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IEEE Software

Issue 2 • Date March 1996

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Displaying Results 1 - 17 of 17
  • Bluepring for the Ideal Requirements Engineer

    Publication Year: 1996
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (204 KB)

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  • Requirement engineering: The Emerging Wisdom

    Publication Year: 1996
    Cited by:  Papers (42)
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Jackson's Latest: More Than A Lexicon

    Publication Year: 1996
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (339 KB)

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  • An object-oriented tool for tracing requirements

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):52 - 64
    Cited by:  Papers (73)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1412 KB)

    Large scale development demands tracing requirements and other objects in the face of continuous evolution. Requirements change in nature, scope, content, and form to become more consistent, accurate, complete, and clear. We present a tracing tool that supports evolution and that treats requirements and relations among them as objects View full abstract»

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  • Warranties: promising the improbable

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):105 - 106
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (404 KB)

    In other industries, a warranty reflects testing, which reveals how long and how well the product will perform. For example, a shock absorber can be tested for a specific lifespan and thus warranteed for 12 months or 24,000 miles. Until recently, however, there has been no real equivalent in software. From the standpoint of actual performance, software warranties have been made arbitrarily. Often,... View full abstract»

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  • Managing multiple requirements perspectives with metamodels

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):37 - 48
    Cited by:  Papers (33)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1460 KB)

    Stakeholder conflicts can be productive in requirements engineering. Capturing, monitoring, and resolving multiple perspectives is difficult and time consuming when done by hand. Our experience with ConceptBase shows that a simple but customizable metamodeling approach, combined with an advanced query facility, produces higher quality requirements documents in less time View full abstract»

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  • A generalized technique for simulating software reliability

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):77 - 88
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1528 KB)

    Although several models have been proposed for assessing software reliability, none has emerged as the most effective predictor. The authors offer a general simulation technique that relaxes or removes many of the usual reliability-modeling assumptions and expends the reliability process to encompass the entire software life cycle View full abstract»

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  • Our worst current development practices

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):102 - 104
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (532 KB)

    Successful software projects can result from avoiding the more serious mistakes that lead to disaster. Specifically, we must look at the actual results of similar projects; make planning and estimating formal activities; plan for and control creeping requirements; use formal inspections as milestones for tracking project progress and software disasters; and collect accurate measurement data, durin... View full abstract»

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  • Identifying quality-requirement conflicts

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):25 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (101)  |  Patents (9)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1104 KB)

    Without a well-defined set of quality-attribute requirements, software projects are vulnerable to failure. The authors have developed QARCC, a knowledge-based tool that helps users, developers, and customers analyze requirements and identify conflicts among them View full abstract»

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  • Universal safety standard is infeasible-for now

    Publication Year: 1996
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (792 KB)

    Some academicians have argued that we should not build systems until we find the absolute answers that will free us from accidents and losses. However, it is unlikely that society at large will allow such stagnation in the growth of safety-critical systems. The perceived benefits of continued development seem to outweigh the perceived risks. Given that, for now, we have to be content with multiple... View full abstract»

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  • Using formal methods to develop an ATC information system

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):66 - 76
    Cited by:  Papers (41)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1636 KB)

    Can formal methods be a part of large system development? The project teams at Praxis used a combination of formal methods to help specify, design, and verify CDIS, a large information display system within on ATC support system. Their project suggests that it can be practicable and beneficial View full abstract»

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  • Better software through operational dynamics

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):107 - 109
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (564 KB)

    Much of the existing theory about software focuses on its static behaviour, based on analysis of the source listing. Explorers of requirements, estimation, design, encapsulation, dataflow, decomposition, structure, and code complexity all study the static nature of software, concentrating on source code. I call this the study of software statics, an activity that has improved software quality and ... View full abstract»

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  • Debugging for timing-constraint violations

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):89 - 99
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1972 KB)

    Analysts debug real-time distributed systems by viewing timing behavior in the context of four possible faults. Animations and graphs of execution history make it easy to see process interactions. By applying a method to determine which fault caused the violation, analysts can go beyond timing analysis to efficiently correct the program View full abstract»

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  • Creating the paperless office

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):124 - 126
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (624 KB)

    A year ago, Oregon's Construction Contractors Board was still largely dependent on paper files. Every day, its 50 employees handled an ever-increasing number of documents submitted by contractors and the general public. In fact, in each of the past seven years, the number of documents handled by the CCB has increased by 19 percent. The office now maintains more than 100,000 paper files, each one a... View full abstract»

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  • The impending demise of the file system

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):100 - 101
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (316 KB)

    The file system has been a trusted part of most computers for many years, and will likely continue as such in operating systems for many more. However, several emerging trends in user interfaces indicate that the basic file-system model is inadequate to fully satisfy the needs of new users, despite the flexibility of the underlying code and data structures. There is no need for users to know how t... View full abstract»

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  • Missing in action: information hiding

    Publication Year: 1996
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (348 KB)

    Information hiding is characterised by the idea of “secrets”-design and implementation decisions that a software developer hides from the rest of a program. It is part of the foundation of both structured and object-oriented design. In structured design, information hiding produces “black boxes”; in object-oriented design, it gives rise to the concepts of encapsulation and ... View full abstract»

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  • Do you really need formal requirements?

    Publication Year: 1996
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (544 KB)

    Informal methods, such as heuristics to identify users and choose system attributes and functions, can be a highly effective approach for developing requirements. More formal methods may not be necessary. The paper discusses the reasons for spending valuable resources on a requirements effort in the first place: to improve everyone's understanding of the customer's problem; to reduce the risk of u... View full abstract»

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Diomidis Spinellis
Athens University of Economics and Business
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