, however, about the length of time it takes to design and implement media rich or multimedia systems, about copyright issues, and whether the system will be used more than once. They also want to be able to design the system using sound instructional principles, but may not have any time for acquiring such specialized knowledge and, indeed, they probably did not take any education classes while working on their advanced degrees. To help educators and students design effective and instructionally sound systems quickly, a hypertext instructional design engineering process can be used to help them to concentrate on structuring their system and on monitoring design violations. The process includes a requirements stage, a specifications stage, an implementation stage, validation for each stage and evaluation of the resulting system. The products of these stages are developed with object-oriented techniques which will eventually result in a hypertext system for instructional usage View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Education via advanced technologies

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 436 - 443
    Cited by:  Papers (19)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (884 KB)  

    Advanced technologies like the World Wide Web offer interesting opportunities for improving higher education. A study done at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) focused on these matters and made several specific recommendations. Since this study was completed, a new center was established at MIT to coordinate and promote the use of advanced technologies in education, and a high-level council on educational technology was formed. After briefly peering into the future, this paper describes the study and the new center View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The making of the special issue on the application of information technologies to engineering and science education

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 450 - 451
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (152 KB)  

    This paper presents an overview of the special issue of the IEEE Transactions on Education which was an experimental team effort to try and address some of the difficulties in applying information technologies to the creation, review, dissemination, and archiving of multimedia-rich contributions in engineering and science education. The solicitation and review were done electronically using the World Wide Web (WWW) and a restricted access server. The dissemination of the contributions used WWW/CD-ROM technology as a practical means for the IEEE Education Society to electronically distribute and archive the multimedia material containing video, audio, graphics, and code View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • CircuitViz: a new method for visualizing the dynamic behavior of electric circuits

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 297 - 303
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (636 KB)  

    Visualizing the dynamic behavior of electric circuits constitutes an important part of the learning process for students studying circuits. Circuit variables (voltage, current, power, and stored energy) are traditionally displayed separately from the circuit schematic as a Cartesian plot, but advances in scientific visualization indicate that merging all relevant data into a single visualization object, or graphic metaphor, improves the viewer's ability to perceive global relationships and thereby enhances understanding of the system under study. CircuitViz places the two-dimensional circuit diagram into a three-dimensional coordinate system and displays the circuit variables directly on the circuit diagram along the third spatial variable, and the display is animated to show time-dependent behavior. The visual cues are motivated by mechanical analogies (primarily the water-flow analogy) so as to draw upon the student's existing knowledge base. Examples of first-order circuits are presented in the paper. Initial classroom tests indicate that CircuitViz can motivate discussions of circuit operation by effectively illustrating qualitative circuit behavior, and most students report that the technique improved their understanding of transient circuit behavior View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Advancing asynchronous distance education using high-speed networks

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 444 - 449
    Cited by:  Papers (12)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (572 KB)  

    The Center for Telecommunications at Stanford University, in partnership with the Stanford Center for Professional Development, has designed and deployed an experimental system for delivery of Stanford courses in multimedia format to distance learners using the Internet as well as two experimental, asychronous transfer mode (ATM)-based, high-speed network testbeds. This configuration is designed to prototype the emerging broadband communications infrastructure in the United States and elsewhere. The courses are stored on servers and made available to distance learners on-demand. The user interface is implemented on the World Wide Web. Issues of systems integration, educational effectiveness, and economics are under study as part of the project, called ADEPT (Asynchronous Distance Education ProjecT). In this paper, ADEPT is described along with its experience to date View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • NSF workshop on information technology and undergraduate science, mathematics, engineering, and technology education: challenges and opportunities

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 452 - 454
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (356 KB)  

    Activities at a recent NSF-sponsored workshop are described in this note. Background information and motivation for the workshop are discussed, along with a description of its organization. Initial observations from the workshop are reported, and areas of leadership with respect to the use of information technology in undergraduate science, mathematics, engineering, and technology education are identified View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Teaching in a computer classroom with a hyperlinked, interactive book

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 327 - 335
    Cited by:  Papers (15)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (900 KB)  

