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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 8 • Date Aug. 1996

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
  • Reference Model for Smooth Growth of Software Systems(003)5402022

    Publication Year: 1996
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (224 KB)  

    This note presents a model of smooth software system evolution. The model assumes constant effort per release and takes into account the growth of system complexity View full abstract»

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  • An economic model to estimate software rewriting and replacement times

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 580 - 598
    Cited by:  Papers (15)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1808 KB)  

    The effort required to service maintenance requests on a software system increases as the software system ages and deteriorates. Thus, it may be economical to replace an aged software system with a freshly written one to contain the escalating cost of maintenance. We develop a normative model of software maintenance and replacement effort that enables us to study the optimal policies for software replacement. Based on both analytical and simulation solutions, we determine the timings of software rewriting and replacement, and hence the schedule of rewriting, as well as the size of the rewriting team as functions of the: user environment, effectiveness of rewriting, technology platform, development quality, software familiarity, and maintenance quality of the existing and the new software systems. Among other things, we show that a volatile user environment often leads to a delayed rewriting and an early replacement (i.e., a compressed development schedule). On the other hand, a greater familiarity with either the existing or the new software system allows for a less-compressed development schedule. In addition, we also show that potential savings from rewriting will be higher if the new software system is developed with a superior technology platform, if programmers' familiarity with the new software system is greater, and if the software system is rewritten with a higher initial quality View full abstract»

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  • Evaluating the mediator method: Prism as a case study

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 563 - 579
    Cited by:  Papers (17)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2284 KB)  

    A software engineer's confidence in the profitability of a novel design technique depends to a significant degree on previous demonstrations of its profitability in practice. Trials of proposed techniques are thus of considerable value in providing factual bases for evaluation. We present our experience with a previously presented design approach as a basis for evaluating its promise and problems. Specifically, we report on our use of the mediator method to reconcile tight behavioral integration with ease of development and evolution of Prism, a system for planning radiation treatments for cancer patients. Prism is now in routine clinical use in several major research hospitals. Our work supports two claims. In comparison to more common design techniques, the mediator approach eases the development and evolution of integrated systems; and the method can be learned and used profitably by practising software engineers View full abstract»

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  • Analyzing regression test selection techniques

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 529 - 551
    Cited by:  Papers (156)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3056 KB)  

    Regression testing is a necessary but expensive maintenance activity aimed at showing that code has not been adversely affected by changes. Regression test selection techniques reuse tests from an existing test suite to test a modified program. Many regression test selection techniques have been proposed, however, it is difficult to compare and evaluate these techniques because they have different goals. This paper outlines the issues relevant to regression test selection techniques, and uses these issues as the basis for a framework within which to evaluate the techniques. The paper illustrates the application of the framework by using it to evaluate existing regression test selection techniques. The evaluation reveals the strengths and weaknesses of existing techniques, and highlights some problems that future work in this area should address View full abstract»

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  • Theory of fault-based predicate testing for computer programs

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 552 - 562
    Cited by:  Papers (34)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1124 KB)  

    Predicates appear in both the specification and implementation of a program. One approach to software testing, referred to as predicate testing, is to require certain types of tests for a predicate. In this paper, three fault-based testing criteria are defined for compound predicates, which are predicates with one or more AND/OR operators. BOR (boolean operator) testing requires a set of tests to guarantee the detection of (single or multiple) boolean operator faults, including incorrect AND/OR operators and missing/extra NOT operators. BRO (boolean and relational operator) testing requires a set of tests to guarantee the detection of boolean operator faults and relational operator faults (i.e., incorrect relational operators). BRE (boolean and relational expression) testing requires a set of tests to guarantee the detection of boolean operator faults, relational operator faults, and a type of fault involving arithmetical expressions. It is shown that for a compound predicate with n, n>0, AND/OR operators, at most n+2 constraints are needed for BOR testing and at most 2*n+3 constraints for BRO or BRE testing, where each constraint specifies a restriction on the value of each boolean variable or relational expression in the predicate. Algorithms for generating a minimum set of constraints for BOR, BRO, and BRE testing of a compound predicate are given, and the feasibility problem for the generated constraints is discussed. For boolean expressions that contain multiple occurrences of some boolean variables, how to combine BOR testing with the meaningful impact strategy (Weyuker et al., 1994) is described View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org