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Personal Communications, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date Aug. 1996

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • Wireless ATM

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  • Wireless ATM: a perspective on issues and prospects

    Page(s): 8 - 17
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    In this article the author examines several key issues in wireless ATM and even offers possible resolutions for some. The primary differences that distinguish wireless from wireline communications are presented, together with a short summary of so-called second-generation digital cellular system concepts. The operation of a wireline ATM network, especially with regard to those aspects bearing on the feasibility of wireless extension, is briefly reviewed, as well as some key technologies which may be very important enablers for wireless ATM, and some possible approaches for enabling bandwidth on demand (the media access problem) and maintaining service quality guarantees (the cell handoff problem), respectively. Finally, a possible format for signaling and synchronization, needed to “tie it all together”, is presented View full abstract»

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  • Wireless ATM networks: architecture, system design and prototyping

    Page(s): 42 - 49
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    The concept of “wireless ATM”, first proposed in 1992, is now being actively considered as a potential framework for next-generation wireless communication networks capable of supporting integrated, quality-of-service (QoS) based multimedia services. We outline the technological rationale for wireless ATM, present a system-level reference architecture, discuss key subsystem design issues, and summarize early prototyping results for a proof-of-concept system called “WATMnet”. The reference architecture for wireless ATM consists of two major components: (a) a “radio access layer” for extension of ATM services over a wireless medium and (b) a “mobile ATM” infrastructure network capable of supporting terminal migration. Design considerations for both the radio access layer (e.g. physical layer, medium access control and data link control) and mobile ATM (e.g. handoff control, location management and routing/QoS control) are discussed, and key technical issues are identified in each case. An overview of experiences with the “WATMnet” system prototype developed at NEC USA's C&C Research Laboratories is given in conclusion View full abstract»

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  • Wireless ATM: limits, challenges, and proposals

    Page(s): 18 - 34
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    There has been an increased interest in the topic of “wireless ATM”. The subject matter raises interest due to the potential combination of two of the hottest topics in communications of the mid-1990s, but at the same time raises a natural question as to its viability, and sometimes even its desirability. In this article the authors survey potential applications of wireless ATM and describe what is usually meant by wireless ATM, why it may make sense, and some of the proposals to build systems based on it. The emphasis in this article is on the physical layer, the data link layer, and the access layer. The authors also present general observations on each of these layers, and some research solutions to these problems. Mobility issues and interoperability with the existing networks are addressed. Finally, the authors list some of the proposals to build wireless ATM systems from the literature View full abstract»

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  • Wireless ATM: air interface and network protocols of the mobile broadband system

    Page(s): 50 - 56
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    Wireless ATM systems for the connection of mobile multimedia terminals to the broadband ISDN for different applications are introduced, explained, and illustrated according to their specific quality-of-service requirements. The authors' approach to realizing an ATM multiplexer at the air interface is explained in detail, and new ideas on how to cope with the fact that an ATM transport network is not prepared to handle network-based handovers are presented. The article also describes some of the tools the authors have developed to study and analyze wireless ATM-related problems View full abstract»

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  • A system architecture for broadband millimeter-wave access to an ATM LAN

    Page(s): 36 - 41
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    We present a system architecture for a broadband indoor wireless digital communications system, capable of supporting ATM at transport bit rates up to about 160 Mb/s for broadband LANs. Access is via a radio system with carrier frequencies within the 20 to 60 GHz range, because of the relative abundance of available bandwidth in this range. The system design is shaped by a set of service requirements, by the characteristics of indoor millimeter wave radio channels, and by the constraints and opportunities of the relevant device technologies. The design includes a multi-access microcellular architecture accommodating ATM traffic with a wide range of broadband and narrowband bit rates and services in an office environment. A modern configuration incorporating bandwidth spreading, signal processing, and coding measures to provide immunity to the effects of radio channel fading, multipath, shadowing, interference and noise, and millimeter-wave component limitations has been developed. The architecture exploits millimeter-wave and SAW device technologies to design and realize the various transceiver components in low-cost, low-power monolithic and/or hybrid form View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Magazine ceased publication in 2001. The current retitled publication is IEEE Wireless Communications.

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