    A first course in digital signal processing is being taught with an interactive book in a computer classroom. The interactive book is a set of Mathcad documents bound with navigation, full text search, annotation, and special pasting facilities. The documents consist of editable and active text and graphical and mathematical regions. The computer classroom has 20 student PC workstations, 40 seats, an instructor's podium with PC workstation, and lighting and projection (computer screen, overhead, and video) controls. Discussed are the choices of software, interactive book, computer classroom, teaching methods, student evaluations, and future plans View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Integrating academic services in a modern networked environment

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 409 - 414
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (968 KB)  

    Developments within the World Wide Web (WWW) and attendant user interfaces (e.g., Mosaic, Netscape) have produced well-defined protocols for describing, communicating, and viewing hypertext information. This ability to uniformly handle different types of information has created tremendous opportunities for re-engineering the means by which disparate data is managed and communicated among individuals and organizations. In the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) at the Georgia Institute of Technology, this technology is being used as the building block for integrating administrative, instructional, and research services. This paper describes tools, applications, experiences, and observations surrounding the development of the ECE Web Server View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Criteria for peer-review of engineering courseware on the NEEDS database

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 381 - 387
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (732 KB)  

    An electronic database of engineering educational courseware, called the National Engineering Education Delivery System (NEEDS), has been developed by the SYNTHESIS Coalition. Engineering courseware is computer-based educational material that can be used to assist engineering students in their learning process and assist instructors in their pedagogy. Courseware on NEEDS, as with any textbook or journal publication, requires review to assure quality. To implement this review, we first examined existing schemes that evaluated courseware and then developed our own. We will implement a peer-review system that results in a three-tiered ranking of courseware on the NEEDS database: nonreviewed material, endorsed courseware, and premier courseware. Endorsed courseware will be peer reviewed to establish that the courseware has correct technical content, is easy to use, and is potentially useful to instructors other than the author. To accomplish this in a straightforward manner, we are going to implement a two-page peer-review form that provides a “gestalt” review of the courseware. To also recognize the exceptionally high quality pieces of courseware that will be on the NEEDS database, we will implement an annual award for “premier” courseware that will require greater documentation of enhanced learning and recommended pedagogical application. We are confident that once a peer-review process is implemented, the NEEDS database will gain credibility as a source of courseware that is complete, technically reliable, and aesthetically appealing View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A computer-aided, total quality approach to manufacturing education in engineering

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 415 - 422
    Cited by:  Papers (22)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (948 KB)  

    This paper describes an ongoing study in improving entry-level engineering education through the deployment of new teaching and learning tools. We introduce a computer-aided interactive multimedia manufacturing courseware. To improve manufacturing education we need to change not only the process of teaching and learning, but also provide new tools and technology that promote efficient learning and make it widely available and continuously improving. To address this manufacturing education challenge, we are presently designing a program based on a new computer-aided education paradigm that embodies total quality management (TQM) and critical thinking (CT) concepts. An interactive multimedia manufacturing courseware lies at the heart of this new computer-aided education paradigm. The manufacturing engineering multimedia courseware (MEMC) includes: on-line lectures, audiovideo education tools, interactive computer software, on-line assignment and exams, information about faculty, and on-line evaluation tools to obtain users' feedback to enhance teaching. It also makes access available to related academia, industry, and government research and education information through the World Wide Web. In this paper, we briefly review the status of engineering education in the United States and describe the appropriateness of unifying the concepts of TQM and CT. Additionally, we provide details of how these concepts can be used in an educational model View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A multimedia manual on the World Wide Web for telecommunications equipment

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 342 - 348
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1580 KB)  

    An interactive multimedia educational manual on the Internet through the World Wide Web for commercial optical fiber telecommunications equipment is described. The Telecommunications Laboratory Manual is a vehicle for enhancing engineering education with realistic laboratory or virtual laboratory experience. The manual provides a brief system tutorial, operating instructions, online help, and multimedia experimental demonstrations. It incorporates block diagrams, photographic images, and hypertext links that are mouse clickable, allowing users to access documents or links describing components or processes in any order. An experimental section guides students through laboratory experiences, demonstrates selected equipment characteristics, and provides for direct instructor contact through e-mail. Other remote resources on the Internet are linked to create a global multimedia library. This paper describes the manual, its multimedia design, its use in the curriculum, and its further potential View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Instrumentation and communication modules on CD-ROMs for enriching engineering education

