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Computational Science & Engineering, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date Fall 1996

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Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • Response to Wilson: A Week Won't Do It

    Publication Year: 1996
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  • Response to Wilson: Forget Multiple Tools; Use Mathematica

    Publication Year: 1996
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  • Real CSE Problems from Industry

    Publication Year: 1996
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  • A Multigrid Tutorial with Applications to Molecular Dynamics

    Publication Year: 1996
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  • 1996 ACES Conference

    Publication Year: 1996
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • ILAY Workshop on Iterative Methods

    Publication Year: 1996
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Reciprocity in High-Performance Trade

    Publication Year: 1996
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  • Adifor 2.0: automatic differentiation of Fortran 77 programs

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 18 - 32
    Cited by:  Papers (91)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3272 KB)  

    Numerical codes that calculate not only a result, but also the derivatives of the variables with respect to each other, facilitate sensitivity analysis, inverse problem solving, and optimization. The paper considers how Adifor 2.0, which won the 1995 Wilkinson Prize for Numerical Software, can automatically differentiate complicated Fortran code much faster than a programmer can do it by hand. The Adifor system has three main components: the AdiFor preprocessor, the ADIntrinsics exception-handling system, and the SparsLinC library View full abstract»

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  • Modernizing high-performance computing for the military

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 71 - 74
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    The High Performance Computing Modernization Program is the major force improving the Department of Defense's ability to exploit computation to sustain technological superiority. In a technology area critical to maintaining military and national leadership, it continues a 50-year legacy of investment on into the next century. As advanced weapons have become readily available to any country with the resources to buy them on the open market, US national defense demands that we stay a step ahead in weapons design and performance. A solid and continuing investment in high-performance computing will help ensure that we can do so View full abstract»

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  • Programming without bothering about data structures?

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 67 - 68
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    It is sound programming practice to define the data structures to be computed on before the actual programming effort starts. Actually, this step is crucial to obtaining efficient and portable code. Parallel codes, and more specifically computational science and engineering codes, are no exception to this rule. On the other hand, it is also well known that specific data structure selections can prevent compiler analysis and thereby prohibit program optimization. This problem is best illustrated by the representation of a sparse code in either Fortran with indirect addressing, or in another language with pointer structures. In this situation software maintenance and the effort of producing sparse computation codes become complicated, and most compiler optimizations get disabled. The paper considers how these two opposing interests can be expected to increase in importance for computational science and engineering. Especially in CSE, the need for high performance will push programmers to use more advanced data structures, and optimizing compiler technology will also be stressed more and more View full abstract»

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  • Computational fluid dynamics at CRS4, Italy

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 4 - 8
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
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    Numerical simulation of fluid flow for a variety of practical applications is a major activity of the Computational Mechanics Group of CRS4 (Center for Advanced Studies, Research and Development). CRS4 develops computer simulation techniques to solve problems in applied science and engineering. The Computational Mechanics Group's work includes codes for CFD applications on parallel computers. The paper describes a selection of their projects, including: aerodynamic flow, coastal circulation and oil recovery processes View full abstract»

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  • A parallel cellular tool for interactive modeling and simulation

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 33 - 43
    Cited by:  Papers (22)
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    The paper discusses Camel, an interactive parallel programming environment based on cellular automata. With Camel users can develop high-performance applications in science and engineering. Examples in geology, traffic planning, image processing, and genetic algorithms show its usefulness View full abstract»

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  • What should computer scientists teach to physical scientists and engineers? 2. Response to Wilson: teach computing in context

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 54 - 62
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    For pt.1 see ibid., p.46 (1996). Greg Wilson started a discussion on what topics computer scientists should teach-given just a week-that would most benefit the physical scientist or engineer. The present paper provides three more opinions, and Wilson's response View full abstract»

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  • Students get hands-on research experience at SDSC

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 13 - 16
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    Since its inception in 1985, the San Diego Supercomputer Center and its researchers have promoted programs of educational outreach to students and educators at K-12, undergraduate, and graduate levels. The goals are to make computational science more accessible by demonstrating how it functions as a research tool in various disciplines, and to encourage achievement of academic and professional goals. This article highlights the experiences of participants from three SDSC educational outreach programs View full abstract»

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  • Inside parallel computers: trends in interconnection networks

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 69 - 71
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (340 KB)  

    Computational scientists who depend on parallel computing to let them run larger models in less time will be disappointed unless the processors can pass information back and forth quickly. The interconnection networks through which processors communicate in tightly-coupled parallel machines thus remain a vital research topic for computer architects. Over the last two decades, we have seen an evolution in the demands placed on these networks. Early SIMD machines required the simultaneous transfer of data from each network input to each output for a relatively small set of communication configurations or permutations; whereas the SIMD and MIMD machines of today need to support varied patterns of synchronous and asynchronous traffic, respectively. Interconnection networks can be categorized according to a number of criteria such as topology, routing strategy and switching technique. They vary widely in their cost, fault tolerance, simplicity, amenability to partitioning, and their aggregate bandwidth for local and nonlocal traffic patterns View full abstract»

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  • Making connections [graph theory]

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 9 - 12
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    One of the problems that occurs repeatedly in scientific computing is deciding whether an object is connected or disconnected. It happens that this question is related to finding a spanning tree for a graph. In other words, if you have a set of points with connections between some pairs of them, you would like the least number of connections that still keeps the set connected. You can find this minimum spanning tree with a method called depth first search, among other ways. The paper addresses the question of determining connected components View full abstract»

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  • From scientific software libraries to problem-solving environments

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 44 - 53
    Cited by:  Papers (33)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1712 KB)  

    As more scientists and engineers adopt computation as a primary tool, they will want more problem-solving help from easy-to-use, comprehensive software systems. A workshop discussed the long path to this vision of scientific software's future, and the roadblocks in the way. In order to understand the findings of the workshop, the paper presents some background on software libraries and problem solving environments View full abstract»

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  • High-performance languages for parallel computing

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 63 - 65
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    The continued demand for increased computing power led in the mid 1980s to the development of highly parallel scalable multiprocessing systems. Such machines can be built at reasonable cost, and they are potentially scalable to large numbers of processors. Fully exploiting their power, however, is difficult. The paper discusses some high performance languages for parallel computing, including High Performance Fortran, Vienna Fortran and Fortran D View full abstract»

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  • Outline of a roadmap for compiler technology

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 65 - 66
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    Compiler technology has been a major subfield of computer science ever since the first compilers were developed in the late 1950s. Compilers made possible the development of today's efficient and sophisticated software at an affordable cost, thus playing a crucial role in popularizing computers. Though we have learned much over 40 years about compiler development tools, internal compiler organization, parsing techniques, and optimization algorithms, sustained progress in computer usability and performance will require much more research in this area. The paper discusses a few important challenges in compiler technology View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Periodical ceased publication in 1998. The current retitled publication is IEEE Computing in Science and Engineering.

Full Aims & Scope