By Topic

Computer

Issue 9 • Date Sept. 1996

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • IEEE Computer Society Election

    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1440 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE president-elect candidates address issues of concern to the Computer Society

    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (542 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Test Technology Technical Committee

    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (529 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Will tiny beans conquer the world again? [Java language]

    Page(s): 13 - 14
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (348 KB)  

    The paper discusses the Java language and its component technology Java Beans. Java Beans allows middleware to work across all desktops. Thus, it has a slight chance against ActiveX. ActiveX compiles into Wintel binaries, while Java compiles into J-code. Microsoft is about to apply some pressure by flooding the Internet with compelling applications that require users to adopt ActiveX View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Evolving an operating system for the Web

    Page(s): 90 - 92
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (356 KB)  

    Considering the drive to standardize operating system technology and the frantic pace of innovative application development on the Internet and World Wide Web, what is left for OS developers to do? The paper discusses some of the basic functions of operating systems and considers the development of a Web-oriented OS View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The effect of object-oriented frameworks on developer productivity

    Page(s): 45 - 51
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1024 KB)  

    Cost and time estimation are difficult problems in software development projects. Software metrics tackle this problem by assuming a statistical correlation between the size of a software project and the amount of effort typically required to realize it. To be useful in estimating cost, a size metric must take into account the inherent complexity of the system. Such metrics have been applied with varying degrees of success, but the nature of software development has been changing, and some of the assumptions behind the established cost-estimation techniques are slowly being invalidated. The System Meter (SM) is a new software sizing approach based on the notion of system description. System descriptions encompass all kinds of software artifacts, from requirement documents to final code. For each kind or level of artifacts, there is a corresponding flavor of SM. In our studies we used the first operational flavor, the SM at the preliminary analysis level, or Pre-SM. In contrast to the well-known Function Point (FP) metric, which is measurable after the more detailed but costly phase of domain analysis only, the SM explicitly takes OO concepts into account. It also distinguishes between components to be developed and those to be reused, thus reflecting the idea of incremental functionality. We present results of a field study of 36 projects developed using object technology. We measured both FP and the Pre-SM method in all 36 projects and compared their correlation to the development effort View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Managing the US Navy's first OO digital mapping project

    Page(s): 69 - 74
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (684 KB)  

    In the late 1980s the Defense Mapping Agency began converting their paper maps into digital format. A military standard known as Vector Product Format emerged as the format for storing digital vector data. The VPF relational data model, however, has problems representing complex spatial data. In 1991, the US Navy, a DMA database user, began investigating how object technology could improve its digital maps. This research led to the development of the Object Vector Product Format, an object-oriented approach to viewing and editing digital maps and charts. By combining multiple relational databases into a single OO database, OVPF offers users such key advantages as the ability to immediately update and modify the content of the original data. Over the course of developing OVPF we have also learned some valuable lessons about managing OO projects. Our experiences have given us insight into some important risk-management techniques, including how to manage the expectations of decision-makers and sponsors and how to implement effective training methods. Managing the OVPF project was much more rewarding than most due to the greatly increased productivity offered by an OO approach View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Reversibility in software engineering

    Page(s): 93 - 95
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (828 KB)  

    Part of the attraction of object technology is its ability to remove or lower the walls that have traditionally stood between various aspects of software construction-analysis, design, implementation, maintenance. A good OO process should be reversible, allowing developers to move between tasks backward as well as forward, with many benefits for the quality of the process and the product. The author explains the concept View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An OO project management strategy

    Page(s): 33 - 38
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (764 KB)  

    Large object oriented projects pose coordination, logistical, and communication problems for managers. We have developed a strategy designed to help solve these problems. Our strategy calls for an iterative development process. In addition, we call for specialized work teams and the division of projects into strategic and tactical areas. Strategic processes address issues that have system-wide ramifications, such as system architecture. The strategic work is divided into setup, architecture definition, and development phases. Tactical processes address day-to-day activities, such as software design and testing. Dividing a project this way for organization and management purposes allows strategic and tactical issues to be addressed in a more focused and effective manner View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Managing object oriented framework reuse

    Page(s): 52 - 61
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1672 KB)  

    Reusing frameworks instead of libraries can cause subtle architectural changes in an application, calling for innovative management solutions. We relate our experience in managing the Knowledge-Based Software Assistant project and offer tips for buying, building and using frameworks. One of the promises of object-oriented software development is that organizations can get a significant return on development investment because the code is easier to reuse. Software project managers are often eager to take the OO plunge for that reason, but are uncertain about the management issues they will face. There is also the problem of choosing the best form of reuse. Library-based reuse, the traditional reuse form, is more popular than framework-based reuse, but we have found that framework-based reuse offers many more benefits with the right management approach. We describe the lessons we learned when building the Knowledge-Based Software Assistant/Advanced Development Model View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Invention documentation: a primer

    Page(s): 85 - 86
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (196 KB)  

    The paper discusses the importance of maintaining adequate records during the development of an invention. Thorough and accurate records will help to track progress, determine the best course for future work, write reports, and develop papers for publication. From a legal perspective, it is important to keep records to patent an invention. To be patentable, an invention must be new, useful, and not an obvious or routine modification of a prior invention. Court cases have determined that computer programming, if recorded on a machine readable medium (such as a floppy disk), or inventions involving programmed computers can be patented View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Traceability process for large OO projects

    Page(s): 63 - 68
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (788 KB)  

    Object-oriented software development has become popular, but scaling it up for large projects has been a problem. With large OO projects, late integration problems are a particular concern. They can cause schedule slippage and other difficulties. I developed a process called Traceability for OO Quality Engineering, or TOOQE, to minimize such problems. TOOQE emphasizes traceability and the integration of development and testing to achieve quality and maintainability. TOOQE features an iterative design process that lets developers correct mistakes and learn more about the problem they are trying to solve as they go along. Each iteration includes requirements capture, analysis, design, coding, and testing. In other words, each is a mini-life cycle View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Managing iteration in OO projects

    Page(s): 39 - 43
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (868 KB)  

    Why do some companies succeed in managing object-oriented projects and others fail? I have reviewed numerous failed object technology projects, and it is clear to me that the single largest failure is technology management, not the technology itself. When they move to object technology, most companies prepare their technical staff by sending them to language and object-oriented analysis and design classes. Unfortunately, these same companies often ignore the training needs of the managers who will be directing the technical staff. Managers are left to fend for themselves, armed with yesterday's tools and with little insight into the potential of today's technology. I describe several project management issues facing companies switching to object technology and offer ways for managers to cope View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes highly acclaimed peer-reviewed articles written for and by professionals representing the full spectrum of computing technology from hardware to software and from current research to new applications.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Ron Vetter
University of North Carolina
Wilmington