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 304 - 308
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (716 KB)  

    In response to the challenges facing engineering educators today, the latest developments in computer technology were applied to instrumentation and communication, two essential areas of the engineering curricula. Hypermedia-based resource modules containing generic information on these two areas were developed. Users can navigate the modules using either a networked tree or direct access method. This allows students to learn independently, at their own pace, and in a nonlinear way. The resource modules can be used in measurements and technical communication courses, in almost all engineering laboratories, and in capstone design projects. Since the resource modules contain generic information and are put on CD-ROMs, they can be used in other engineering programs. Preliminary results indicate that the modules were informative and helpful to students and also allowed them to learn material independently and at their own pace View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The making of multimedia power systems control and simulation labware

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 314 - 319
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (984 KB)  

    This paper discusses the development of a multimedia, PC-based, hydro-electric power generation system simulator to interface, via real-time data acquisition and control, to programmable logic controllers. The project is ongoing. The paper discusses the simulator design and operational modes. It also discusses lessons learned in this rapidly evolving area of advanced instructional technology. A World Wide Web page was created that contains additional material showing the user interface View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Developing and implementing interactive multimedia in education

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 430 - 435
    Cited by:  Papers (12)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (608 KB)  

    This paper presents first hand experience with the development and implementation of interactive multimedia instructional materials for an engineering economy course attended by 1000 engineering students over three years at Virginia Tech. The interactive software was developed from a National Science Foundation grant aimed at enhancing the undergraduate engineering curriculum through increased emphasis on design and economic principles. The purpose of this paper is to describe the type of multimedia instructional materials that were developed, how they were implemented, and, finally, to present an evaluation of the results from a survey in which the benefits of multimedia-based support materials were assessed View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A virtual classroom approach to teaching circuit analysis

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 287 - 296
    Cited by:  Papers (30)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (860 KB)  

    We have implemented several innovative uses of computers and computer networks to develop a new pedagogy for the delivery of university engineering courses. These uses of computers and networks are creating efficiencies in the learning process, and students have found this interactive learning environment to be a significant improvement upon a traditional engineering course. Student performance and retention, as well as faculty productivity, are increased in this innovative teaching and learning environment View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A new approach to interactive tutorial software for engineering education

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 399 - 408
    Cited by:  Papers (16)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1528 KB)  

    The experimental tutorial software described in this paper is designed specifically for engineering education at the university level, and it is significantly different in purpose and structure from other educational software. Its goal is to help students understand, visualize, and connect basic concepts. It is not a design tool or a wealth of hyperlinked text or an infinite source of drill problems. It is intended to be a dynamic and flexible resource for instructors as well as students and to be used by groups as well as individuals. It takes advantage of currently available high-resolution graphics capability to go beyond what can reasonably be expected of textbooks or computer systems with small low-resolution displays. Since the software is written as an X Windows Motif application, it achieves a wide degree of platform independence for workstations and PCs. In addition, the tutorial set can be distributed without license fees or additional software acquisition costs for the user View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Experiencing CORAL: design and implementation of distant cooperative learning

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 357 - 366
    Cited by:  Papers (18)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2304 KB)  

    This paper describes application of information technologies to education, outlines the educational foundations and design strategies of the applications, and addresses related research issues. In this paper, the authors introduce the CORAL (COoperative Remotely Accessible Learning) system, currently under development at National Chiao Tung University in Taiwan, as an example of how information technologies are being used in science and engineering education View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Using multimedia to teach the theory of digital multimedia signals

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 336 - 341
    Cited by:  Papers (15)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1096 KB)  

    A new digital signal processing (DSP) course designed to build students' intuition about signals and systems is presented. The course makes extensive use of multimedia demonstrations to relate real-world signals and discrete-time systems to their mathematical descriptions. In addition to the numerous in-class demonstrations, weekly laboratory exercises have been developed to further strengthen the ties between DSP theory and real-world signals and systems. Many of the in-class demonstrations have been captured on the World Wide Web (WWW), so the students can explore them outside of class. In the near future, the WWW-based demonstrations will be packaged on a CD-ROM as an integral part of a new text View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Design and implementation of an electronics laboratory simulator

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 309 - 313
    Cited by:  Papers (20)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (464 KB)  

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a computer-simulated laboratory for use in undergraduate engineering education. The simulated laboratory is implemented in a Windows environment. Several forms of tutorials and other assistance are available to the user to complete the laboratory. Evaluations indicate that when the simulation is used with class lectures, there is a significant improvement in both theory and lab knowledge. Use of the simulation significantly cuts subsequent time and requests for assistance in the physical lab View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Implementation issues in SIMPLE learning environments

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 423 - 429
    Cited by:  Papers (4)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (564 KB)  

    SIMPLE makes it easier to construct and implement intensely interactive computer simulated learning environments. For construction of the environments, the primary strategy is to combine existing software components rather than to write new ones. Because SIMPLE is built on a powerful relational database engine, authors can structure and modify SIMPLE learning environments without writing programs or control scripts. The feature set of SIMPLE is not fixed, however, but is readily extensible. SIMPLE includes provisions for the construction and implementation of context sensitive help for learners. Automatic answer checking and configuration management make practical implementation of interactive learning environments easier for instructors. SIMPLE includes tools for automatically logging learners' activities and for processing the recorded information to make it useful to the instructor. SIMPLE runs on Microsoft Windows machines and is available at no cost for educational use View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Splice: an analytical network analysis software

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 394 - 398
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (580 KB)  

    Splice is a symbolic circuit analysis program that operates under the Windows operating system. At the present time, Splice is the only commercially available software that will perform this type of analysis. A description of the features found in Splice 1.0 and examples to illustrate them is presented. Splice works with The Design Center circuit simulator available from the MicroSim Corporation. The user adds special “analysis symbols” to the circuit schematic that instructs Splice to perform a specific type of analysis. The analysis symbols are transparent to PSpice, giving the user the option to simulate the network at any time. Splice is powered internally by the Waterloo Maple Software algebraic engine and will analyze many types of linear and linearized electrical networks consisting of inductors (with initial conditions), capacitors (with initial conditions), resistors, transformers, transistors (bipolar and field-effect), operational amplifiers, and all types of AC and DC (independent and dependent) current and voltage sources. Splice will perform branch current, nodal voltage, Thevenin reduction, transfer function, and two-port reduction analysis with options for component substitutions (both numeric and/or symbolic including zero and infinity), pole and zero calculations, sinusoidal steady-state analysis, and time domain result calculations. Potential classroom applications of Splice 1.0, as well as future enhancements of the software, are presented and discussed View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Group decision support system for assessment of problem-based learning

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 388 - 393
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (556 KB)  

    Assessment is an important task in problem-based learning (PBL). It has a strong influence on students' approaches to learning and their outcomes. In order to provide an open and fair method of PBL assessment, a group decision support system (GDSS) has been developed. The system uses mathematical decision methods for collecting assessment criteria and their appropriate weights, and databases for storing students' details and data on the assessment criteria. It integrates databases with model bases in a cooperative decision-making environment and is implemented on a client-server platform using a relational database management system. The GDSS has been developed and used to improve the efficiency and quality of assessing students' PBL outcomes View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Developing multimedia training materials for use with small robot controls at Chubu Polytechnic Center in Japan

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 349 - 356
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (744 KB)  

    This paper discusses the development of a multimedia training material for use at a high-level public vocational training center, run by the Employment Promotion Corporation (EPC) in Japan, and reports on the educational merits of this material. The instructional material was developed to assist trainees in acquiring programming skills needed for small robot control. It allows self-paced learning in a laboratory situation by means of multimedia audio and visual information and is much more effective than the sole use of conventional textbooks in helping people working in the technical fields to understand robot motions and their control methods. This system differs in that self-paced learning is introduced mainly to facilitate and improve the quality of the communication between the instructor and students. The response of those attending the seminar using this material shows that this course has succeeded in this goal. The material's use results in increased trainee motivation, leading to enhanced learning, and suggests one direction in multimedia practices for engineering education View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

Educational research, methods, materials, programs, and technology in electrical engineering, computer engineering, and fields within the scope of interest of IEEE.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Jeffrey E. Froyd
Texas A&M University